DiecastXchange Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So i just got this in today and in my rush to open up the door and examine the interior, I broke off the right side mirror (i usually use the side mirror as a lever to open the doors on my AAs since the shutlines are tight and i haven't had a problem yet). Can anyone let me know what type of glue i should use. The mirror itself is black plastic, it attaches to a black plastic area on the window. I need something that won't discolor or melt the plastic. Any ideas??

:rock :rock
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
I know that this might be a pain in the behind, but is it possible to use a pin drill to put small holes in the mirror base and the door, and use a pin to hold the joint together. You could then put a drop of liquid cement into the join to seal it.
That would make the joint stronger than before..not entirely sure what the cement would do to the plastic, as some are designed to melt the plastic to create the join. :cheers
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
watch out for that liquid cement glue (super glue, or whatever). if it gets to the paint it destroys once and for all the laquer and you'll regret it. So, be extra careful!

and always glue the "negative part". I mean the one with the protrusion, if there is one :cheers
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
can anyone recommend a brand/type of glue that wont melt or discolor black plastic??

thanks
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Happen to me a few times..I use the Tamiya cement, there are 2 types: normal and thin. Both can be use. Just apply to the area where you want to adhere. It will melt the plastic/paint also, so just be careful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Hi, I've had many cars with broken mirrors and successfully reattached them so that they're even stronger than original. Originally I would just glue them on but they would break off with slight pressure. I realized that the glue just doesn't have enough surface area contact to give any strength. If you did use enough glue it would be a sizable blob and very disfiguring. I thought about it and realized the only way to make a solid repair is to reinforce it, like rebar in concrete.

I do just what bennyjammin suggests, and that is to drill holes in both the mirror and stalk using microdrills. These can be picked up on eBay quite cheaply. Get the ones with the plastic collar used for drilling printed circuit boards (PCBs). They have large shanks (the part that mounts in the drill chuck) making them easier to handle and use by hand. Depending on the diameter of the stalk I'll use a drill size from between #69 to #78 (larger the number the smaller the drill).

I use solid wire to make the pin. You can buy this wire from a craft store (the type they use for doing wire art, avail in diff diameters) or save the insulated wire that is used to secure down toys and other objects in display packaging, but strip off the clear insulation first. Find a drill size that matches the wire diameter. I use a size a bit smaller and work my way up sizes until the wire is a snug fit.

The trickiest part is centering the drill in the stalk, and making sure the matching hole in the mirror is in the right place too, so that they align properly. Take time to work slowly at the beginning to get the right location. It's much better to do it slow so you can catch any misalignments early when they're still fixable. I always do the hole in the stalk first, and then carefully eyeball the hole in relation to the stalk to make sure I place the hole correctly in the mirror. I drill the hole as deep as I dare, without breaking out on the other side. The deeper the hole the more wire inserted and the stronger the joint. I would recommend a minimum depth of twice the wire diameter, if possible.

Test fit the hole with a piece of wire as you go along. This will ensure there won't be any major misalignments. Try to drill in as straight as you can, concentric with the stalk. It's okay if the wire is slightly crooked because you can bend it where it protrudes out.

When you think you're finished drilling, insert the piece of wire, trim it down to the right length so that the mirror fits on and the two broken surfaces mate up. For glue I use the thin runny version of superglue (cyanoacrylate). Remove the mirror and the pin, grasp one end of the pin with tweezers or needle nose pliers and then apply a very small amount of the superglue to the exposed end of the pin. You DO NOT need a lot of glue. If the fit of the pin is snug, a microscopic amount of glue is all you'll need. Superglue is also stronger is less is used. Insert the pin into the hole in the stalk. This should set within seconds. Now do the same with the superglue and exposed end of the pin and insert the mirror. Make sure the two broken faces meet securely. A tiny amount of superglue should have been squeezed out on to the mating surfaces, bonding them as well. If you apply too much glue, wick away the excess with the corner of a facial tissue or toilet paper square. Enough will be left behind to do the job.

