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I also don‘t like some of their latest models that much.
But I think it‘s not fair to say it‘s all bad.
Recently I got me the Black Prince and it is a great piece of diecast.
I have nothing to complain and frankly, I love it!
 

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It is now confirmed. RM Sotheby’s sold the 300 SLR on behalf of Mercedes, to a private owner... They started the auction at 50 million.

They sold the red inerior car, being less historically significant than the blue interior car.
Absolutely amazing, 135 million euro. Then again, try finding another one to buy!! Wonder if the new owner is going to drive it down to the shops to buy milk?
 

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I'm very intrigued as to the reason the chose to sell it.
I know what they are claiming, and it's a pretty hefty value at €135 million, but are Mercedes stuck for cash? :giggle:
Not really - they file several billion Euros profit quarter by quarter.
Even the impressive price of €135 is just peanuts for them.
Hard to understand what was driving this decision...
 

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And there are still BBR 375 models in the market at reasonable prices.
Doesn't seem a wise choice by CMC...(?)
Yes, considerably cheaper than most CMCs, even the Le Mans winning #4 livery, and in my opinion, BBR's leather straps are superior to CMC, in look and durability too, at least they feel like they won't tear as easily as CMC leather straps.
 

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Yes, considerably cheaper than most CMCs, even the Le Mans winning #4 livery, and in my opinion, BBR's leather straps are superior to CMC, in look and durability too, at least they feel like they won't tear as easily as CMC leather straps.
The hood straps on my BBR 375 tore, and I've seen a few others on here with torn straps. My experience is that CMCs are much more durable than BBRs. But still, the BBR 375 is an outstanding model, especially for the less than half the price that this CMC will be - I paid under $300 for mine.

So yes, CMC is definitely wasting their time. I would much rather them make the 250 Lusso, 330 GT, one that BBR only made in resin. But if it's gonna be $650+, inaccurate, and riddled with quality control mishaps... maybe not 🤷‍♂️
 

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Well, there are so many beautiful Ferraris from the 60s where no decent diecast is abvailable:
250LM, several 250TRs, 250 GT Drogo, 290MM and many more...
I would also love to see a 166MM by CMC.

And a Cisitalia 202 would be great too...
 

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I have 2 BBR 375 Plus, the Le mans version and the "plain red" version because they have a lot of differences. I will pass on this CMC as the detail on the BBRs are outstanding especially for their price. Again, I do not know who is deciding their choice of models but with their current lineup I will be passing on most CMCs for the next couple of years.
 

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I have 2 BBR 375 Plus, the Le mans version and the "plain red" version because they have a lot of differences. I will pass on this CMC as the detail on the BBRs are outstanding especially for their price. Again, I do not know who is deciding their choice of models but with their current lineup I will be passing on most CMCs for the next couple of years.
Agreed. CMC has rapidly closed on Exoto as the source of models priced well outside of my range and usually outside of my interests with them consistently picking more obscure (or older) and less competition-oriented subject matter. That's not to completely dismiss the recent 275 GTB variants (it stirred enough hearts that there obviously IS great interest in that particular choice), but I've seen many posts labeling that as a near-miss with other Ferraris being listed as preferable. Likewise the announced Porsche 904, the closest to my desired era and subject matter (and the Uhlenhauts are always a win-win). But at the listed prices, I'll be passing, apparently from this point on....

Of course, there are many people whose tastes are being satisfied by CMC's selections - and I recognize that as a fan of more modern racing-only cars I am very much a niche customer - and I am delighted that there is a manufacturer not catering to the mass obsession with supercars. But I can still dream about some of the cars I'd like to see memorialized with a quality full-featured diecast recreation:

Ferrari 250P - Ferrari's first mid-engined racer and the first rear-engined car to win Le Mans debuted in 1963 by winning the Sebring 12 Hours, Le Mans 24 Hours and Nürburgring 1000 Km., then the same chassis with larger engines (275P) doubled in 1964 with wins again at Sebring and Le Mans and both years featured highly in North American sports car races, including winning the prestigious Canadian GP (at Mosport, then for sports cars) and Quebec Trophy (Mont Tremblant).

Car Tire Vehicle Wheel Hood
Car Tire Vehicle Wheel Automotive design

Left: The Ludovico Scarfiotti/Lorenzo Bandini 250 P on it way to victory in the 1963 Le Mans 24 Hours; Right: The SAME chassis, #0816, would return with a 3.3-liter engine as a 275 P to win the 1964 24 Hours of Le Mans, driven by Nino Vaccarella and Jean Guichet (after having also won the 1964 12 hours of Sebring for Mike Parkes and Umberto Maglioli!).

Ferrari 250LM - The intended successor to the 250 GTO as Ferrari's next generation GT competitor was not homologated as such in 1964 - despite threats from Ferrari to withdraw from races, including F1 - because insufficient numbers of the car were produced. As a result, it was forced to compete as a Prototype class vehicle against Ferrari's and other's much faster cars and didn't fare well. Most of the model were sold to customers rather than campaigned by the factory and many received the larger 3.3-liter V-12 over the initial 3-liter engine (the vehicle was never relabeled the more accurate "275LM", however). Two private "275LMs" finished 1-2 in the 12 Hours of Reims (beating three Ford GT40s) in the only significant win of the season. But in 1965, the "275LMs" would take advantage of all the other prototypes retiring to finish 1-2-6 in the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

And we will all probably drop dead before Exoto releases this one, despite all the promises and pre-production photos...
Wheel Vehicle Tire Car Hood
Car Wheel Vehicle Tire Hood

Left: Maranello Concessionaires entered this 250LM in which Graham Hill and Jo Bonnier won the 1964 12 Hours of Reims. Right: American Masten Gregory at the wheel of the North American Racing Team-entered 250LM he and future World Driving Champion Jochen Rindt drove to win the 1965 24 hours of Le Mans.

Mercedes C11 - The successor to the all-conquering Sauber-Mercedes C9 of 1989, this Group C powerhouse swept all before it in 1990. In the nine-race season, the model's planned debut at Suzuka was foiled by a crash in practice (backup C9s would finish 1-2 in the race). In the other eight races, C11s won seven (with four 1-2s) with only a rare engine failure and a disqualification at Silverstone preventing a clean sweep.
Car Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive design

Jochen Mass and Michael Schumacher's Mercedes C11 during their win in the season-ending Mexico World Sports Prototype Championship race.

Just my wishlist for CMC!
 

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I'd like a 1967 Ford MKIV Le Mans winner.
The Exoto is FAR too expensive these days plus I think the front ride height is wrong.
The Shelby is too poor a model for such a significant part of history.
The upcoming Spark is sealed resin, I will only get one if at a decent discount.
 
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