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The Fastest Cars in History


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#76 OFFLINE   Josh

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Posted 31 October 2015 - 11:58 AM

Thanks for the info, I am not looking to add one but I am really glad you showed it here. I love it, had no idea they were made.

Feel free to View My Collection Thread
http://www.diecastxc...and-collection/

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#77 OFFLINE   joeyo387

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 11:38 PM

OK, I have filled my display case with 20 cars spanning 117 years and 245 mph and I think it is time for another whole collection update. First, here is the display case:

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And now the stories about the cars.




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1988 Benz Patent Motorwagen Model III*
o   1.5 bhp 1.0 liter Single Cylinder - Carbureted - 2 valve - 500 redline
o   2-speed – RWD
o   794 lbs – 106.3 in long. 55.0 in wide, 57.1 in tall
o   0-60 N/A – top speed 12.4 mph^
o   $1,000 - 25 produced˚
While steam, electric, and combustion engines had been experimentally retrofitted to carriages for almost a century before, it took until 1886 (only 7 years after Edison invented the lightbulb) for an inventor named Karl Benz to patent a vehicle designed around an engine. The first car had less than 1 horsepower, only 1 speed (engaged by sliding a belt from one cylinder to another), and rode on solid rubber tires. Two years later Benz brought an upgraded model to market with an extra seat, wooden wheels, and a foldable top, aided by publicity created by his wife Bertha when she borrowed the car without her husband’s knowledge and drove it 60 miles to her hometown.* This model shows the Model I which was patented in 1886.
Dimensions refer to the Model I, which weighed 584 lbs.
^ Widely regarded as the first purpose-built automobile, the Model I Benz could only muster 8 mph, while the more numerous model III could hit 12.
˚ 25 Model IIIs were built, in addition to one each of the experimental No I and II prototypes.
- Plastic model by Norev.




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1902 DMG Mercedes Simplex 40HP*
o   45 bhp 6.8 liter Inline 4 - Carbureted - 2 Lateral Cam 2 val/cyl - 1400 redline
o   4-speed manual – RWD
o   2756 lbs
o   0-60 N/A – top speed 46 mph^
o   $15,000 (60,000 Goldmark) – 1510 produced˚
The story of the first “modern” automobile begins in 1900 with a diplomat and car dealer named Emil Jellinek, who commissioned the engineers Wilhelm Maybach and Paul Daimler to build a new car for his racing team. Called the Mercedes 35HP after Jellinek’s daughter, it featured an innovative radiator and handled better than the tall and heavy motorized carriages that it competed against. The following year, the racy 35HP evolved into a road-oriented model called the Simplex (after the simplified shifter) which was fast enough to set a speed record in the hands of William K. Vanderbilt Jr. and win numerous races, including the popular Nice-La Turbie hillclimb.
* This model shows the 5th 40HP built, which appears to have a shorter wheelbase than most others. It was sold to the millionaire William K. Vanderbilt Jr and used to set a speed record of 65.9 mph in racing trim, driving from Ablis to Chartres. It has since been converted to road spec. with fenders and lights, but still wears the 508-M registration shown in photos from both the speed record attempt and the Curcuit du Nord race. It resides in the Mercedes museum and is believed to be the oldest surviving Mercedes. This model has the non-louvered engine cover from the racing version, but is otherwise identical to the road spec. car.
The 35HP had a 1000 rpm redline, and sources report 1100-1400 for the 40HP. Engine speed was controlled by the steering wheel mounted throttle (3 pedals control the clutch and 2 auxillary brakes in addition to the primary hand-operated drum brake).
^ The Simplex 40HP road car topped out between 46 and 50 according to Mercedes.
˚ Including all Simplex models (18HP, 20HP, 28HP, 40HP, and 60HP) through 1910.
- Diecast model by Johann Distler.




