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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a couple of models that don't need any serious metal bashing to upgrade them and I was going to do one of these next for a nice easy project. However, a complete lack of discipline on my part has forced me to move this latest acquisition to the front of the queue. I could have picked up a green one for less than I paid, but I wanted a red one and as I'm crap at painting, didn't want to have to strip and respray. Also I can't find any scripts and logos for Astom Martin in 1:18. That makes things a little more difficult when metal bashing but we'll see how I get on. First some pics and comments on the model as it comes.

The overall finish is quite nice albeit with some areas of paint rash on my example, which I have been able to improve with polishing compound and wax polish.
Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Hood


The plastic moulded parts are very good quality and much better than most of the other budget models that I have. The chrome surrounds on the clear parts is also very well done but with one or two chips here and there which will require some attention.
Tire Wheel Land vehicle Vehicle Car


A big negative is the sealed boot lid which is where the serious metal bashing will be done to make it open.
Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Hood


The Aston Martin and Zagato badges are decals but look quite good. The front and rear inciators plus brake lights are chromed plastic and coloured red and orange at the rear, so they will be replaced with suitable clear items either scratched up or purchased. Although the tail pipes are moulded and could be improved by drilling out, I have some metal parts and will replace them.
Car Vehicle Automotive lighting Hood Motor vehicle


The headlights and covers are excellent as is the grill. From images I'd seen before purchasing, it looked so good I thought it was open (it will be), but it is in fact closed and the gaps are just black painted. The lower intake vents are also closed and will require opening up. They are also a little to prominent so I may file them back.
Land vehicle Vehicle Car Grille Hood


The hinges on the bonnet are not prototypical so the front edge dips into the engine compartment when opened, rather than lifting clear as it should. Unfortunately, I dont think there is room to add realistic hinges as I did on my Ferrari 250 LM upgrade, so I may have to accept it as it is.
Car Vehicle Hood Automotive lighting Motor vehicle


The engine is quite a nice representation of the Aston Martin unit, albeit lacking in a number of details and the windscreen wipers are acceptable. There's no sign of any screen wash jets so I'll need to check the refference photos to see where they should be.
Vehicle Hood Automotive lighting Grille Motor vehicle


The underside is a bit basic and will also benefit from some attention. The engine is missing the gearbox and bell housing and the prop shaft from the engine doesn't line up with the short length from the differential.
Trigger Automotive exterior Bumper Gun barrel Air gun


The dashboard and steering wheel are quite nice and the door hinges are the push on/pull off type with a spring. Visually they are much better than having a dog leg, but they don't open or closed very smoothly. I think the seats are particularly good having a nice representation to the cushion creases and the black is a nice matt colour very like real automotive leather ( which I came across a lot of in my work before retiring), so I'll leave them as they are. European automotive leather tends to have quite a low gloss level (not dead matt) but certainly not shiny. Over time it would of course polish up and that was one of the challenges for the producers of automotive surface coatings, coming up with a formulation that met all the specs for touch, wear properties etc., but without polishing. No Aston Martin badge on the dash, but the ignition key hole is there. There's no carpets either but I have some dolls house carpets on order and will follow @X-Filer's method of fitting them as he did on his upgrade. I'll use the existing pedals but will modify them so they are mounted from the floor not the firewall.
Vehicle Gear shift Car Motor vehicle Automotive design


Nice door cards but they are missing the storage pouch lower down. The handles are mounted from the rear of the cards through openings and will receive some attention to clear the cards and look more realistic. Door windows and frames will of course be added.
Automotive lighting Hood Automotive mirror Bumper Communication Device


The wheels are nicely moulded for what they are (nothing like the prototype) and are cleverly fitted.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive tire