Eyeball the alignment and make any final adjustments. Note again, use very little glue! It's better to have to make another pin and reglue than to try to remove excess superglue - it's very nasty stuff to get off. If you get any on your fingers stop immediately and clean it off. This is not just due to safety. If you handle the car with traces of glue on your fingers your car will become a permanent record of your fingerprints.

I've also used this method to repair broken suspension arms and linkages. I received a really poorly packed Kyosho Lancia Stratos. All 4 susp corners had experienced damage, and on the rear both sides lower A-arms had snapped clean off, and the shock/spring struts snapped as well. I tried gluing a couple of pieces without reinforcement and they immediately broke when any load was applied. I used the technique above and was able to completely repair the car. The breaks are still visible as hairline cracks but at the least the car is one piece again.

Tools you'll need:
Micro drills - I recommend buying a complete set from size #60 to #80 (get spares if you can because they break very easily - try not to put any side loads at all while drilling)
Tweezers or needle nose pliers to hold the pin
Sidecutters for trimming the pin to length (you could use a Dremel instead, but if you have Dremel I think you'd have sidecutters)
Thin superglue (I use Loctite 420 with the long slender nozzle)
Toilet or facial tissue paper
Good strong light source
Magnifying glass (if you're old and your eyesight is going like mine)

If somebody will tell me how to imbed a photo in here I'll post some pics of my repairs.

Hope this helps.

DYW
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
DYW...wow! Thank you for your reply. I remember doing this a couple of times for some applications back when I used to build 1/24 scale models. The thought never crossed my mind for the 1:18. I'll have to see what i can scare up! Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post][/right]
You are most welcome! Anything I can do to help! If you want to see some photos of what some repaired ones look like I'll gladly put some on my webspace and link into a post here. I've successfully repaired mirrors on Exoto Sauber C9s (at least 4 or 5 - I have 4 of the C9s - they seem to be extremely fragile), Kyosho Ferrari 365GT4/Bburago, 328GTB QV, AUTOart BMW Z8, and susp parts on the previously mentioned Stratos, along with broken linkages and A-arms on Exoto Lotus 49s and Tyrrell 003s.

I'm also thinking of applying the same technique to make the cowlings on the 1:6 Minichamps Ducati bikes removable. The bikes have great detail but Minichamps couldn't figure a way to make the cowlings removable on the 996 and 998s, while the newer models like the Desmodeci and RC211Vs are removable. I was going to cut through the original mounting tabs, which appear to be glued to the frame, drill and insert pins. To make the pins stay put a bit better I was going to use a slightly oversized pin and turn one end down (chuck it in a Dremel) to form a slight bulb at the other end. This bulb would be the part that inserts into the hole in the frame. I'd have to engineer it properly, so that the bulb part goes in far enough that the back edge catches on the hole opening. There might have to be further modifications of the lower cowling since it's one piece, unless the fact that it's plastic will allow me to flex it enough to provide clearance to insert the pins.

I'll post some pics to show how successful I am once I get around to trying it.

Cheers,
DYW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Posting an example of the repair method I talk about above. Both my friend and I have the Minichamps 1:6 Ducati Desmo 2003. The upper fairing on his was loose and "flappy" on the left side so I took a look at it and found the locating pin mounted to the fairing had broken off. The broken off piece was still in the frame so I drilled a small hole in the end, screwed in a really tiny self tapping screw and extracted it.

Here are thumbnails showing my repair:
Shot of inside surface of fairing on the good (right) side, showing how it should look:

This is a pic of the opposite side, with the broken off pin. I've already drilled a hole to receive the reinforcement.

This is a pic of the broken off pin with the reinforcement (a bit of a big paperclip) inserted and glued using thin superglue. I previously drilled a hole in the end of the broken pin to receive the paperclip wire, like I did for the piece on the frame. I'll cut off most of the paperclip, leaving enough to insert into the hole in the fairing

Test fitting before final assembly with thin superglue:

Final repair, securely glued in place:

Repaired fairing mounted back on bike:


Total repair time was about 15mins. Having the right tools really helps of course.

DYW
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top