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How to make 1/18 roll cage ?


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#1 OFFLINE   zocc

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:44 AM

Hi guys, i want to produce racing roll cage for may project car but i don"t have expirience with that, I have some plastic bars that can be easy bend by heat. My question is how do you measure the interior of the car to shape the roll cage to be correct as it should be ??
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#2 OFFLINE   zocc

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 02:30 PM

Anyone ??
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#3 OFFLINE   Seby123

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 01:11 AM

you could try and use paper to make a template? ive tried to make a cage before, wasnt easy. i had the car apart and without any paint on it though so could simply press the tubing against the pillars and shape it.

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#4 OFFLINE   mark

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 08:36 AM

This is a mod I've had a challenge with.  I have done a couple of simple roll bars with the two diagonals that go from the top to the back of the car.  Not too hard.  But when you go for the roll cage - measuring is tough.   Getting the height and all the angles right is hard!  

You need to "model" it first - try using solder or something soft that will bend and re-bend easily to get the right shapes and lengths.  Then use those parts as 'templates' to match up your plastic bars with.

There is a lot of trial/error in getting things to fit.  If you have a good measuring tool (like an inside caliper) that'd help.  I don't have one, unfortunately....


Mark

#5 OFFLINE   zocc

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 07:52 AM

 Seby123, on 10 December 2012 - 01:11 AM, said:

you could try and use paper to make a template? ive tried to make a cage before, wasnt easy. i had the car apart and without any paint on it though so could simply press the tubing against the pillars and shape it.

 mark, on 10 December 2012 - 08:36 AM, said:

This is a mod I've had a challenge with.  I have done a couple of simple roll bars with the two diagonals that go from the top to the back of the car.  Not too hard.  But when you go for the roll cage - measuring is tough.   Getting the height and all the angles right is hard!  

You need to "model" it first - try using solder or something soft that will bend and re-bend easily to get the right shapes and lengths.  Then use those parts as 'templates' to match up your plastic bars with.

There is a lot of trial/error in getting things to fit.  If you have a good measuring tool (like an inside caliper) that'd help.  I don't have one, unfortunately....


Mark

I guess thats it, i'll keep on trying until i am satisfied with the result. I got lots of spare tubes/bars. All i need is luck, LOL.

Thanks guys,

zocc
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#6 OFFLINE   swede70

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 11:37 AM

Greetings,

Consistent with what everyone else has already said, I'll relate a few other things.

Indeed, time can be saved for quickly bending up a dimensional prototype - especially for complex areas running behind the A-pillars, wrapping around the dashboard, etc.  I too use file cards and typically fold a series of them in half to focus entirely on creating a single contour that will rest 'just so' inside a contour slated to be filled.  It may take five to eight attempts to learn the appropriate lessons regarding height, where a bend must occur, learn what one must to resolve interference issues, etc.  Once the single contour is arrived at (imagining that one is fitting a main hoop into a model behind B-pillar detail), I then open the file card and adjust for width if need be.  

Be certain to photocopy or post on cork boards nearby all the applicable photo reference you might be able to gather.  Too easy it is to stockpile such, take comfort for having undertaken the effort, and then ignoring all the quality information you've gathered when fabrication work is taken up in earnest.  In short, the material is only a few paces away, but so confident you might be that to mount the effort to deliberately refer to it seems almost too much to ask.  With this in mind, you'll wish to have views accessible to you at a glance, availed to you almost absent conscious thought.  Cluster these images regarding particular areas being fabricated, whereas sustained study of them will reveal nuances otherwise unsuspected as you in essence confront problems and challenges the initial designers and fabricators encountered as they did the same work in 1:1.

Just a short aside here, it may not be a bad idea to start with a pair of plastic kits or to employ a 'spare' diecast model bodyshell cut down the center from front to back to establish a rough and ready understanding of fit issues versus the quite constant need to fit, adjust, fit, adjust that the task effectively requires.  In point of fact, the 1:18th Sun Star 1964 Pontiac GTO I'm using for a project has a readily removable hardtop given the company wanted to share tooling between it and the convertible also offered.  In a sense, this tool forms an ideal learning platform for the model can remain in place as I set in and lift out the cage being constructed with near abandon.