When you pull off the knock offs there is a concealed cross head screw, which is a bugger to unscrew with a watch maker's screwdriver as it is so tight and the driver keeps slipping. However, if you remove the tyre you find that the wheel moulding is in two halves and the outer one simply pulls off revealing the screw and allowing the use of a screwdriver with a bigger handle and more grip. Nice of Yatming not to glue them together. I'm replacing the wheels with a set from KK, partly because I can't find any supplier with stock of the correct BBR set and also after having used BBR on my E Type Jag upgrade, I wanted to give them a try. I've not received them yet but will post some comparison photos.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive tire


First thing to do is turn it into a kit of parts. Removing the six screws from the base releases the the body and then the rest is straightforward, with the moulded parts fixed on the inside with heat, the melted plastic can be sliced with a chisel blade to release them. A novelty on this model is that the seats are screwed to the cockpit floor. Here are all the bits apart from the main body casting after dismantling. I don't have the patience to lay them all out neatly as some on here do, so sorry about that.
Engineering Gas Motor vehicle Machine Font



So, on to the butchery starting with the front grill. Here the two mounting stubls have been cut off.
Water Wood Road surface Asphalt Tints and shades


I then rubbed down the rear on Emery paper placed on a flat surface until holes started to appear at the edges of the moulding.
Automotive parking light Grille Line Font Flooring


To avoid overdoing it at the edges, the rest was competed using Emery paper glued to a lollipop stick. Tedious and dusty work.
Manhole cover Manhole Rectangle Mesh Grille


There were two cross members behind the grill that I have cut out with a slitting disc in the mini drill and filled back the stubs. The three lower vents have also had the blanking removed.
Vehicle Car Grille Hood Automotive lighting


And a dry run with the grill in place.
Car Vehicle Grille Wheel Automotive lighting


No going back now! I drilled a 0.5mm hole in the boot gap to insert the piercing saw, then tediously and slowly cut out the boot lid. It took me about an hour and six broken blades to do it. The first blade broke after cutting about half an inch and I thought my God, what am I doing? The metal is quite thick and the lid will need quite a bit of thinning before refitting.
Photograph Textile Wood Line Pattern


And with the masking tape removed. The edge will need tidying up and a flange for the lid to rest on added. Oh, and hinge as well!
Eye glass accessory Bumper Red Wood Composite material


And the boot lid after much filing and sanding to thin it down.
Brown Textile Wood Rectangle Sleeve


Strangely, I've managed to add more than 20 images, plus some I dont want but can't delete, so the system seems to be having a melt down.

Cheers,
Peter
 

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Nice project,

You called for Aston Martin logo's Mr. P. ?

Here you go :




Sincerely

Pascal
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Many thanks Gents.

Another useful supplier added to my bookmarks Pascal. The decals are already on their way!

I had another look at the front end and there's loads of room to add more realistic hinges and in fact it will be more difficult at the rear. I'll be doing it slightly different this time compared to the hinges I made for the Ferrari 250 LM and E type, but I'm leaving them till later.
Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Bumper Automotive design Magenta


The complete engine compartment can be removed from the floor section of the model and from images I've studied of the prototype, it looks very good, albeit lacking a number of details and having chromed cam covers. The sump with the
spuriously located prop shaft is at the top.
Circuit component Technology Engineering Office equipment Electronic component


To make things easy, the engine breaks down into eight components. This shot from the workbench has been rotated, but guess on which part of the mat most of the work gets done.
Circuit component Water Hardware programmer Passive circuit component Electronic component


X-Filer has done a very nice upgrade of this model here,
and his work on the underside of the model is most helpful. However, after scouring t'internet the only other images I could find of the chassis were these of the CMC model. This is the development model.
Land vehicle Toy Automotive lighting Vehicle Motor vehicle


And the production version. I've brightened the image to make the details clearer.
Product Automotive lighting Toy Motor vehicle Automotive design


I know you shouldn't use a model as refference, but as I've nothing else to go on, I'm going to assume that CMC having the resources to research their models, will for the price they charge, get everything spot on. Won't they? From what I've read some high end collectors have found otherwise, but I'm going to use these images as a basis to add more detail to my model. If anybody knows where to find an image of the underside of the real car, a link to it would be much appreciated. So heres what I've done so far.
Wood Revolver Gun accessory Hunting knife Knife


