DiecastXchange Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let me ask you a quick question before we start. Have you ever wanted to buy a car without the body? Yeah.. I thought so. That wasn't my intentions with this, but the second I heard the story behind this car and what it was, you can't ignore it. I'll tell you the story as we go on, starting the review with the box..





Not what you were expecting eh? First thing that grabs you is the intricate box which gives off a rashed leather look with stitching holding it all together. Gold lettering and a faded picture of the actual car adorn the front. Second is the size..



For someone who doesn't own a GMP roadrunner that box is a little bit smaller than an average Autoart enclosed box. I love how this box was done, use the bare amount of space needed to get the job done. At the same time though, it gives a 1:24 scale feel to it. Do I care? No, this box is perfect any way I see and a beautiful piece worthy of display. Technically you can as both this box and the car can fit in one space on a 12 car hanging display case.





Also included are of course a Certificate of Authenticity and a really interesting booklet all about the car. I almost took pictures of all the pages it's that interesting. 18,000 of these were made but I don't really call that limited edition.



Let me first show you what this car used to look like before Peter got a hand of it. I couldn't find any confirmed information but I can take a good guess that the one he bought was a late '20s, early '30s model. Thank you Google..





Let me start by saying there isn't much I can say at this stage because I usually talk about paint and the body. There really isn't any paint or body to talk about, so I'll just skip this part.



Only things up front are the grille and a good view of the suspension. The grille is through with a paper thin Austin emblem on the grille with full metal chrome surround, hand-crank not included..



Around back you have the same problem as the front, not much to talk about that won't be mentioned later. What can be seen are the rear axle and the seats. Yes, I said seats, as in more than one.



The wire wheels are a beautiful barely noticeable single cast piece on incredibly thin tires. The wheels bring to me an important question. Was this car all white? or something else with white wheels? I've seen all kinds while searching, so who knows? I think it adds character.





Here we have the interior, or exterior, however you see it.. Either way, it is as bare bones as you can get. Other than your average seat and working steering wheel, you have a passenger seat made out of a wooden plank, a battery for the seat mount, wooden floorboards with gaps in them and even more wood as a shifter box. Very noteworthy is that this car does not have a brake pedal. Peter Brock would slow down by downshifting or drifting into the corner. Now that's balls.. Another thing is that all the wood on this car except for the "seat" is made of real wood.







Here we are to the best part of almost any diecast car, Except for Minichamps, newer Kyosho's, Maisto, ERTL, Welly and Jada. What we have here is a 0.7 Liter inline four engine making most likely some 5 horsepower and -1 foot pound of torque. For an I4 engine, this is amazingly detailed. I know I won't stop saying things like "this is the best engine I've ever seen" or things like that in my other reviews but look at this thing! You know the second you saw this car you immediately saw the engine. Plug wires, mounts, springs, you name it. It's so amazing I have no idea what to talk about. Noteable mentions are the real copper tube and tusted exhaust.



While there is no trunk, you could nail your things to the back of the seat? Or tie them around the axle?



The all metal undercarriage really isn't anything you've already seen. You do get a slightly better view of the suspension, drive components and the model specifics can be seen under the seat. No brake lines, no floor pans, no nothing.. Is it still awesome? Obviously.





These pictures I provided for size. This Volvo is a bit smaller than your standard Autoart at a bit over nine inches long. I will be doing this Volvo next by the way.

It is impossible to really explain why I bought this vehicle. I can explain why this has to be in any diecast collection, the story of it. You know that no matter how many diecast cars you have, whether it fills your room or a small shelf, everyone is going to talk about this one. This won't fit in any collection or group, but that's why it's here, it gives individuality. Only problem I see is that it is dangerously close to a 1:24 scale size. That was the real size of the car though, so it can't be helped. I personally think it is a great addition to my collection and a great deal money wise.

All said and done, Biante has exceeded expectations and should make more weird models like this.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,366 Posts
No need to justify your purchase to us Rush ....this is a fantastic model that tells a whole lotta story!
Congratulations!
....and thanks for sharing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,575 Posts
Fantastic review Rush... Thanks for taking your time to share this with us all...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,178 Posts
A crazy model but splendid too, another great review mate & excellent back story as always.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,417 Posts
Now that is one really cool model, thank you for sharing this model here, I would never get this model for my own collection but it is a very cool part automotive history, and I am happy to see you bringing it here to share it with all of us.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top