Q. Cross-drilling your own rotors - Wheels, Brakes and Stance works - DiecastXchange.com Diecast Cars Forums

Jump to content


Q. Cross-drilling your own rotors


17 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   StygianMax

StygianMax

    Senior Member

  • DX Hall of Fame
  • PipPip
  • 8935 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Most vehicles with wheels....just not shopping carts.
  • Favorite Brands:None at the moment
  • Proud Citizen of: ca

Posted 28 January 2004 - 03:13 PM

I have a few McLaren F1 GTRs whose rotors (aka brake discs) have black dots to simulate the cross-drilled holes.  I think it looks pretty cheesy.  Has anyone actually done their own cross-drilling and de-burring the holes to make the rotors more realistic?

:feedback
Felix (Click banner to see my diecast website)

Posted Image

Remove Advertisements User is offline Advertisement

  • DieCastXChange.com



#2 OFFLINE   Ronan

Ronan

    Member

  • DX Hall of Fame
  • Pip
  • 3381 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dublin, Ireland
  • Interests:Cars, cars and more cars! (And Diecastxchange too of course!)
  • Favorite Brands:CMC
  • Proud Citizen of: ie

Posted 28 January 2004 - 03:31 PM

No, but I agree the black dots look crappy! Wouldn't it be superb if AUTOart sold aftermarket wheel and brake kits that could be retrofitted to older models such as the UT McLarens and Porsche 911 GT1s. Now that would be cool!!!

Your idea about drilling the existing discs is a good one I think, but you would need a very fine drill, and I'd say it could be easy to break the discs if too much pressure was applied.

#3 Guest_TifosiF1_*

Guest_TifosiF1_*
  • Guest

Posted 28 January 2004 - 03:44 PM

I'm just curious what the average size of the "holes" are in cross drilled rotors, since I've never really measured them. The smallest bit I have is a 1/32", which would translate into a 9/16" hole on a 1:1 rotor.

I agree that actually holes would look great!

#4 OFFLINE   Venom

Venom

    Member

  • DX Elite
  • Pip
  • 3088 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Knoxville, TN
  • Interests:Scale models, videogames, 3d modeling, aviation, anime, R/C models
  • Number of Models:299
  • Favorite Brands:AUTOart, Spark, Ignition Models, HPI, GT Spirit, CMC, GMP
  • Proud Citizen of: us

Posted 28 January 2004 - 03:53 PM

To drill small holes in plastic I just sharpen a peice of hard wire to make holles smaller than any normal drill bit coule make.  :danbanna
Posted Image

#5 Guest_TifosiF1_*

Guest_TifosiF1_*
  • Guest

Posted 28 January 2004 - 03:55 PM

Venom, on Jan 28 2004, 02:53 PM, said:

To drill small holes in plastic I just sharpen a peice of hard wire to make holles smaller than any normal drill bit coule make.  :danbanna
I used to heat a sewing needle when I built plastic kits, but haven't done that in quite some time.

#6 OFFLINE   StygianMax

StygianMax

    Senior Member

  • DX Hall of Fame
  • PipPip
  • 8935 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Most vehicles with wheels....just not shopping carts.
  • Favorite Brands:None at the moment
  • Proud Citizen of: ca

Posted 28 January 2004 - 04:00 PM

TifosiF1, on Jan 28 2004, 04:44 PM, said:

I'm just curious what the average size of the "holes" are in cross drilled rotors, since I've never really measured them. The smallest bit I have is a 1/32", which would translate into a 9/16" hole on a 1:1 rotor.

I agree that actually holes would look great!
You bring up a good point TF1.  9/16" dia. holes is definitely too big on a real rotor.  It would crack pretty quickly from the reduced amount of metal to act as a heat sink.  It's been a while since I've seen a x-drilled rotor up close but I'm guessing the diameter to be closer to 1/8" to 3/16" (3-4 mm) on a 12"-13" dia. rotor as a very rough guess.
Felix (Click banner to see my diecast website)

Posted Image

#7 Guest_DiecastX_*

Guest_DiecastX_*
  • Guest

Posted 28 January 2004 - 06:51 PM

Sounds like an interesting project to start on. :cheers

#8 OFFLINE   LUW

LUW

    Senior Member

  • DX Hall of Fame
  • PipPip
  • 7424 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brazil
  • Favorite Brands:None right now
  • Proud Citizen of: br

Posted 28 January 2004 - 08:31 PM

Use a pin without the head as a drill bit on a Dremel or (better) bench press. The bench press is better because it has less rpm, and that prevents the heating of the "drill" and melting of the plastic of the rotor.
Luciano

#9 OFFLINE   Phil

Phil

    Junior Member

  • DX Community
  • 3 posts

Posted 28 January 2004 - 11:15 PM

I'm too lazy to walk out to my car and check, but I've attached a photo of my brakes.  They are 355 mm Brembo discs.  Based on that you get an idea of how small the cross drilled holes are.  Using Photoshop to measure, I figure the holes are roughly 1/4 inch in diameter.

Attached Files


Edited by Phil, 28 January 2004 - 11:20 PM.


#10 OFFLINE   yomama

yomama

    Junior Member

  • DX Community
  • 9 posts
  • Proud Citizen of: us

Posted 29 January 2004 - 12:22 AM

Why don't you go buy a small drill bit? Drill bits come in diameters as small as a strain of hair. I'm sure you can find one that will drill your rotors.