The sump has been beefed up with the addition of plasticard to the sides to replicate the CMC version and a representation of the bottom of gearbox added from plasticard, 0.5mm brass rod and a short length of tube cut from a Biro pen.
Wood Line Water Material property Gas


To add the vanes I scribed parallel lines with the spring bow dividers then carefully widened them with the scrawker, before adding the brass rod fixed with CA.
Road surface Wood Asphalt Flooring Floor


Here's what it looks like in place. A fair bit of carving of the floor pan is needed to get it to fit, as well as a lot of sanding on the top edge of the sump to lower its height (or depth or whatever). English is not my strong point ( or Portuguese, or Dutch, or German, etc,etc). As per CMC, I've also filled in the gap in the lower front body panel and will also paint it red.


Here I've added the front anti roll bar and fixing brackets and made a dry fit with the front and rear axles and exhaust. The moulded brake lines on the floor pan have been carved off and rubbed down ready for separate cables to be added. As you can see I'm not replicating the CMC layout exactly as I've added a short cover to the transmission tunnel behind the gearbox and left the rear cover as is.
Motor vehicle Combat vehicle Self-propelled artillery Office equipment Machine


Self-propelled artillery Combat vehicle Toy Wood Motor vehicle


Anybody know what those two circular gizmos above the anti roll bar are?
Motor vehicle Gas Vehicle Automotive exterior Electrical wiring


The chromed end of the exhaust is a separate part. It's not too shabby but I'm replacing the tail pipes with these made from bootlace ferrules.

Asphalt Road surface Wood Line Floor


When it comes to replacing the wheels, my preference would have been a set of BBR P02s. However, I cannot find stock anywhere including at BBR, so I considered using set of KK wire wheels. @modifier used them on his upgrade here
and they looked pretty good to me. @X-Files used BBRs on his upgrade so I hope neither of them mind me posting some comparison images from their threads. First a prototype image from the interweb, followed by modifier's model with KK wheels and then X-Filer's with BBRs.
Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Automotive lighting


Car Vehicle Tire Hood Wheel


Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Motor vehicle


Neither of the wheels sets match the prototype but they both look good to me and are a vast improvement on the shitty Yatming wheels. There was some comment on modifier's thread regarding the profile of the sidewalls on the KKs being too flat and I would agree they do look flatter than the BBRs. However, although I would have gone with BBR had they been available I am happy to use the KKs especially as I was able to get a set for about half of what it would cost for BBR. Heres a comparison of the wheels. The BBR wheel shown here is from the set P01 used on my E Type Jag but apart from the 2 ear wheel nuts are the same as P02s. All dimensions have been added for comparison.
Automotive tire Tire Font Circle Rim


Tire Wheel Automotive tire Synthetic rubber Tread


You wouldn't believe from this image that there is only 0.5mm difference in overall tyre width, as the taper towards the tread on the BBR tyres make them look much thinner. Clearly the tyre wall is flatter on the KK wheels as mentioned by X-Filer and the BBR tyres are closer to prototype.
Automotive tire Camera accessory Rim Circle Font


The BBRs are slightly over 2mm larger in diameter along with the sidewall taper and and different tread patterns.
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Synthetic rubber Tread


The only thing I overlooked to photograph is how the wheels fit on the car. The machined Al hub on the BBRs rotates in the PE spoke etchings and has an axle fitting hole of 3mm diameter. The wheel nut fixes to a spigot on the outside of the hub so does not rotate with the wheels as it should. Also, the rims are machined Al.

