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How to repair a resin model


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#1 OFFLINE   Cornbeef

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 07:58 PM

So I got a Spark Yamaha OX99. It is a very nice model but opening it I managed to drop it out of the bottom of the box....... I managed to break one of the mirrors off. Iím so pissed as Iíve never broke one opening it. Anyway I tried glueing it with zap slow and it wouldnít stick. I wiped it all clean and tried super glue but again nothing, it wouldnít stick. I had the same issue with my BoS grifo, where I broke an exhaust tip off when I was moving it. Same thing. What ever itís made from wonít stick so I wanted to see what I should be using as I havenít had an issue on any other repairs Iíve needed to make.

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#2 OFFLINE   ibj40

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 08:30 PM

The thing you are dealing with is shear.  Glue doesn't hold well in shear, which is where there is a flaw or fault across a small, non-load bearing surface.

When I have these types of situations, I clean off both surfaces with very small grit sand paper to make them both as flat as possible.  Try to not change the relativity of the two surfaces if possible.

I then take a very small drill bit and drill a hole in the body and another hole in the stalk of the mirror.

I then use a very small piece of wire, such as a staple or paper clip (really depends on the size of the pieces to be held together), and cut off a piece that is too long for the application (will give you something to grip on while going through the next step).

Put a small dab of SuperGlue on the mirror stalk, and push the wire into it, and let is set up.

Cut off the balance of the wire until there is just enough to push into the hole you drilled in the body, and put a dab of SuperGlue on the end, and push it into the hole in the body, and align (if the wire is small and pliable enough, it will give you some latitude in bending a little bit if necessary).

Let the glue set up, and then, forever after, handle the model with loving care.

#3 OFFLINE   Cornbeef

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Posted 02 April 2020 - 08:52 PM

 ibj40, on 02 April 2020 - 08:30 PM, said:

The thing you are dealing with is shear.  Glue doesn't hold well in shear, which is where there is a flaw or fault across a small, non-load bearing surface.

When I have these types of situations, I clean off both surfaces with very small grit sand paper to make them both as flat as possible.  Try to not change the relativity of the two surfaces if possible.

I then take a very small drill bit and drill a hole in the body and another hole in the stalk of the mirror.

I then use a very small piece of wire, such as a staple or paper clip (really depends on the size of the pieces to be held together), and cut off a piece that is too long for the application (will give you something to grip on while going through the next step).

Put a small dab of SuperGlue on the mirror stalk, and push the wire into it, and let is set up.

Cut off the balance of the wire until there is just enough to push into the hole you drilled in the body, and put a dab of SuperGlue on the end, and push it into the hole in the body, and align (if the wire is small and pliable enough, it will give you some latitude in bending a little bit if necessary).

Let the glue set up, and then, forever after, handle the model with loving care.

Thanks for the reply. I was figuring the answer would be something like this.... I’m not sure I have the patience or ability to do it though....

#4 OFFLINE   ibj40

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 07:55 AM

Since I customize models as a hobby, I have been acquiring a number of tools over the past couple of years.

One that I have very handy are these finger drills.

Posted Image

They allow a greater degree of control, and can be found in a variety of sizes.

If I can be of any further assistance, please feel free to post here, or send me a PM.

Good Luck!

#5 OFFLINE   slartibartfast229

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 09:21 AM

Remember when drilling to try mark the area with a small indentation for the drill to work in (I use a sharp pin).
I also always place a small piece of clear tape over the area (I have mentioned this previously) to prevent run away.
Resin is easier to drill than metal, just remember to work in a well ventilated area - resin dust is nasty stuff.

#6 OFFLINE   Cornbeef

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 05:00 PM

Thanks for the info everyone.

ibj I’ll send you a pm at some point soon, when I get a chance to work on it.

#7 OFFLINE   ibj40

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 06:07 PM

 Cornbeef, on 03 April 2020 - 05:00 PM, said:

Thanks for the info everyone.

ibj I’ll send you a pm at some point soon, when I get a chance to work on it.

I'm here to help.

#8 OFFLINE   ibj40

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 08:23 AM

 slartibartfast229, on 03 April 2020 - 09:21 AM, said:


I also always place a small piece of clear tape over the area (I have mentioned this previously) to prevent run away.


Was drilling a hole in diecast last night and used your suggestion (actually used masking tape).

Thanks, saved me a snail track on some good paint!

#9 OFFLINE   slartibartfast229

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 08:46 AM

 ibj40, on 04 April 2020 - 08:23 AM, said:

 slartibartfast229, on 03 April 2020 - 09:21 AM, said:

I also always place a small piece of clear tape over the area (I have mentioned this previously) to prevent run away.


Was drilling a hole in diecast last night and used your suggestion (actually used masking tape).

Thanks, saved me a snail track on some good paint!
And a total disaster if a drill bit snaps.
I know this from personal experience, luckily for me it was a plastic kit and the shell oculd be dipped in brake fluid to strip back and start again.



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