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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Bae Hawk T1
The Hawk first entered service with the RAF in 1976, both as an advanced flying-training aircraft and a weapons-training aircraft. The Hawk T1 version is currently used at RAF Valley for fast-jet pilot advanced flying training with No 208® Squadron, and at RAF Scampton by the RAF Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows. The T1A is used for weapons and tactical training on No 19® Squadron at RAF Valley, and by No 100 Squadron at RAF Leeming for advanced fast-jet weapons systems officer training and operational support- flying. In its weapons and tactical training role the Hawk is used to teach air combat, air-to-air firing, air-to-ground firing and low-flying techniques and operational procedures.

The Hawk is an all-metal, low-wing, tandem seat aircraft of conventional design. The wing has a moderate sweep with 2º dihedral and trailing edge slotted flaps. A one-piece all-moving tailplane is also swept back with 10º dihedral. The fuselage comprises three main parts. The front fuselage accommodates two equipment bays and a pressurised cabin containing two tandem cockpits. The centre fuselage contains the engine, a fuselage fuel tank, a gas turbine starting system and a ram air turbine; the latter providing emergency hydraulic power should the two normal hydraulic systems fail. The rear fuselage houses the jet pipe bay and an airbrake hinged to its under surface.

The Hawk is powered by a Rolls- Royce Turbomeca Adour 151 turbofan engine, which is an un-reheated version of the engine powering the Jaguar GR3 aircraft.
While the Hawk T1 is used solely in the advanced flying-training role, the Hawk T1A is equipped to an operational standard and is capable of undertaking a number of war roles. The T1A has two under-wing pylons cleared to carry BL755 cluster bombs or Sidewinder AIM-9L air-to-air missiles, and can carry a 30mm Aden cannon in a pod underneath the fuselage centre-line. The cannon can be fired at the same time as any of the pylon-mounted weapons are selected for release or firing. Aiming facilities for the aircraft's attack modes are provided by an integrated strike and interception system, while a Vinten video recording system is used to record the weapon sighting.

The next generation Hawk aircraft, the Hawk 128, will enter service in 2008 as a replacement for some of the current Hawk TMk1s. The Hawk 128 will introduce student pilots to the digital cockpit environment they will experience in front-line operational service and will provide a seamless transition between basic flying training, and operational conversion training onto advanced fighter aircraft such as the Typhoon F2 and the Joint Combat Aircraft.

The Red Arrows Team

The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, was initially based at RAF Fairford, Gloucestershire, then a satellite unit of CFS. The first team had seven display pilots and were equipped with the Folland Gnat jet trainer. At the end of their first season, the Team had performed 65 displays in Britain, France, Italy, Holland, Belgium and Germany and were awarded the Britannia Trophy by the Royal Aero Club in recognition of their outstanding contribution in the field of aviation.

When it was decided to continue the Team in 1966, two spare pilots were established but the Team continued to fly just seven aircraft in displays. The practice of carrying spare pilots proved unsatisfactory because the display is so specialised that each position has its own demands and requires much practice to perfect. A spare pilot, who must be capable of filling any position at very short notice, requires more training than any other member of the team, and as a result becomes more skilled. He then becomes dissatisfied with his role as a reserve.

In 1968 the Team was increased in size to nine and adopted the classical Diamond Nine formation which has come to represent the peak of precision flying: it is now the Team's Trade Mark and is recognised world-wide.

The Red Arrows took delivery of the Hawk trainer in the Winter of 1979/80. During that Winter the pilots converted from the Gnat and worked up a display using the new aeroplane in time for the 1980 Summer Display Season. Since being introduced into service with the Red Arrows, the Hawk has taken the Team on tours of Eastern and Western Europe, the USA, the Middle and Far East, Africa and Australia - in all the Red Arrows have displayed in 50 countries

Normally each pilot, including the Leader, stays with the Team for three seasons, and in this way maximum expertise is retained within the Team from year to year. The Synchro Pair, Reds 6 and 7, perform the highly popular solo manoeuvres in the second half of the display. They provide extra excitement and ensure that there is always some activity going on in front of the crowd whilst the Team Leader is re-positioning the remaining aircraft for their next flypast. There is one other qualified Hawk pilot, Red 10, the Team Manager. He flies the 10th Hawk to displays away from base, ready for use in case one of the others becomes unserviceable, but he never flies in public displays. The Manager gives the commentary at air displays during Red Arrows' performances.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
without doubt one of my favorite jets..............such a pretty aircraft and hihly manoverable...nice get Gaz :cheers
 

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Sweet! Cool looking plane! Great catch and great read to boot!

Sean
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Those guys in the pics of the 1:1 look like they are having a ton of fun.
 

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The Bae Hawk is one of my favourite jets too! Canada is now using a version of it, the Bae Systems Hawk 115 in NFTC (NATO Flight Training Canada) as the basic jet trainer along with the Harvard II turboprop as the basic trainer for transition to the jet. I have a 1/48 scale model of the Hawk 115 but I haven't gotten around to building it yet. Canada's Snowbirds are going to be looking for a new ride in a few years and the Hawk would make a great replacement. The only drawback is the loss of the Tutor Jet's uniqueness. Most of the top jet air demonstration teams fly jets not used by other teams.
 

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I'd love to see them. It's a rarity for them or any foreign teams to get to North America. I saw the French Patrouille de France and the Italian Tricolouri teams along with our Snowbirds at Canadian Forces Base North Bay in Ontario back in the 80's. I think the French were over here for a commeration of the Statue of Liberty in NY and then went on to the Abbotsford Air Show in BC.
 
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