The KK wheels have chromed plastic rims with PE spoke inserts with a plastic hub glued to the rear. You have to come up with your own method to make them rotate but as the wheel nuts are fixed to the PE spoke etching, they will rotate with the wheels. I followed @modifier's method of fitting as he kindly sent me some images of how he did it and so saved me some head scratching. You just need a bush to fit over the plastic axle which is then sealed in place by melting the end with a soldering iron. The bush was cut from Al tube to 3.5mm lenght which with the thickness of the plastic when melted allows the wheel hub to fit without fouling the axle end. Ideally, the OD of the bush should be just slightly smaller than the ID of the hub for a firm sliding fit with no wobble. My bushes are a little too small so I wrapped them with Al tape to thicken them and they work fine.

Cutting mat Wood Table Flooring Machine


I'm in the process of reducing the ride height as the smaller diameter wheels give the impression of Bambi on spindly legs!

Cheers,
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I lowered the ride height by 2mm front and rear to get this. Much better than it was but it's dipping towards the front slightly.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive lighting


The prototype looks level.
Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Automotive lighting


So further work work at the rear dropped it further about 1mm to get this which I'm happy with.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive lighting


This is the butchery needed at the front and rear to drop the ride height. 2mm cut off the column in the wheel arch, the lower pin replaced with a lenght of brass rod 2mm longer than the original and a gap filed in the chassis either side to clear the steering rack. It was also necessary to file down the ends of the steering rack and the connecting rod to the front uprights. Subsequently I removed the stop under the gap in the chassis as it was limiting the steering and I also removed the connection to the steering rod as that was fouling the chassis. I probably could have just thinned it down, but as I've mentioned in other threads, having the steering wheel move with the steering doesn't bring a lot to the party for me.
Green Blue Bumper Motor vehicle Personal protective equipment


As well as removing @3mm from the mounting columns on the rear axle, I also cut slots in the floorpan just behind the wheel arches and just inboard of the front of the arches.
Green Motor vehicle Gas Engineering Machine


This shows the increased movement now possible on the front steering. It's a whole lot more than it was and the tyres don't foul the arches. I'll need to make and add the calipers and discs but the wheels can be pulled off easily to facilitate that. Oh, and air vales (not supplied by KK) will need to be added.
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Hood


The BBR wheels are probably a closer match to the real thing but I'm very happy with the appearance and as I said before, it saved me 20 quid getting the KK wheels.
Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire Automotive lighting


I wasn't however happy with the width over the tyres which seemed a little too far out to me. It was quite easy to remove 3 of the hubs to rub them down, but the forth was too firmly fixed. I had to remove the tyre and separate the two rim halves to get the PE centres out as it would not have been easy to accurately rub down the inner edge of the hub whilst in the rim. The hub depth is 7mm and I reduced that to 5.5mm. This allowed the wheels to fit further inwards and gave an appearance I was happy with.
Jewellery Auto part Circle Metal Fashion accessory



Before I start on the difficult task of making and adding the boot and bonnet hinges, I thought I'd have some fun with the engine detailing. Here's where I've got to with that.
Circuit component Passive circuit component Hardware programmer Electronic engineering Electronic component


Circuit component Electronic engineering Engineering Rectangle Fashion accessory


The gap in the black paint is where the masking tape was not correctly positioned, but the part for the top of the radiator will cover it. To give the appearance of the plug leads running through the tubes to the plugs, I've drilled a hole in the top of the engine and fed them through there, with sepagshotr lengths running from ghd tube to ghd plugs. The bolt detail on top of the rocker covers was a bit understated so I replaced them with bolts punched from styrene. I'll use Molotow chrome ink to pick out the chromed parts later. Although its not very robust, the parts are not in a position which will suffer from handling and dulling the finish.
Circuit component Electrical wiring Electronic engineering Electronic component Gas


Cheers,
Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The engine is almost done now. It still needs one or two bits and pieces adding to finish it off, but I couldn't resist a quick mock up. All the leads to the distributors (apart from the coil leads) are done, I've replaced the feed pipes on the carbs with clear "thread" coloured yellow to represent the fuel with Tamiya clear yellow, made and added the wingnuts to tops of the carb, coiled some fine silver wire around the ducting on the right, added some further ducting are the rear left, added missing hose clips and repainted the existing clips and hoses.
Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Bumper Electronic engineering