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1924 Hispano-Suiza H6C*
o   160 bhp 8.0 liter Straight 6 – Carbureted – SOHC 2 val/cyl – ~3000 redline
o   3-speed manual – RWD
o   3490 lbs – 218.0 in long. 70.5 in wide, 60.0 in tall
o   top speed ~100 mph^
o   ~$19,500˚ – ~2500 produced˚
In 1919, after powering the majority of allied biplanes during World War I, the Hispano-Suiza company (named to reflect its Spanish founder and Swiss engineer) essentially cut their V12 fighter engine in half and placed it in their new H6, thereby resuming production of the world’s fastest and most luxurious cars. The huge aluminum-block I-6 formed the heart of the H6 series, but the cars also featured the first-ever power assisted brakes (which were promptly licensed for use by Rolls Royce). The H6 solidified its reputation for speed in 1928 when an aging H6C beat a brand new Stutz Black Hawk in a 24-hour race at Indianapolis, winning a $25,000 transatlantic wager.
* This model shows the 1924 H6C “Tulipwood Torpedo” owned by the millionaire, race driver and fighter ace André Dubonnet. He purchased a short-wheelbase “Boulogne” H6C with a revised valvetrain (making 200 bhp) and a low-mounted radiator, then commissioned the aircraft builder Niuport to construct a mahogany body with copper rivets (weighing only 160 lbs). The car finished 6th at the 1924 Targa Florio and 1st in class at the Coppa Florio, then was fitted with aluminum fenders for road use. It was nearly destroyed in a fire in the 1950s and rebuilt with wooden fenders, and now resides in the Blackhawk Museum in California.
  Depending on the bodywork. These figures refer to the H6C “Dubonnet Tulipwood Torpedo.”
^ Motor Sport magazine writes that it could go “close to 120” but the claimed 100 is more likely.
˚ Cost ~$8,000 for a rolling chassis alone. Production numbers Include H6, H6B and H6C models.
- Diecast model by TRL Models, lightly modified.




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1929 Duesenberg Model J*
o   ~210 bhp 6.9 liter Straight 8 – Carbureted – DOHC 4 val/cyl – 4650 redline
o   3-speed manual – RWD
o   5269 lbs – 211.5 in long, 72.6 in wide, 69.6 in tall
o   0-60 in ~13 s – top speed ~116 mph^
o   $13,000 - $19,000˚ – 433 produced˚
Although the Duesenberg brothers were unmatched engineers, capturing the land speed record as well as wins at the French Grand Prix and Indianapolis, their Model A failed to sell, leading them to bankruptcy by the mid 20s. Luckily E.L. Cord came to the rescue, freeing Fred from his business duties and challenging him to build the world’s biggest and fastest car. The Model J proved to be everything that Cord had ordered and was also innovative, featuring an adjustable hydraulic brake assist and indicator lights for oil and battery changes. While the Great Depression hurt the J’s sales, the cars nonetheless were coveted by American movie stars and European royalty alike.
* This model shows a standard-wheelbase model J dual cowl phaeton, with Duesenberg’s in-house “La Grande” body.
  265 was claimed, but was based on an engine with experimental valve timing.
^ Estimates range from 112 to 119, with 116 being the most commonly cited top speed.
˚ Price depended on the bodywork. 433 J models plus 36 supercharged SJ models.
- Diecast model by Signature Models, lightly modified.




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1954 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Coupe
o   240 bhp 3.0 liter Inline 6 – Direct Injected – SOHC 2 val/cyl – 6450 redline
o   4-speed manual – RWD
o   2851 lbs – 177.9 in long. 70.0 in wide, 51.2 in tall
o   0-60 in 8.5 s – ¼ mile in 16.0 s – top speed ~155 mph^
o   $6,820 – 1400 produced˚
The 300 SL, one of the most iconic road cars of all time, actually began its life in 1952 as a racecar called the W194. Its advanced aerodynamics and stiff, lightweight frame earned it wins at Le Mans, the Nurburgring, and Mexico’s Carrera Panamericana despite being underpowered compared to competing Ferraris and Jaguars. Soon a New York dealer convinced Mercedes to build a road version, which gained direct injection (a production car first) while retaining the racer’s “gullwing” doors which were required to clear the high-sided space frame. With the optional racing camshaft and the tallest axle ratio it could top 150 mph, faster than any other road car in 1954.
^ 161 was claimed by the factory with the optional lowest gear ratio, but never verified. Road and Track achieved an average of 140 on a standard ratio car (which Mercedes claimed could hit 146). Many sources estimate 155 as the actual top speed.
˚ Plus 1858 Roadsters
- Diecast model by Minichamps.




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1958 Ferrari 410 Superamerica Series III*
o   380 bhp 5.0 liter V12 – Carbureted – SOHC 2 val/cyl
o   4-speed manual – RWD
o   3,210 lbs – 185 in long. 66.5 in wide, 54.4 in tall
o   0-60 in 5.6 s – ¼ mile in ~13.5 s – top speed ~163 mph^
o   $16,800 – 12 produced˚
When his road car business was still very young, Enzo Ferrari chose to call his most powerful and luxurious GT the America in honor of its most important market. Then in 1955 the America line was replaced by the 410 Superamerica, a bespoke model that catered to Ferrari’s wealthiest customers. Due to its extreme price (more than twice that of a 300 SL), only 33 410s were built over five years and three series that saw various changes to the wheelbase, Pininfarina bodywork, and engine. The Series III models featured an updated version of the Lampredi V12 that produced a claimed 380 horsepower and made it the fastest car in the world when it was released in 1958.
* This model shows a 1956 shorter (2600mm) wheelbase Series I car, chassis 0501SA, which was the last Series I car produced. It was purchased by Freddy Damman, a Belgian racing enthusiast and car collector. It now resides in the United States, and has been shown at the Amelia Island Concours D'Elegance and the Palm Beach Cavalino Classic, where it took silver in Class 12 in 2002. The model does not have the extra rear reflectors or custom radio on chassis 0501SA.
^ 163 was claimed by Ferrari. A to Z of Sports Cars by Mike Lawrence says the top speed was “more than 155” and Road & Track estimated 165 after testing a Series III.
˚ Plus 16 Series I cars and five Series II cars.   
- Diecast model by Hotwheels Elite.




