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Looking again at your Pullman pictures I noticed that your model has a perfect ride height.

However many pictures in the web show models that seem to sit too high on the front wheels (while rear wheels are ok) - at least my impression.
==> Did you something to correct the front ride height or is your sample just a lucky catch?
 

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Discussion Starter · #227 ·
Looking again at your Pullman pictures I noticed that your model has a perfect ride height.

However many pictures in the web show models that seem to sit too high on the front wheels (while rear wheels are ok) - at least my impression.
==> Did you something to correct the front ride height or is your sample just a lucky catch?
Correct the ride height of my Pullman is perfectly leveled between front and rear. However the left side is slightly lower than the right side (still leveled) but this is hardly noticeable.

I have seen right height issues on the net. How is your White Swan?
 

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Discussion Starter · #228 ·
Quite impressed by your 1960s Ferrari collection. I like how it spans across multiple model makers and beyond just diecast.
Thanks for the good words, I love this period for Ferrari. It is important for me to have some detailed diecast models but for more unique subject matters the resin makers are a must.
 

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I have seen right height issues on the net. How is your White Swan?
The model is breathtaking - my only criticism is that it too high on the front wheels (that was my reason to ask).

Meanwhile I took off one front wheel (5 micro hex screws 1.5mm!) and had a closer look to the suspension.
The problem should be relatively easy to fix:
There is a screw with a hex nut where you can adjust the ride height (!)
Have never seen something ingenious like this before on a 1/18 model!


Now I need only a fitting micro socket wrench (2.0mm) to finish the job...
(Of course there is a micro socket wrench delivered with the model. But this one fits only to the 1.5mm wheel nuts and not for the 2.0mm adjustment of the ride.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #231 ·
It's been an eternity since I last posted an update to my collection. I received many models but I haven't had the oppportunity to take proper pictures. Not sure I will be able to play catch up but at least let me show you what I received this week. Let's start with this Autoart Bugatti Chiron Sport. Bugatti unveiled this track focus version at the 2018 Geneva International Motor Show. It has a firmer chassis setting combined with lightweight components to provide sharper handling and better agility. This beautiful Jet Grey and Blue combo is in my opinion the best among the versions proposed by AUTOart. A great spec that perfectly highlights the character of this ultimate super sport car.











 

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Discussion Starter · #232 · (Edited)
Back in the mid-1950s Ferrari was still far from series production. All vehicles were still delivered as a chassis to famous Carrozzeria (Coachbuilders) where they were given a matching and often very individual body. Both the racing cars and the road sports cars were crafted in this way. The new 375 MM with its 4.6 liter Lampredi V12 was at the time the most potent chassis that Ferrari was offering to private racing teams.

Two one-off road cars were built on that chassis by Pininfarina. The best known is certainly 0456AM, also known as the "Bergman-Ferrari" presented at the 1954 Paris Auto Show. The second one-off, chassis 0490AM was built for the 1955 Turin Show in a different style. The aluminum body of the 375 MM Berlinetta Speciale had an oval shaped grill design in the front clearly reminiscent of the 375 racing sports cars of the period. But it looked unfamiliar for a road car. Above the rear wheels the body had a slight swing of the hips ending in the rear fins and indicators. The interior was simple but offered a minimum of comfort. Overall it was a real super sports car made for the road.

CMF did several interesting one-off Ferrari pieces in the past but this one the first I get from them. Comparing it with pictures of the original car it seems they did it quite well. Quality is good, paint is smooth and nice details have been added all around. It's a bit hard to see on my pictures but the roof is dark blue metallic. On the flip side the front grille is a bit too thick. And the wire wheels on this model are not the best. Metal spokes are too wide and flat. However I plan to replace them by BBR wheels which should improve the model a lot. Overall I really like this unique piece and if you like vintage Ferrari I can recommend this model.









 

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Nice to see the grey Chiron, personally i prefer the ones with carbon but the exterior and interior fits well on grey, only wonder if it would be this popular if there wasn't a rich guy specced his Chiron like this and drive it in London
 

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Love the styling of this 375 MM Coupe Speciale Pininfarina, which looks fairly similar to the 410 SuperAmerica which I already have by HWE. I didn't know such a model existed, maybe something I have to seriously consider.

On another note, are the wire spoke rims by BBR really that much better than this? I got the impression that BBR's wire spoke rims are also a little 2D when compared to those found on CMC and Kyosho's 250 GTO.
 

