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The Jensen has been criminally ignored, Dinky made a contemporary model & there was a white-metal version by Enco some years ago.

But what a car, Italian styling by Vignale, power courtesy of American V8 muscle from Chrysler & screwed together in West Bromwich, England.

The FF version was built on a 4 inch longer wheelbase to house four-wheel drive & Dunlop Maxaret anti-lock braking was standard........all in all a real tour de force.

Someone please make it.

jinx
 
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Jensen Interceptor

Allan and Richard Jensen's auto business was started before World War II, which interrupted production until 1950, when their first Interceptor was made. At the time, they made Austin bodies under contract, and the first Interceptor resembled an Austin A40 (the Jensens built bodies for a string of cars that included the Volvo P1800, Sunbeam Tiger, and Austin-Healey.) The first Interceptor used a 4 liter Austin in-line six, and was produced in small numbers for over a decade. Jensen also used Nash Twin-Ignition Eight engines for a time, and the 1962 C-V8 used a Chrysler 361 B-block engine. A number of these early Jensens made their way to the US before and after World War II.
The next version kept the basic C-V8 chassis, but changed styling. Initially, an in-house convertible design was planned, but chief engineer Kevin Beattie argued for an Italian flavor. Proposals were taken from different design houses, with Carozzeria Touring winning out with a fastback coupe incorporating a rounded tail, but that house was unable to finalize the design. Vignale, instead, provided prototype and initial production bodies, rendered in steel, on CV-8 chassis sent to them by Jensen. Turnaround was quick - about four months - so the new Interceptors could be shown in London in October 1966. Jensen later used the jigs and tools, which were sent by Vignale to the West Bromwich factory.

The body had two doors, a low beltline, and fishbowl rear glass in a handsome 2+2 design. Power initially came from a 383 cubic inch (6.2-liter) Mopar V-8, with an easy 325 horsepower and tire-lighting torque, pushing a Chrysler three-speed Torqueflite automatic. A zero to sixty sprint took a mere 7.1 seconds - an excellent time for 1966 - with a 135 mph top speed. The Birmingham factory produced about 600 of these Interceptors per year.

Jensen offered a four-wheel-drive version of the Interceptor dubbed the FF; the four wheel drive system was developed by tractor manufacturer Harry Ferguson, making the FF one of the most technically sophisticated cars of its era, especially since it was one of the first production cars to have mechanical anti-lock brakes. The car boasted Girling disc brakes all around, when four-wheel disc brakes were a rarity.

The Interceptor was big for a European car, though small by American standards (shorter than a Camaro), with an overall length of 188 inches, about five inches shorter than a late-model Camaro. Front seat passengers were enveloped in splendor with leather-covered bucket seats, wood trim, and wool carpeting, but the rear seats were confined. The huge rear hatch had substantial luggage space. A convertible version appeared 1974.

In addition to the 360, some 440-powered Interceptors were made, and the Hemi was under experimentation (the cost to bring the suspension up to speed, not to mention to import the practically handmade 426 Hemi, would have been prohibitive).

Jensen not only made a 440 Interceptor, they also made a 440 Six Pack interceptor, the extremely rare Interceptor SP. This may have been offered in both two wheel drive and FF form, but SP FFs are not believed to have made it out of single digits.

The British ITC TV series "Return of the Saint" used an Interceptor as Simon Templar's car, with the traditional "ST 1" license plate. Jensen-built cars seem to have been a tradition in the Saint TV series, with Roger Moore driving a Jensen-built Volvo P1800 in the original.

Interceptor Convertible


Interceptor Coupe
 

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Yabbadabado, I would love to have this car in 1:18! :hot

When I was a boy, I thought this to be one of the coolest cars on the block!
 
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My dad had one similar before i was born (man, my dad was cool when he was a virgin :giggle ) His was black though. Would love to buy one for him as a gift.
 

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Another "must"! There was a guy that cruised out hang-out back in the mid-80's that had one. He had made his own SP from over-the-counter parts. That thing could light up the tires!
 

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I'd love to see a coupe, but hopefully they'd do the classic shape, and not the later one with that ugly roof (see the silver one above).
 

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My great Uncle had both the Interceptor and the FF. The FF was metallic dark blue and the Interceptor III in Lime green with a black vinyl roof. So yes we need these, in both major scales.

Jensen FF:
 
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