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1961 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Series I Coupé Aerodynamico*
o   340 bhp 4.0 liter V12 – Carbureted – SOHC 2 val/cyl
o   4-speed manual – RWD
o   3,100 lbs – 178.3 in long. 66.1 in wide, 51.6 in tall
o   0-60 in 5.5 s – ¼ mile in ~13.7 s – top speed ~168 mph^
o   $18,000 – 14 produced˚
When designing the 400 Superamerica to replace the 410, Ferrari used the smaller, sturdier Colombo V12, meaning that the initial examples of the 400 were slower than their predecessors. That changed in 1960 when the aptly named Superfast II show car was unveiled with covered headlights and a teardrop-shaped tail, aerodynamic advances that would be echoed in the Jaguar E-Type as well as future Ferraris. The Superfast II concept became the prototype for the Coupé Aerodynamico bodies which were fitted to nearly all subsequent 400 SA chassis from both series, and its slippery design allowed the 400 Superamerica to reclaim the title of the world’s fastest car.  
* This model shows a 1963 Series II (extended 2600mm wheelbase) car, chassis 4271SA. It was sold to Felice Riva, who later bankrupted his family textile business. It was shown at the 1999 Concours Automobiles Classiques & Loius Vuitton, and now resides in the United States.
^ 165 was claimed despite being less powerful (even 340 BHP was probably optimistic) than the 410 SA. However, the Aerodynamico coupes were capable of higher speeds, being lighter and more aerodynamic than the Maserati 5000GT. Auto, Motor und Sport wrote that they could achieve between 168 and 174 mph, “which at the beginning of the swinging sixties was enough for the title of ‘fastest production car in the world’" (Luxus-Coupé mit Colombo-Genen, 07/11).
˚ Plus 18 Series II Coupe Aerodynamicos, 11 Cabriolets from both series, and 3 other cars including the Superfast II Concept and a one-off for Gianni Agnelli.   
- Resin model by BBR.




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1966 Lamborghini Miura P400*
o   350 bhp 3.9 liter V12 – Carbureted – DOHC 2 val/cyl – 7700 redline
o   5 speed manual - RWD
o   2601 lbs – 172.8 in long, 70.1 in wide, 43.3 in tall
o   0-60 in ~6.3 s – ¼ mile in ~14.5 s – top speed 171 mph^
o   $21,000 – 474 produced˚
It is not surprising that the word “supercar” was coined by an automotive journalist specifically to describe the Lamborghini Miura. Thanks to Marcello Gandini’s racy bodywork and Gaimpaolo Dallara’s revolutionary chassis, which mounted the V12 transversely behind the driver to reduce polar inertia, the Miura was faster and more extreme than anything else on the road when it debuted in 1966. Because it was rushed into production to satisfy popular demand, each successive car was improved as it rolled off the line. These upgrades culminated in the SV, which likely recaptured the speed title for Lamborghini until the arrival of its successor, the Countach LP400.
* This example shows a 1971 P400 SV model, which itself may have been the fastest in the world in 1971.
^ 171 was measured by Motor, quoted by Autozine
˚ Plus 140 P400S models and 148 P400 SV models.
- Diecast model by Autoart.




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1968 Ferrari 365 GTB/4
o   353 bhp 4.4 liter V12 – Carbureted – DOHC 2 val/cyl – 7500 redline
o   5-speed manual – RWD
o   3530 lbs – 174.2 in long, 69.3 in wide, 49.0 in tall
o   0-60 in 5.4 s – ¼ mile in 13.4 s – top speed 174 mph^
o   $19,500 – 1,269 produced˚
At a time when the automotive world was fascinated by mid-engine cars like the Miura, the Ford GT40, and Ferrari’s own 330 P4, Ferrari took a risk by making its new flagship a traditional front-engine GT. Also called the “Daytona” in reference to the P4’s victory over the GT40 in 1967 on Ford’s home turf, Leonardo Fioravanti’s elegant but outmoded design didn’t stop it from taking three class wins at Le Mans in its “Competizione” version or from becoming the fastest car of its day, as publicized by Brock Yates and Dan Gurney in the 1971 Cannonball Run. By 1973, Ferrari caved to popular pressure and replaced the Daytona with the mid-engine 365 GT4 BB.
^ 174 was claimed by Ferrari and verified by Autocar, quoted by Autozine.
˚ Plus 122 “GTS” Convertibles. 1971-73 models had pop-up headlights to meet new US safety regulations.
- Diecast model by Kyosho




