1/18 Kyosho Renault Alpine Rally De Course 1973 - Kyosho - DiecastXchange.com Diecast Cars Forums

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1/18 Kyosho Renault Alpine Rally De Course 1973


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#1 OFFLINE   smsr725

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Posted 10 February 2021 - 09:10 PM

I was hunting for a Renault Alpine by Kyosho. While checking, i saw the rear wheels appear with noticeable negative camber. The models i came across are the Tour De Corse and the plain blue version, and both had been sitting on display. I crosschecked the rear axle, and it did not seem to have bent to cause this camber. The wheels were not wobbly and the tires looked sufficiently strong, and with no flat spot. The model weight is also not something that should cause the camber i felt.

Now wondering if any of you have noticed the same with your models. Does all Kyosho Alpines come with rear wheel negative camber?


Tour De Corse model:

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Plain Blue example i saw has more dramatic stance i felt.

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Edited by smsr725, 10 February 2021 - 09:12 PM.


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#2 OFFLINE   kasparek

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Posted 11 February 2021 - 12:08 AM

I have a Montecarlo one (from 10 years ago I think), and yes, huge negative rear camber. Always been in this way.
I think you can see it also in these pictures: https://www.diecastx...nte-carlo-1971/

It looks not realistic but, searching pictures for real Alpine A110, you can find also - but not only - something like these ones.
So I really don't know what the correct camber would be, but I think the models you saw are not damaged.

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#3 OFFLINE   smsr725

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Posted 11 February 2021 - 06:00 AM

View Postkasparek, on 11 February 2021 - 12:08 AM, said:

I have a Montecarlo one (from 10 years ago I think), and yes, huge negative rear camber. Always been in this way.
I think you can see it also in these pictures: https://www.diecastx...nte-carlo-1971/

It looks not realistic but, searching pictures for real Alpine A110, you can find also - but not only - something like these ones.
So I really don't know what the correct camber would be, but I think the models you saw are not damaged.



This is a fantastic reference. Thank you so much for this. I see if i can grab those :)

#4 OFFLINE   kasparek

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Posted 11 February 2021 - 02:40 PM

You welcome.

#5 OFFLINE   slartibartfast229

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Posted 11 February 2021 - 05:36 PM

Look here for some detail.
https://www.sportfah...x/sArticle/1166
It would seem the angle of negative camber depended on circumstances.
But you can clearly see the camber angle in a number of the photos.
I have the magazine, and in clearer images the negative camber is present - in some shots (it's about the 1971 Monte Carlo rally only).
Two things can be considered - the car had a plastic body (so a diecast Kyosho is actually inaccurate (!)) and a rear engine.
Squeezing the widest tyres possible under the arches as permitted by the rules often led to such tactics, on dry tarmac in particular.

#6 OFFLINE   smsr725

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Posted 12 February 2021 - 09:22 PM

View Postslartibartfast229, on 11 February 2021 - 05:36 PM, said:

Look here for some detail.
https://www.sportfah...x/sArticle/1166
It would seem the angle of negative camber depended on circumstances.
But you can clearly see the camber angle in a number of the photos.
I have the magazine, and in clearer images the negative camber is present - in some shots (it's about the 1971 Monte Carlo rally only).
Two things can be considered - the car had a plastic body (so a diecast Kyosho is actually inaccurate (!)) and a rear engine.
Squeezing the widest tyres possible under the arches as permitted by the rules often led to such tactics, on dry tarmac in particular.

Thank you so much. i always enjoy how different resources can be sourced by coming to this forum!!
Interesting that for once, a plastic shelled 1/18 scale would have made better sense... one thought that we always seem to frown upon!

#7 OFFLINE   BVR

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Posted 29 April 2021 - 01:03 AM

What is more important, is that the Alpine A110 had a swing rear axle, so camber changed depending on how the car was on the ground. The lower, the more negative the camber. An many cases (especially heavier cars) this made for quite, erm, interesting handling dynamics. The Alpine did quite well with it.
Here's a rally Alpine during a jump, notice the positive camber as the wheels come down.
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