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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have never been able to take that great clear non flash photo of my 1/43rd models can anyone out there give us some advice would be much appreciated
Thanks
:confused
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
any thoughts, is camera good enough and what do you think of photo ?

Ciao
:feedback
 

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It seems that your Coolpix 7600 can take some decent macro photos so I think you're set there. I don't think the 7600 lets you adjust the aperture though so you may have trouble getting the whole car in focus.

The first time I tried photographing a 1/43rd diecast was a few months ago so this is new to me too. Never use flash when taking macro shots, it just washes everything out. Instead, use lamp or desk light. Get a nice smooth piece of white paper and curve it between the bottom(say your desk) and a wall to create a smooth transition in the background. Another tip is to use a tripod or set your camera for it's 10 or 2 second auto timer so you don't have any camera shake. Felix(StygianMax) knows more about this anyone so he should be able to help a lot more than I can! In fact, no one does it better.

Here's my try at a 1/43rd :giggle :cheers

 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
One other hint, if I may: try do shoot a little further from the model, because the closer you shoot, the less depth of field you get (depth of field, or DOF, in simple words is the amount of distance where everything looks sharp). If you move the camera a little further, you'll have more DOF. Later, in Photoshop or whatever software you may use, you'll be able to crop the photo so that the model fills the whole frame.
:cheers
 

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I would agree with what's been said so far.

Firstly, learn how to disable the flash on your camera - unless you have a good quality flash with a diffuser, it's unlikely to give nice results using it because it reflects and glares off the model. You will also want a tripod to keep the camera absolutely steady- a mini tabletop one would do.

After that, a basic card background (as Justin explained) to get rid of background distractions, and ideally some sort of lighting. If you want to keep it cheap, go outside or in a nice bright room and use natural sunlight. If you are willing to spend more, you can buy a 'light tent'/softbox which the model sits inside. This diffuses the light all around to remove harsh shadows and highlights :cheers
 

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Hey alfa....sorry for the late reply back to you. Jayfield's is quite right. To get as much of the car in focus from the front to back, you are best off to position your camera further away from the model. Setting the camera on a tripod is ideal to minimize vibration (which results in poorer focus). Use as much optical zoom (no digital) as you can to fill out your viewfinder (LCD screen in your case) to compose your photo. Although the camera specs says you can take pictures as close as 4 cm, you might want to try from a distance of 20 to 35 cm (that's what I typically use for shooting 1/43 models). I think what I would try it to attempt to take the pics at 2x zoom. The more zoom you use, the more light is lost traveling through the lens of the camera (I hope this isn't getting too technical!).

As for lighting, try to go for natural sunlight. Even if it's overcast, that's okay. As long as the light is diffused, then you won't get nasty glare spots off our model's windows and body. Oh, and find a way for force your flash off. They're terrible for diecast photography. :shipwrecked

If you are using artificial lighting, remember to adjust your camera setting to suit. Apparently you can chose between (a) Fine (not sure what that really means :confused , (b) Fluorescent and © Incandescent. Personally, of the different artificial types of lights, I prefer halogen because it mimics sunlight the best.

Here's my set-up with a 1/18 model. For the photo shoot, I would turn off the light aimed at the ceiling and just use the lights on the two "arms" to control the lighting. The set-up is really nothing fancy and is pretty inexpensive. If you look closely, you can see my tripod in front of the model. If you have any questions, feel free to ask. :cheers

 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
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The nikon coolpix 7600 is about 6iches long by 4 inches high and not that heavy, great coments by you all and i must thankyou all for you info and more would be much appreciated
regards
alfa156vale46
:cheers
 

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A mini tripod would probably be suitable as long as it wasn't a really cheap one in that case.

My only advice left to give would be to experiment and practice. Different people use different combinations of the various equipment that has been posted, and they can all give good results. If I was you, I would start with getting some card for the background and a tripod - they won't cost much. Then try that setup out under different lighting conditions - natural and artificial :cheers
 
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