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1968 Iso Rivolta Grifo 7 Litri*
o   435 bhp 7.0 liter V8 – Carbureted – Pushrod OHV 2 val/cyl – 6500 Redline
o   4-speed manual – RWD
o   3578 lbs – 174.4 in long, 69.7 in wide, 47.2 in tall
o   0-60 in 6.1 s – ¼ mile in 13.4 s – top speed 174 mph^
o   90 produced˚
In 1961, before his 250 GTO had begun to dominate the world’s racetracks, Ferrari’s chief engineer Giotto Bizzarrini lost his job. He went on to consult for Iso, the firm that had previously designed the tiny car now known as the BMW Isetta. There he designed a new chassis to carry a small-block Chevy engine and Giugiaro’s elegant bodywork. The 1963 Grifo A3/L was a modest commercial success, and the racing A3/C even won its class at the ‘65 Le Mans after the rival GT40s were eliminated. In 1968, Iso fitted the Grifo with the Corvette’s big-block 427 L71 engine, challenging the Ferrari Daytona as the world’s fastest car before Iso fell victim to the 1973 oil crisis.
*This example shows the 1972 Grifo IR-8 which used a Ford Boss 351 engine and featured Gandini’s Series II facelift introduced in 1970.
Based on the 1968 Corvette with the same engine, because data on the Grifo 7 Litri is difficult to find.
^ 186 was claimed but never verified. Ultimate Performance Cars, edited by Craig Cheetham, says the Grifo 7L could run “up to 170” (p.137). Autozine estimates 174 to match the Daytona, which seems plausible given the car’s enormous 435 bhp and drag-inducing upright grille (prior to the 1970 facelift).
˚ Plus 323 Grifos with other engines for a total of 413, of which 322 were from Series I (66 Series I 7 Litris) and 78 of which were Series II (24 Series II 7 Litris).
- Resin model by BoS Models.




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1974 Lamborghini Countach LP400
o   375 bhp* 3.9 liter V12 – Carbureted – DOHC 2 val/cyl – 8000 redline
o   5-speed manual – RWD
o   3020 lbs - 163 in long, 74.4 in wide, 42.1 in tall
o   0-60 in 5.6 s – ¼ mile in 14.1 s – top speed ~175^
o   $52,000 – 157 produced˚
Countach! (roughly translated as a cat call) exclaimed Nuccio Bertone upon seeing the first drawings by his protégé Marcello Gandini. The name stuck and the beautiful design was a hit at the 1971 Geneva auto show, setting future trends for scissor doors and a cab-forward wedge profile. The Countach entered production three years later and continued to evolve for an astonishing 16 years, carrying the Lamborghini company through some rough times until the introduction of the Diablo. Despite many subsequent engine upgrades, the aerodynamic LP400 version was one of the fastest Countaches of all, holding the coveted title of “fastest production car” for ten years.
* 375 bhp may be overstated, as Lamborghini reduced the claimed power of the LP400S to 353 without making any engine changes.   
^ 186 was claimed by Lamborghini but never verified. Evo wrote that the Countach’s performance was on the order of the Miura, with both hitting 175 all-out (Supercar Years: 70s 09/09).
˚ Plus 235 LP400S models, 323 LP5000 S models, 610 LP5000 QV models, and 657 25th Anniversary models.
- Diecast model by Kyosho




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1984 Ferrari GTO
o   400 bhp 2.88 liter Twin Turbo V8 – Injected – DOHC 4 val/cyl – 7500 redline
o   5-speed manual – RWD
o   2557 lbs - 168.9 in long, 75.2 in wide, 44.1 in tall
o   0-60 in 4.8 s – ¼ mile in 12.7 s – top speed 188^
o   $83,400 – 273 produced
As its hallowed name implies, the GTO was built to race, in this case in the FIA’s wildly unregulated Group B class that became popular with rally fans in the 80s. With racing in mind, the GTO was made very light, thanks to Fioravanti’s bodywork made of exotic materlials and a tiny V8 with two turbos that pumped out 400 hp. And of course, while the road-going “288” GTO was smashing the Countach’s speed record and fulfilling homologation rules, Ferrari was hard at work on the “Evoluzione” racing version. Sadly, a string of tragic accidents shut down Group B and the Evoluzione program with it, leaving the GTO road car to stand alone as one of the greatest Ferraris ever.
^190 was claimed by Ferrari, and 188 was measured by Auto Motor und Sport, quoted by Autozine.
- Diecast model by Hotwheels, heavily modified.




