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3D Printers - Enlarge 1/24 Scale Parts to 1/18 Scale?


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#1 OFFLINE   ibj40

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 12:10 AM

I'm computer literate enough to turn my laptop on, log in, and surf; beyond that, not very competent.

I see discussions frequently regarding the capabilities of 3D Printers, and was wondering how far those capabilities have advanced?

As the title suggests, can someone with a 3D Printer take a part in 1/24 scale, scan it, and then print an enlarged part in 1/18 scale?

:dunno:
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#2 OFFLINE   lateapex

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 12:50 AM

Can you scan a part with printers?

But, yes. Once a scan/project file is created you can choose percentage of original size to print. Smaller or bigger. So you need some math too, hehe.

#3 OFFLINE   TALSCTSV

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 08:53 AM

There are several ways to scale it. Software for 3D printers that does the slicing(layers) has a scale option. Also, in programs like SolidWorks you can 3D model something and scale it, then save it as a .stl file to work with 3D printers.
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#4 OFFLINE   AOS

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 03:46 PM

View Postlateapex, on 15 May 2016 - 12:50 AM, said:

Can you scan a part with printers?

But, yes. Once a scan/project file is created you can choose percentage of original size to print. Smaller or bigger. So you need some math too, hehe.

A printer only prints. You need a 3d scanner.

#5 OFFLINE   ibj40

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 07:15 PM

View PostAOS, on 15 May 2016 - 03:46 PM, said:

View Postlateapex, on 15 May 2016 - 12:50 AM, said:

Can you scan a part with printers?

But, yes. Once a scan/project file is created you can choose percentage of original size to print. Smaller or bigger. So you need some math too, hehe.

A printer only prints. You need a 3d scanner.

Precisely what I thought I was asking.

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#6 OFFLINE   AOS

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 08:08 PM

Thing that gets lost from scanning and reprinting is the loss in object fidelity (made that term up just now). By that I mean when you scan something, there will be times where it will pick up or drop data leaving you with some imperfections in the CAD model. This requires you to clean it up before printing. Though if there does happen to be a part you just cannot find anywhere else other than the one piece you physically have, then I guess there's no other option.



But I would imagine if you wanted to get into printing your parts, you could get into the practice of modelling parts from scratch on a CAD program and print them out. This way the results avoid unintended imperfections.

Edited by AOS, 16 May 2016 - 11:29 AM.


#7 OFFLINE   TALSCTSV

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 09:32 PM

Exactly right AOS. We have a scanner at work and for it to even scan the object you have to paint it white. It is a timely process to scan and you will have to go back and fix areas in the software. That is reason why I didn't even mention anything about the scanner.
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#8 OFFLINE   Falango

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 09:50 PM

You can't scan with a 3D printer, but there is a program that builds a 3D model based on images alone, so that's a start. If I remember, it's called Agisoft Photoscan. I have only tried it a few time, but have been meaning to try it with one of my diecasts. It had a hard time (as most lidar scanners do too) with reflective surfaces, like car paint and windows, but it's with a try with a part.

Edited by Falango, 15 May 2016 - 09:50 PM.


#9 OFFLINE   AOS

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 11:32 AM

View PostFalango, on 15 May 2016 - 09:50 PM, said:

You can't scan with a 3D printer, but there is a program that builds a 3D model based on images alone, so that's a start. If I remember, it's called Agisoft Photoscan. I have only tried it a few time, but have been meaning to try it with one of my diecasts. It had a hard time (as most lidar scanners do too) with reflective surfaces, like car paint and windows, but it's with a try with a part.

I imagine spraying your object with something matte/flat like primer and placing some spotlights will help out immensely.

#10 OFFLINE   Falango

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 02:25 PM

View PostAOS, on 16 May 2016 - 11:32 AM, said:

I imagine spraying your object with something matte/flat like primer and placing some spotlights will help out immensely.

It sure would, I may try this out sometime as well. My new camera is in, so this week I may have time to try out Photoscan again. I really want to try to replicate parts from models and reprint them to exact accuracy. That way I can use said model to design new parts, reducing the number is reprints and fitting.



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