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Congrats on the 375! It is a stunning model and ordered one myself recently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #237 ·
Awesome collection so far (y)
Thanks. Glad you like it.
Nice to see the grey Chiron, personally i prefer the ones with carbon but the exterior and interior fits well on grey, only wonder if it would be this popular if there wasn't a rich guy specced his Chiron like this and drive it in London
I like the Chiron with carbon but I feel the carbon does not translate perfectly in 1:18 as it lacks depth.
I agree that monochrome grey with blue interior spec works very well on the car. Actually I didn’t know a guy in London spec’d his car like that until I ordered my model !
Love the styling of this 375 MM Coupe Speciale Pininfarina, which looks fairly similar to the 410 SuperAmerica which I already have by HWE. I didn't know such a model existed, maybe something I have to seriously consider.

On another note, are the wire spoke rims by BBR really that much better than this? I got the impression that BBR's wire spoke rims are also a little 2D when compared to those found on CMC and Kyosho's 250 GTO.
The style looks similar to the 410 SuperAmerica especially the front. But actually the rest of the car shares more similarities with the 250 TDF from 1957-1958. I think the inspiration from the 250TDF actually came from the 375MM Coupe Speciale.

Wire rims from BBR are on a complete different level. Spokes are also flat but they are 1/2 to 1/3 the width of the CMF, huge difference! And the rims are aluminum just like CMC.
Congrats on the 375! It is a stunning model and ordered one myself recently.
Thanks. You will love it, it’s a great model.
 

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Four copies only of the Ferrari 330 LMB racing car were build in 1963. LMB stands for Le Mans Berlinetta. They were essentially a development of the 250 GTO fitted with a 4-liter 330 engine. Although the front of the car is visually similar to the 250 GTO the main structure came from a modified 250 GT Lusso chassis/body. The side profile and rear bears some striking resemblances with the Lusso. But the wheelbase is actually longer than both the Lusso the 250 GTO. The raised plates on the top of the rear fenders were actually necessary to clear the rear tires.

The 330 LMB did not see much racing, as Ferrari was moving over to the mid-engined layout for racing with the 250 P. One 330 LMB retired at Sebring 1963, while of three starters at Le Mans that year, two retired. But the car from the team Maranello Concessionaires (UK) finished 5th overall with the drivers Jack Sears and Mike Salmon. This is the car (S/N 4725SA) presented here in scale.

The model is made by Technomodel in sealed resin. It is well done although the interior and some details may look a bit plain. As a typical Technomodel the historic accuracy of the car is a bit questionable. Several details from the race day car did not make it to scale. It will probably bother the Ferrari purists but I am fine with it. The originality of the subject matter and its rarity largely makes up for the few inaccuracies. I got it under MSRP, no tax and no fees so I can't complain. Enjoy the pictures.
It's great to see you posting on DX again, Arnage; I always appreciated your racing model photography and history!

It's also nice that you're one of the rare few who recognizes the 330 LMB for its significance as the intended successor to the 250 GTO. Your #12 was possibly the fastest car in a straight line at Le Mans in 1963 (faster than the prototypes!). I have the Technomodel version of the North American Racing Team (N.A.R.T.) car that Dan Gurney drove to 3rd overall in the fall 1963 Bridgehampton 500:

Wheel Vehicle Car Tire Hood


The #47 was the same chassis Gurney and Jim "Chaparral" Hall drove in the 24 Hours of Le Mans that same year for N.A.R.T. (wearing #11, in the same classic red as your #12), running as high as 3rd place before breaking a half-shaft around the tenth hour. I was disappointed that Tecnomodel released the other Le Mans LMBs but not the #11.
 

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Discussion Starter · #239 ·
Thanks Red! Glad to see you are visiting my thread and appreciate my small write-ups on racing models. Since the end of last year I mostly lacked time and somehow motivation to take pictures and post but will try to get back at it. My collection focus is mainly road cars. But I have a sweet spot for Ferrari from the 50’s and 60’s and love their glorious racing cars from the period. I would collect them all if I could.

The 330 LMB was indeed an intended successor to the 250 GTO for the new 4-liter class. And yes it was the first car to break the 300km/h at Le Mans in 1963 during the test days. But the 4-liter GTs were outclassed in almost every other aspect by their nimbler 3-liter cousins which ended their brief carrer.

Your 330 LMB N.A.R.T. has a very interesting history. And in this unique gold livery it is a thing of beauty. Too bad Tecnomodel did not release the #11 and still made they usual non-sense plain red version.
 

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Discussion Starter · #240 ·
After a 3-months break I am back at taking pictures of my models. Since I received several more this year I have a bit of a backlog... Let's stay with vintage Ferrari from the 50's each one more beautiful than the other. I am presenting here this BBR Ferrari 250 TDF from 1958. The model is from their BBR18 lineup (vintage Ferrari models made in Italy). Gorgeous car and beautiful model with a perfect paint, metal chromed bumper and a great finish all around. My first add of 2021 actually (yes 2021, this is not a typo).












 
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