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1987 Porsche 959
o   444 bhp 2.85 liter Twin Turbo Flat 6 - Injected - DOHC 4 val/cyl - 7300 redline
o   6-speed manual – AWD
o   3197 lbs* - 167.7 in long, 72.4 in wide, 50.4 in tall
o   0-60 in 3.7 s – ¼ mile in 11.9 s – top speed 195^*
o   $225,000 – 255 produced*
Opinions differ about the original intent behind the 959. Some say it was conceived as a technological testbed for the 911, while others claim it was built (too late) for Group B rallying. As a racecar, it scored a 1-2 victory in Dakar and 7th overall at Le Mans as the first ever AWD entrant. The 959 was similarly pioneering when it finally hit the streets in early 1987. Built on a modified 911 chassis, it could digitally monitor tire pressure and dynamically adjust the turbos, ride height, damping, and torque delivery in the AWD system. Many of these advances were firsts for a road vehicle and they produced a versatile car that was amazingly stable at its record-setting top speed.
* In late 1987 Porsche made 66 Sport models, which lost 220 lbs or more by removing a/c, power windows and seats, and adjustable ride height, as well as active damping in American-bound cars. Auto Motor und Sport recorded 197 mph in a Sport model.
^195 was claimed by Porsche and measured by Auto Motor und Sport, quoted by Autozine.
- Diecast model by Autoart




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1987 Ferrari F40*
o   478 bhp 3.0 liter twin turbo V8 – Injected – DOHC 4 val/cyl – 7750 redline
o   5 speed manual – RWD
o   2646 lbs – 174.4 in long, 78.0 in wide, 44.5 in tall
o   0-60 in 3.9 s – ¼ mile in 11.5 s – top speed 203 mph^
o   $415,000 – 1,315 produced
With the demise of Group B, Ferrari was left with a potent but half-finished racecar. So when Enzo Ferrari began looking for a way to battle Porsche’s 959 on the road instead of the racetrack, as well as to celebrate his company’s 40th birthday in style, he developed the 288 GTO Evoluzione into the F40. In contrast to the luxurious, digital 959, the F40 was spartan and mechanical, featuring a Fioravanti-designed body made mostly of carbon fiber and doing without a stereo, power driving assists, and even roll-down windows and catalytic converters on early models. It was the last car designed under Enzo’s guidance and the fastest road car in the world for 3 years.
* This example has aftermarket lightweight wheels that were a popular addition to many F40s.
^ 201 was claimed by Ferrari, and 203 was measured by Quattroruote, quoted by Autozine.
- Diecast model by Kyosho




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1990 Lamborghini Diablo*
o   492 bhp 5.7 liter V12 – Injected – DOHC 4 val/cyl – 7500 redline
o   5-speed manual – RWD
o   3472 lbs – 175.6 in long, 80.3 in wide, 43.5 in tall
o   0-60 in 4.1 s – ¼ mile in 13.3 s – top speed ~206 mph^
o   $239,000 – ~900 Produced˚
When Automobili Lamborghini began to design the Countach's replacement, they targeted a top speed of 196 mph, a value that in 1985 would have been the fastest for any production car. Five years later, after some input from Chrysler, the Diablo was offered for sale: designed by Gandini, built with aluminum and exotic composites, powered by Bizzarrini’s V12 that harked all the way back to the Miura, and claiming a top speed of 202 mph (the original Diablo went even faster, easily capturing the production speed record). Many revisions followed, bringing AWD, 6.0L displacement, and freshened bodywork as the Diablo’s production run stretched over a decade.
* This example shows the 1992 Diablo VT variant with custom black paint around the taillights.
^ 202 was claimed and matched by Road & Track. Ultimate Performance Cars published 205 while Jeremy Clarkson stated on Top Gear that the original Diablo had been “officially clocked at 206 in Italy” but did not specify by whom. Sandro Munari touched 211 on the Nardo track, although this was not verified with test gear.
˚ Plus ~2000 other models including the VT, VT Roadster, SV, SE30, and VT 6.0 variants.
- Diecast model by Autoart, lightly modified.