The plate to the left of the carbs in this image was chromed, but on prototype images it appears to be Al with chromed fixings so I've repainted it to match that. Nuts on the engine block and rocker covers picked out in chrome along with the plug lead tubes and various filler caps.
Hood Automotive lighting Bumper Motor vehicle Automotive design


The dipstick has been added between the exhaust manifold and some further piping needs to be added on this side along with some touching up of the paintwork.
Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Car Bumper Automotive design


Looks a bit more business like now.
Automotive lighting Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive exterior



Does anybody know where the ignition coils were located?

Cheers,
Peter
 

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The engine is almost done now. It still needs one or two bits and pieces adding to finish it off, but I couldn't resist a quick mock up. All the leads to the distributors (apart from the coil leads) are done, I've replaced the feed pipes on the carbs with clear "thread" coloured yellow to represent the fuel with Tamiya clear yellow, made and added the wingnuts to tops of the carb, coiled some fine silver wire around the ducting on the right, added some further ducting are the rear left, added missing hose clips and repainted the existing clips and hoses.
View attachment 274269

The plate to the left of the carbs in this image was chromed, but on prototype images it appears to be Al with chromed fixings so I've repainted it to match that. Nuts on the engine block and rocker covers picked out in chrome along with the plug lead tubes and various filler caps.
View attachment 274270

The dipstick has been added between the exhaust manifold and some further piping needs to be added on this side along with some touching up of the paintwork.
View attachment 274271

Looks a bit more business like now.
View attachment 274272


Does anybody know where the ignition coils were located?

Cheers,
Peter
Looks good
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you Porscheuk.

Well, that's the engine completed. I found some images showing the ignition coils, but as you'd expect with a limited production run of a car built 60 years ago, there are a number of variations. Here's where I've put the left hand one. I've added missing piping to the screen wash bottle, replaced the moulded pipe on that tank behind the coil and added that silver box in the top left corner. There are some wires at the bottom but they can't be seen.
Vehicle Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive exterior


The left hand coil is actually included as part of the moulding to the right of this image but I didn't realise until too late so I could not drill it to attach the cable from the distributor, hence the scratched built one higher up. I can't get at it to cut it off so I've just painted it matt black to hide it.
Musical instrument Font Wood Material property Art


The braided pipe along the left rocker cover added from the innards of a coaxial cable and the two bottles top left from styrene rod with punched plasticard nuts for the lids. The right hand coil is on the firewall below the distributor and was a bugger to get in and add the cable at this late stage.
Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Bumper Automotive lighting


The braided cable on the rocker is held at the nuts by loops of fine nickel plated wire. The fixings should be flat loop but that was a bit small in this scale. I see I've missed painting the nut at the left hand end! Correction to the 1st line of the post - well, that's the engine almost completed.
Hood Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Vehicle Bumper


I think is compares pretty favourably with the CMC engine now.
Hood Car Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive lighting


A representation of the throttle lever has been added to the carbs.
Vehicle Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive exterior


Unfortunately, with a front opening bonnet, you wont be able to see this view when its complete.
Hood Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Automotive design Bumper


For the spare wheel I'm going to use this front wheel off the Hotwheels Ferrari 250 LM. I'll remove the knock off nut of course, but it should look the part strapped to the bracket on top of the fuel tank.
Grille Automotive tire Hood Automotive lighting Automotive tail & brake light


It's a little smaller than the KK wheels but that won't be obvious when it's in place.
Tire Wheel Car Land vehicle Vehicle


I've got some grey dolls house carpet for the interior but it's a little on the light side, so I'm going to make some trials spraying dilute Tamiya Matt black to see if I can make it darker. If that doesn't take I'll try dilute Indian ink which I keep for playing with my drawing instrument collection.