#11 OFFLINE   StygianMax

StygianMax

    Senior Member

  • DX Hall of Fame
  • PipPip
  • 8935 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Most vehicles with wheels....just not shopping carts.
  • Favorite Brands:None at the moment
  • Proud Citizen of: ca

Posted 29 January 2004 - 05:43 AM

Phil, on Jan 29 2004, 12:15 AM, said:

I'm too lazy to walk out to my car and check, but I've attached a photo of my brakes.  They are 355 mm Brembo discs.  Based on that you get an idea of how small the cross drilled holes are.  Using Photoshop to measure, I figure the holes are roughly 1/4 inch in diameter.
Welcome to the forum Phil!!!  Great to see you here.

http://www.diecastxc...tyle_emoticons/default/welcome.gif  https://www.diecastxchange.com/forum1/public/style_emoticons/default/welcome.gif  https://www.diecastxchange.com/forum1/public/style_emoticons/default/welcome.gif  https://www.diecastxchange.com/forum1/public/style_emoticons/default/welcome.gif  https://www.diecastxchange.com/forum1/public/style_emoticons/default/welcome.gif

Thanks for posting that awesome picture of your Brembo big brake kit!  (Is that a 4-pot caliper with Cadmium plated rotor?)  And if you don't mind me asking, what kind of car do you have?
Felix (Click banner to see my diecast website)

Posted Image

#12 OFFLINE   Phil

Phil

    Junior Member

  • DX Community
  • 3 posts

Posted 29 January 2004 - 09:50 AM

I have the Brembo F50 setup, which is 4-pot calipers with Cadmium plated rotors.  You have a good eye and good knowledge of brakes.  I actually have these on an Audi S4

#13 Guest_Jag Man_*

Guest_Jag Man_*
  • Guest

Posted 29 January 2004 - 03:49 PM

I did this on my Hot Wheels Ferrari 550M.  I used the finest watchmakers screwdriver in my set, but I'd be extra carefull with a UT Macca.  In my search for better brakes I found that Bburago models(atleast my 360M), surprisingly, have quite nice brakes, especially the back side(the side facing the inside of the car), where the holes are extremely fine.  I also discovered that my HWs rear calipers come off quite easily, so they can be fitted to other cars with a little work.
I agree with Ronan that AUTOart should sell brakes/wheels, etc...  as aftermarket parts.

#14 OFFLINE   prowler

prowler

    Member

  • DX Community
  • Pip
  • 221 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Goodyear,Arizona
  • Favorite Brands:Kyosho,Autoart
  • Proud Citizen of: us

Posted 08 March 2004 - 07:41 PM

this is one of the front wheel assys from my enzo i'm doing.....cross drilled rotors from a pinvise and a .020 drill.it also has(hard to see) brembo badging on the calipers....wish it was a better pic.sorry guys....

Attached Files


Posted Image

#15 OFFLINE   StygianMax

StygianMax

    Senior Member

  • DX Hall of Fame
  • PipPip
  • 8935 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Most vehicles with wheels....just not shopping carts.
  • Favorite Brands:None at the moment
  • Proud Citizen of: ca

Posted 08 March 2004 - 07:46 PM

That's really nice work prowler!!  :nicejob  :nicejob  :nicejob Did you first create a "template" to mark out where you have to drill through the rotors?
Felix (Click banner to see my diecast website)

Posted Image

#16 OFFLINE   prowler

prowler

    Member

  • DX Community
  • Pip
  • 221 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Goodyear,Arizona
  • Favorite Brands:Kyosho,Autoart
  • Proud Citizen of: us

Posted 08 March 2004 - 08:07 PM

no...i used the dimples that were in the rotor...i have done this to all my models that i have detailed.i think it is totally unforgivable to have crap detail or missing features on cars(the engine bay struts on the enzo...for one)

just wait until my enzo is done....should be another week or so....depending on when i get my new bike that is.....lol
Posted Image

#17 Guest_RichardM_*

Guest_RichardM_*
  • Guest

Posted 09 March 2004 - 01:20 AM

Nice work prowler. I admire you taking matters into your own hands to improve the detail. :nicejob

#18 OFFLINE   Ronan

Ronan

    Member

  • DX Hall of Fame
  • Pip
  • 3381 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dublin, Ireland
  • Interests:Cars, cars and more cars! (And Diecastxchange too of course!)
  • Favorite Brands:CMC
  • Proud Citizen of: ie

Posted 09 March 2004 - 07:45 AM

Jag Man, on Jan 29 2004, 09:49 PM, said:

I did this on my Hot Wheels Ferrari 550M.  I used the finest watchmakers screwdriver in my set, but I'd be extra carefull with a UT Macca.  In my search for better brakes I found that Bburago models(atleast my 360M), surprisingly, have quite nice brakes, especially the back side(the side facing the inside of the car), where the holes are extremely fine.  I also discovered that my HWs rear calipers come off quite easily, so they can be fitted to other cars with a little work.
I agree with Ronan that AUTOart should sell brakes/wheels, etc...  as aftermarket parts.
Absolutely, aftermarket AUTOart wheels and brakes would make such a difference to so many models.



Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users





Copyright © VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.