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1992 Jaguar XJ220
o   542 bhp 3.5 liter twin turbo V6 – Injected – DOHC 4 val/cyl – 7200 redline
o   5 speed manual – RWD
o   3241 lbs – 194.1 in long*, 87.4 in wide*, 45.3 in tall
o   0-60 in 3.8 s – ¼ mile in 11.5 s – top speed 212.3 mph^
o   $647,000 – 281 produced
The Jaguar XJ220 was developed as a thoroughly modern successor to the 1966 XJ13 racecar. In concept form, the XJ220 featured a new AWD drivetrain and sophisticated underbody aerodynamics while sharing its V12 engine layout and similar styling with the XJ13. However, mid way through development, the engineers were forced to switch to a twin turbo V6 driving only the rear wheels. Despite this setback and complaints about turbo lag, the XJ220 was successful on the track and road, finishing first in its class at Le Mans 1993 in the hands of David Brabham and David Coulthard (until a subsequent disqualification) and earning the title of “fastest car in the world”.
* According to XJ220  by Phillip Porter. Other sources have 191.3 in and 78.7 in for length and width, respectively.
^ 217 was claimed by Jaguar after testing without a catalytic converter and with a raised redline. 212.3 mph was achieved by Jaguar in stock condition, quoted by Autozine.
- Diecast model by Maisto, heavily modified.




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1992 Bugatti EB110 SS*
o   612 bhp 3.5 liter quad turbo V12 – Injected – DOHC 5 val/cyl – 8500 redline
o   6 speed manual – AWD
o   3126 lbs – 173.2 in long, 76.4 in wide, 44.3 in tall
o   0-60 in 3.3 s – ¼ mile in 11.7 s – top speed 218 mph^
o   $380,000 – 31 produced˚
In 1991, after reviving the legendary Bugatti name, the Italian entrepreneur Romano Artioli unveiled the fastest car in the world and the first Bugatti road car in 30 years: the EB110 GT. Soon after came the SS model, which weighed 450 lbs less and packed 50 more bhp, recapturing the speed record from the XJ220. The EB110 was well built, as Michael Schumacher attested when he bought one after comparing it to the F40, Diablo, and XJ220. In 1995, however, Bugatti went bankrupt due to their acquisition of Lotus and the development of the EB112. All unfinished cars were purchased by Dauer Racing, who assembled and sold 5 SS models and continues to service EB110s today.
* This example shows a 1995 Dauer EB110 SS model.
^ 218 was claimed by Bugatti and quoted by Evo Magazine (The Offspring 03/05). The increased power and decreased weight probably could have overcome the drag of the fixed wing and made it faster than the EB110 GT and the XJ220.
˚ Plus 95 GT models and five Dauer SS models.
- Diecast model by Maisto, heavily modified.




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1993 McLaren F1
o   627 bhp 6.0 liter V12 – Injected – DOHC 4 val/cyl – 7500 redline
o   6 speed manual – RWD
o   2513 lbs – 168.8 in long, 71.7 in wide, 44.9 in tall
o   0-60 in 3.2 s – ¼ mile in 11.4 s – top speed 231 mph^
o   $970,000 – 64 produced˚
After dominating the 1988 F1 season with Ayrton Senna behind the wheel of his car, McLaren’s designer, Gordon Murray, decided to celebrate by building “the ultimate road car.” Once he had secured the permission of Ron Dennis and a V12 from BMW, Murray produced the F1 complete with a unique central driver’s seat, a modem, fan-assisted ground effects, the world’s first carbon-fiber monocoque, and a top speed that wouldn’t be topped for 11 years. Though the F1 was originally meant for road use, the lightly modified F1-GTR was such a potent, reliable racecar that it defeated racing prototypes, finishing first at Le Mans 1995 with JJ Lehto and Yannick Dalmas driving.
^ 231 was claimed by McLaren after test driver Jonathan Palmer measured 231 at the Nardo test track. The F1 subsequently reached 241 at the WV’s Ehra-Lessien track with the rev limiter disabled.
˚ Plus five LM models and three GT Longtail road-cars.
- Diecast model by Autoart.




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2004 Koenigsegg CCR*
o   806 bhp 4.7 liter twin supercharged V8 – Injected – DOHC 4 val/cyl – 7600 redline
o   6-speed manual – RWD
o   2712 lbs – 165 in long, 78.3 in wide, 42.1 in tall
o   0-60 in 3.1 s – ¼ mile in 9.1 s – top speed 240.7 mph^
o   $650 000 – 14 produced˚
With his CCR, Christian Von Koenigsegg succeeded where so many car-lovers and entrepreneurs had failed trying to build a new supercar from scratch. A decade of meticulous design and engineering work culminated in February, 2005 when the CCR hit 241 mph, ending the McLaren F1’s 11-year reign as the fastest car in the world. But instead of resting on its laurels, the Swedish company began revising the CCR to meet U.S. safety and emissions regulations. The result was the CCX: boasting updated aerodynamics and powered by Koenigsegg’s own casting of the CCR’s Ford V8 block, the CCX was larger, faster, and (slightly) easier to drive than its predecessor.
* This example shows a 2006 Koenigsegg CCX
^ 241 was recorded on the Nardo test track and verified by the Guiness Book of World Records.
˚ Plus six CC8S models, 27 CCX models, six “Edition” models and three CCXR Trevita models.
- Diecast model by Autoart.