Cheers,
Peter
 

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X-Filer has done a very nice upgrade of this model here,
and his work on the underside of the model is most helpful. However, after scouring t'internet the only other images I could find of the chassis were these of the CMC model. This is the development model.
View attachment 273978

And the production version. I've brightened the image to make the details clearer.
View attachment 273979

I know you shouldn't use a model as refference, but as I've nothing else to go on, I'm going to assume that CMC having the resources to research their models, will for the price they charge, get everything spot on. Won't they?
Looking at those photos I now see I've missed a few details... damn, because of you I might have to break my DB4 up again and add some more detail. Opening the grille with sandpaper is a good idea, I have to try that out for myself too. Also, I see I've missed out the gearshift linkage and front anti-roll bar completely...

You should be right regarding CMC... they usually boast about 3D-scanning a real car in order to CAD their models... but in this case I honestly think they must've scanned half a dozen different cars and mashed the data together cause I've never found one single car that remotely resembles the shape and details ofthe CMC. Just take one small example: on each sills there are two small portholes with body-coloured panels meant to jack the car up when necessary... but if you look at the frame jacking points they don't even match with the ports. Therefore, I'd use it like the Pirat'e Code: more like guidelines.

Anybody know what those two circular gizmos above the anti roll bar are?
View attachment 273987

The chromed end of the exhaust is a separate part. It's not too shabby but I'm replacing the tail pipes with these made from bootlace ferrules.

View attachment 273988
I honestly don't know... but if I had to guess, the only thing that I can think of is that those are horns. A bit strange for them to be placed so down low but I've seen quite a lot of strange solutions on car assemblies...

Neither of the wheels sets match the prototype but they both look good to me and are a vast improvement on the shitty Yatming wheels. There was some comment on modifier's thread regarding the profile of the sidewalls on the KKs being too flat and I would agree they do look flatter than the BBRs. However, although I would have gone with BBR had they been available I am happy to use the KKs especially as I was able to get a set for about half of what it would cost for BBR. Heres a comparison of the wheels. The BBR wheel shown here is from the set P01 used on my E Type Jag but apart from the 2 ear wheel nuts are the same as P02s. All dimensions have been added for comparison.
View attachment 273998

View attachment 273997

You wouldn't believe from this image that there is only 0.5mm difference in overall tyre width, as the taper towards the tread on the BBR tyres make them look much thinner. Clearly the tyre wall is flatter on the KK wheels as mentioned by X-Filer and the BBR tyres are closer to prototype.
View attachment 273993

The BBRs are slightly over 2mm larger in diameter along with the sidewall taper and and different tread patterns.
View attachment 273996
Haha, funny... I knew BBR made their tyres with the Dunlop Sport thread but now I see KK did the Michelin XWX... I'm not sure when it was first introduced but I'm pretty sure it's later than the 1960s. Still they look to me a bit to flat-sided for a vintage tyre and the fact that the thread is so perpendicular to the walls doesn't help, there should be a bit of curvature around the shoulders IMO. Oh, and it the KK are supposed to mimmick Borrani wire wheels, the spoke count is too low, the BBR is bang-on correct with 72.

I guess looking at the pictures, particularly mine, one might ask himself "why did he retain the original, oversized, knock-offs?" Well, that's because, first of all, when I bought this set, I was sent a wrong one wit the 2-ear knock-offs and second the BBR's Borranis have the centre lobe convex while the DB4 GTZ's are concave. But I know, they're a bit too large for the wheel's size.

