How to LOWER Maisto 1:24 scale diecast models-a simple tutorial - Wheels, Brakes and Stance works - DiecastXchange.com Diecast Cars Forums

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How to LOWER Maisto 1:24 scale diecast models-a simple tutorial


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#1 OFFLINE   CarCrazyinARKANSAS

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 11:54 AM

By lowering a model, one is able to change the character and "look" of a model from either mildly non-stock to full-blown wildly radical. It's all about the degree of execution.

There are basically three possibilities (with infinite variations in between) to lowering:

1) front end only
2) rear end only
3) both front and rear

Depending on the result you want to achieve, the front or rear suspensions (axles) or both will need to be altered. Some other parts on the body and/or chassis might have to be changed too.  So how do you do this?  Let's look at the front end first.

On Maisto 1:24 scale models, most, if not all, have a front end suspension consisting of an axle with holes fitting over two plastic studs projecting from the chassis. The axle is able to swivel on these two studs or posts allowing the wheels to be posed. Importantly for our purposes, the axle can move up or down on these posts, thereby allowing the wheels and axle to move upwards on the posts.  Pics 1 and 2.

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In the stock or non-lowered position, the front axle rests on the very bottom of these posts. To lower the model, we must make the axle move higher up on the posts, in effect, causing the body of the model to then be lower when it is attached to the chassis.  By putting a spacer with a hole, a round block with a hole, or metal nut or washer over the post, then installing the axle, the result is the axle now is higher up on the post, thereby lowering the body.  By experimenting with varying thicknesses to your spacers, blocks, nuts or washers, the ride height can be changed. I have found that small metal nuts and/or washers are the most convenient spacers.

Note well, however,that when the interior tub is placed onto the chassis, it usually has molded into it two tabs with holes that hold down the axle to the posts.  You will see that when the spacers are added to the posts that the top of the posts are at a different height within these two holes than on the original model.  Depending upon the particular model, when assembling the body to the chassis and interior tub, some minor and/or major adjustments to the interior tub and/or body might have to be made so that the body and tub fit properly when screwing the chassis to the body on final assembly. Sometimes this process causes a bind. This is because of the added spacers throwing off the original build characteristics. Test fit the chassis to the body and see how it looks. This process is a lot of trial and error.  But be patient and you will learn where the adjustments to the interior tub or body need to be made. Carefully determine what should be removed or cut out. Remember that you will have a rougher time trying to redo something if you remove material unnecessarily. If the tires rub in the wheel wells, adjust your ride height spacers or resort to grinding out the wheel wells, etc..  I try and avoid this at all cost if possible. Also, sometimes the axle has to be made slimmer so that it may function properly.  Just be careful when making these kinds of decisions because once done, it is usually quite difficult, if near impossible, to remedy. The front end lowering process is usually more difficult than the rear due to the fact that it is more involved because of the engine being present and the steerable front wheels.
pic 3,4 and 5.

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The rear end lowering process is much easier than the front.  The rear axles are in two squarish grooves and are held in place by two plastic white rectangles. Cut off the heads of the four fastening stubs and remove the rectangles,  then remove the axles.  Now use some thick or thin pieces of any material, wood, plastic, metal, and place in the grooves. Whatever the thickness of the material will dictate the ride height. I have found thin strips of aluminum soda cans and cardboard to be helpful as well as plastic strips from any source, even sprue.  Now with the strips in place, test fit your axles. I use clear tape to temporarily hold them in place and check the ride height by putting the body on the chassis. Trial and error is a big factor here again, but it is usually easier than the front end and takes far less time and effort.

You will probably have to cut off the projections on the bottom of the rectangular pieces to make them fit flush with the axles for a good solid bond when gluing them back onto the chassis. It is a good idea when removing these to mark the pieces accordingly so that they end up in their original position on the chassis. pic 6

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Hopefully, this will help you some in your quest to lower your favorite models, especially the Maisto 1:24s. Model on!!
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#2 OFFLINE   ravtoy

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 11:58 AM

Thanks for posting the tutorial.  Would like to see 1/18 lowering tutorials also.  Very informative.  





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