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2005 Bugatti Veyron 16.4
o   986 bhp 8.0 liter quad turbo W16 – Injected – DOHC* 4 val/cyl – 6600 redline
o   7 speed dual-clutch semi-automatic – AWD
o   4,486 lbs – 175.7 in long, 78.7 in wide, 47.7 in tall
o   0-60 in 2.5 s – ¼ mile in 10.4 s – top speed 253.8 mph^
o   $1,657,700 – 260 produced˚
In 2005 the Bugatti Veyron finally emerged, after six years of development, as the fastest accelerating, most expensive, most powerful, least fuel efficient, fastest production car on the road. The Veyron was enormously complex, featuring a computerized dual clutch gearbox and AWD system, 12 radiators, and hydraulic lifts to automatically adjust the ride height and two retractable spoilers. While the original Veyron carried its owner in elegance and luxury, the 2010 Super Sport version focused more on performance, recapturing the title of fastest production car from SSC by reworking the car’s aerodynamics and upping power to an incredible 1182 bhp.
*DOHC in the sense that separate camshafts control intake and exhaust valves. However due to the narrow angles of the W16 engine, one pair of camshafts controls two banks of cylinders, giving a total of four camshafts.
^ 253 was claimed by Bugatti and verified April 19, 2005 by inspection officials.   
˚ Plus 40 Super Sport models (including five World Record Editions) and 150 Grand Sport and Grand Sport Vitesse convertibles.
- Diecast model by Autoart.

Edited by joeyo387, 01 February 2016 - 12:02 AM.

A focused or planned collection can tell a story, while a random collection talks mostly about the collector. Neither is better than the other, it's personal choice - Woobs
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#78 OFFLINE   Josh

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 12:04 AM

I am gonna be spending some time here! :yahoo: I love this thread!

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#79 OFFLINE   CreepyVanMan

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 12:54 AM

Bookmarked :) thanks for compiling the history lesson
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#80 OFFLINE   redmanx

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 05:42 AM

Very nice rightup I enjoyed it very much you should consider a career as auto journalist.

#81 OFFLINE   Craig

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 05:56 AM

Ah cool!!! I like the write ups too! This is a good thread :occasion14:

F**k you Photobucket.



Please feel free to check out my 1/18 collection HERE


#82 OFFLINE   drivinghermad

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 01:16 PM

Just read the "history" Fantastic write up and a thoroughly enjoyable time to go through this fine work you have put in. :10: :agreed: :rock: :eusa_clap: :eusa_clap: :eusa_clap: :eusa_clap: :eusa_clap: :occasion14:

#83 OFFLINE   joeyo387

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 09:24 PM

I've gotten two new additions over the past year. Here is the first:

Attached File  IMG_1962.JPG   140.14K   0 downloads
1953 Pegaso Z-102 3.2*
o   223 bhp 3.2 liter V8 – Carbureted – DOHC 2 val/cyl – 7000 redline
o   5-speed manual – RWD
o   2183 lbs – 161.4 in long, 65 in wide, 50.8 in tall
o   0-60 in ~8.5 s – top speed 143 mph^
o   $18,050 – 84 produced˚
Wilfredo Ricart was not content designing trucks for the Spanish national company ENASA. Perhaps inspired by his rivalry with Enzo Ferrari which had developed when they both worked at Alfa Romeo, Ricart chose a winged horse for his logo and began to design a sportscar worthy of the old Hispano-Suiza factory where it would be built. The Pegaso employed the latest racing technologies in its light, balanced chassis and earned a reputation as the fastest car of the early ‘50s. Sadly, the racing effort was beset by delays and bad luck and Pegasos proved to be expensive to build, causing the Spanish government to axe the brand in 1958 in favor of more lucrative trucks.
* This model shows a Z-102 with a berlinetta body by Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera of Milan.
^ 143 was achieved by L’Journal Auto in a 3.2 liter model with 223 bhp. 152 was recorded on Belgium’s Jabbeke highway by a supercharged 2.8 liter Z-102 barchetta with racing bodywork and a claimed 280 bhp.
˚Including all Z-102 models with all engines. 42 were bodied by Touring, 20 by ENASA, 18 by Saoutchik, and several other prototype racing models.
- Resin model by BoS Models.
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#84 OFFLINE   Josh

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 10:44 PM

O man a 1/18 Pegaso!! I had no idea BOS did this!! Awesome Pegaso is a wonderful footnote in automotive history, the spanish version of Alfa. If Jaguar and Alfa Romeo had a baby this would be it!! Great addition, and as always I love this thread!