View attachment 274113

The gap in the black paint is where the masking tape was not correctly positioned, but the part for the top of the radiator will cover it. To give the appearance of the plug leads running through the tubes to the plugs, I've drilled a hole in the top of the engine and fed them through there, with sepagshotr lengths running from ghd tube to ghd plugs.
Sorry, couldn't help myself: when I red this, I just thought the car walked through your keyboard when were writing this and went to the loo and when you got back you just kept on going. It made me laugh! 🤣 🤣

BTW: love the engine. There's one detail I'll be improving on mine one day and that's the fuel lines to the carburettors, I kept the original yellow-painted plastic bits but since then I found some thin clear tube that I'll be tinting Tamiya Clear Yellow like you did and replace them. On the other hand, the Eagle from Albufeira spotted a tiny small detail ou got wrong: you placed the distributor plug leads vertical to the distributor axle when they should be perpendicular:

Vehicle Car Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design


And where did you get those wingnuts? They're gorgeous! Let me guess: you scratchbuilt them from copper...

Keep it up!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi João,
Sorry if I've induced you to revisit your model and add further details. Luckily the construction is very user friendly in terms of taking it apart and making mods, so it should not be too onerous. Imagine if you had to do it with a model such as the Looksmart Ferrari 488 that @wetsellery is doing? Nightmare!

Regarding the CMC model, as well as combining the characteristics from various 1960s cars, I think that they may have included details from the sanction II/sanctions III models as well. Still its beautifully done. I'll still be taking one or two more ideas from underside detail in the full knowledge that they may not be 100% correct.

On the fuel lines, I think they should be a little opaque so I'm going to try mixing a small amount of white into the clear yellow. I'll try it on a separate piece of the crystal string first to see how it looks. I'm glad you like the wingnuts on the carbs. There're a little too large and are not on every car, but hey it's a detail you just have to include.

On the distributors, the Eagle has spoken! I thought I saw them like that on one of the images of DB4Zs, but I think it may have been the set up on another model (maybe DB4 or DB5). By the time I realised it was wrong I'd already done it. :mad::mad::mad: I knew you'd spot it. Still, if cock ups are good enough for CMC, they're good enough for me.

One final comment on the KK wheels is that the knock offs are closer to the ones on the DB4Z than those on BBR as you mentioned.

I spotted this little publication going for a few quid on Ebay, that has a very interesting article on the DB4Z.
Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Motor vehicle


I've already found out a couple of things that I didnt know before but I need to study the images and the article further. One interesting point is that the car had an oil cooler below the radiator visible in some images throught the large duct below the front grill. When I added the PE radiator front, I extended it to the floor panel as I thought that was what is visible throught the duct. No problem as it looks like the oil cooler any way.
Tire Automotive tire Automotive lighting Vehicle Hood


Here's the self adhesive doll's house carpet with a portion over sprayed with dilute Tamiya matt black to darken it.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Land vehicle Car


And during fitting. I wrapped the side portions over the edge to give a neat joint between the carpet and the sills.
Wood Hood Flooring Hardwood Tints and shades


I'll be adding a strip of Al tape to represent the chromed cover plate on top of the sills.
Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Automotive tire


The carpeting in these cars was in separate segments and I've tried to represent the edging with vinyl cable. I'm not sure how successful it is but I'm keeping it. I originally carpeted the small storage area behind the seats, but some cars just have this area covered in leather or maybe Rexine, plus some chromed fitting for strapping down the luggage, so I've removed the carpet. Come to think of it, Rexine (faux leather) would have been too cheapskate for an up market brand like AM, so it's more likely the luggage area was leather covered, when not carpeted.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Hood


The doors handles on many of the DB4Zs were concealed mechanisms operated by a push button and I found these images by chance on Ebay. Hopefully I can replicate them (non working of course).
Font Rectangle Material property Auto part Gadget


Looks like the centre portion popped out when the button was pushed.
Wood Hardwood Metal Tool Rectangle


And an image from on a car.
Communication Device Bumper Automotive door part Automotive lighting Gadget


I'm not sure if any cars had the handles as supplied on the model as it comes. Some had a small loop that you could only get one or two fingers around with a push button to the rear to release the door catch, as shown in the image on the magazine above.

Cheers,
Peter
 
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