Height at this point may be added or reduced for taping other bits of file card to what evolves out as a template.  The resulting template is then photocopied, while an ink pen is used to demarcate where nails will be used to form something of a jig.  A judgment is made as to how far back I must set the nails inside of the tube and wire I employ so as not to exceed the exterior tracing of the template I've worked up, although at this point I'm usually ready to go.  Further and as might be predicted, I usually save my file card cutouts as 'last resort' templates in case everything I work upon past such point is rendered rubbish for overreaching...

I use hollow plastic tube with brass wire inside, and have a wooden bread board with different nails tapped in to serve as a mandrel of sorts. A candle will burn nearby, and for more extreme bends I'll spin the plastic tube with brass wire inside it to prevent cracking.  At times I'll also employ a vat of hot water to rest the plastic tubing with to achieve the same end; i.e. bends that will not result in damage to the tube.  Usually the technique is to bend a bit further than is strictly required and backing out just a bit.  Should you be too timid and bend only to the point where the angle is just achieved, the possibility exists that the material will relax a bit with the angle formed eroding.  I'd advise too that practice is required to place a bend precisely where you desire.  This can be achieved by using a Sharpie ink marker and then grappling with the material to determine the properties of the same as you develop technique.

Where a fish mouth join will be created to bond one tube to another I measure out and pull back the brass wire within the plastic tub used accordingly, whereas a small amount of excess is left exposed where the tubing might connect to fabricated flanges that would in turn be welded to the structure of the vehicle.  Typically I glue my 'flanges to be' to another sheet of plastic to facilitate the process of drilling each through the center under the presumption that the brass wire will be sited such.  For both gussets and flanges create the same in excess with the understanding that they will prove difficult to shape and invariably be lost for transfer to the work.  In short if you 'need four', by all measure create at least eight.  Stamina is built for factoring in what emerges as an expected rate of loss.

Once the main hoop and the aforementioned tubing running forward of it toward the A-pillars and down is created (guided by the rough prototype work created from tiny craft pipe cleaners, brass wire, etc.), initial fish-eye fitting work to join the tubes will be necessary, this typically done with a series of tiny round files.  Experimenting with various thickness of glue will eventually help you identify those that set up a bond that appears much like a weld.

Even if a tube isn't strictly load bearing or subject to stress, I typically reinforce additional tubes with the aforementioned brass wire to ensure new additions will not sag.  As I make additions, I'm in the habit of cutting out perhaps seven or eight lengths of plastic tube of the approximate length for errors are incredibly common, while only trial and error will translate into a structure of quality.  The tightness of fishmouth joins formed, especially coming in at odd angles, is a test of sorts of how competent your fabrication work will be judged.  Do not be surprised if three quarters of the way through you'll decide to start over for the work isn't as symetrical as you'd desire, the work is judged too short, or that you learn so much for undertaking the work that the quality of late-stage work badly overshadows work undertaken at the earliest stages - such is how it is.

What is seen below is a 1:25 Jo-Han plastic kit of a 1970 American Motors SCCA Trans Am Javelin.  The stock kit rollcage was fair, although for the project I desire and desired far better.  All the tubes you seen were created from what is roughly described above.  Kind regards...

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Mike K.

Edited by swede70, 21 March 2013 - 03:40 PM.


#7 OFFLINE   SleepyS2k

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 12:04 PM

check my build thread for my s2000. i used aluminum craft wire to shape the frame of my hardtop. although i have never built a roll cage before, i could easily see this stuff being used for a roll cage. It is easily bendable and rebendable. you could use hot glue like i did to temporarily keep them together, and once you have the final shape, glue them together and paint the entire cage black, chrome, whatever.

#8 OFFLINE   mach504

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:15 PM

for rollcages you want a nice plastic or metal tubing/stick. those can be found at hobby stores. ask for plasticard and there should be some tubing of different sizes. just choose the one you want and when you want to bend it, run it through very hot water and then bend slowly. that is what i had done for something not for cars but rollcage-ish

#9 OFFLINE   E Rod_017

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 08:35 PM

I was going to ask the same question when I started my Mustang SVT Cobra R race car until I found this
http://www.diecastxc...make-roll-cage/

You should find some helpful tips and reference pics here.
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