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#85 OFFLINE   joeyo387

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 09:20 PM

Last update:

Attached File  IMG_1961.JPG   139.49K   0 downloads

1959 Maserati 5000 GT*
o   340 bhp 4.9 liter V12 – Injected – DOHC 2 val/cyl
o   4 or 5-speed manual – RWD
o   3,642 lbs – 187.4 in long. 66.9 in wide, 52 in tall
o   0-60 in 6.5 s – top speed ~165 mph^
o   $14,000 – $17,000 – 34 produced˚
“My Maserati does 185. I lost my license, now I don’t drive” sang Eagles member Joe Walsh in 1978. While he may have exaggerated a bit, his 5000 GT was still among the fastest cars in the world almost 20 years after its debut. Yet Walsh wasn’t even the most famous 5000 GT owner. The car was born of a request from the Shah of Persia, who admired the 3500 GT. Maserati responded by fitting a leftover engine from the 450S racer into a reinforced 3500 GT chassis and adding a luxurious body by Touring that evoked the legendary 250F F1 car. Subsequent 5000 GTs had a tamed version of the engine^ but were nonetheless considered the fastest production cars around.
* This model has a body built by Carrozzeria Allemano.
  Part way through the production run the car was upgraded with a 5-speed transmission and rear disc brakes.
^ The first two (one for the Shah and a subsequent show car) used a 400 bhp racing engine and were unofficially clocked at 172 on the Italian autostrada by journalist Hans Tanner. Maserati claimed 340 bhp and 168 mph for the rest of the cars, which had Lucas injection, lower compression ratios, and quieter chain-driven cams.
˚ Plus the original two 5L models. Of the 34 production models, 22 were bodied by Allemano, 4 by Touring, 3 by Frua, and several others by Ghia, Bertone, and Pininfarina.
- Resin model by Neo Scale Models.

Edited by joeyo387, 15 July 2017 - 09:21 PM.

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#86 OFFLINE   Corso

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 11:06 PM

Nice! :D I always like to step by here and read those interesting classic supercar facts! But why in this chronological order is no Ferrari 250 GTO?
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#87 OFFLINE   drivinghermad

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 02:23 AM

I love the theme,Great updates and enjoyable to read about the real version of your model. :drool5: :drool5: :drool5: :drool5: :eusa_clap: :eusa_clap: :eusa_clap: :eusa_clap: :yahoo: :occasion14: :danke:

#88 OFFLINE   joeyo387

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 08:48 AM

 Corso, on 15 July 2017 - 11:06 PM, said:

But why in this chronological order is no Ferrari 250 GTO?

I used to have a GTO in the collection (in fact I still have the model) but ultimately I decided it didn't belong with the other road cars.

It was designed specifically for racing (didn't come with a speedometer) and all 36 GTOs made were raced.

It may have been technically legal to to drive on the road, but so were the GT40 and Porsche 917 and I had to draw the line somewhere.
A focused or planned collection can tell a story, while a random collection talks mostly about the collector. Neither is better than the other, it's personal choice - Woobs
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#89 OFFLINE   Corso

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 12:03 PM

Ok it make sense. Hope you don't get rid of that GTO.
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#90 OFFLINE   simondc07

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 07:51 PM

Two epic additions that I hope to add in time. The Pegaso is superb but I can't help but get detracted by the thick aerial of the 5000GT - otherwise this would have been a no-brainer for me too.

Great collection and theme though - well done

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#91 OFFLINE   joeyo387

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 10:06 PM

 simondc07, on 16 July 2017 - 07:51 PM, said:

Two epic additions that I hope to add in time. The Pegaso is superb but I can't help but get detracted by the thick aerial of the 5000GT - otherwise this would have been a no-brainer for me too.

Great collection and theme though - well done

Thanks. The Maserati is actually the better (and more expensive) model but so agree, BOS does some great stuff at a reasonable price. And yes, the antenna on the Maserati is a bit thick - maybe I could replace it with some piano wire. I already modded it a bit by painting the red accents in the trident logo...

Attached File  IMG_1970.JPG   102.62K   0 downloads

Edited by joeyo387, 16 July 2017 - 10:15 PM.

A focused or planned collection can tell a story, while a random collection talks mostly about the collector. Neither is better than the other, it's personal choice - Woobs
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