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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Next up on my work bench is another Ferrari F40 upgrade, but this time the starting point is the Hotwheels version. In the main, the diecast parts are identical to the Bburago version although there are some differences, so they do not come from the same moulds. The plastic parts are all very similar albeit with differences that indicate they are from different moulds. Again, the model was bought cheaply on eBay and is the 60th anniversary version in red, but covered in hideous
"stickers".
Wheel Vehicle Car Tire Hood


Wheel Land vehicle Tire Vehicle Car


Originally I intended this to be a back burner project, but I wanted to see if it was possible to remove the "stickers" as a quick and dirty improvement. After much rubbing with polishing compounds, it looked like this. You can see the remains of the door sticker in the black stripe area.
Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Hood


After painting in the stripe in the doors, I was going to leave it at that for a while, but then decided to add the indicators to the wings using small "jewels" painted with Tamiya clear orange.
Wheel Tire Vehicle Land vehicle Car


After a bit of polishing it looked a whole lot better than when I received it. It had clearly been exposed to a lot of sunlight by a previous owner as all the clear parts have yellowed to a greater or lesser extent.
Wheel Tire Automotive parking light Car Vehicle


I new about the yellowed parts before I purchased so no complaints.
Vehicle Hood Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive design


As mentioned in my Bburago F40 upgrade discussion, I believe it is a better starting point for an upgrade project to produce a production version of the F40 than the Bburago is. Yellowing aside, it has the correct number of vents in the engine cover window, it has thr F40 scripts engraved in the right hand wing support plus a representation of the wing fixing bolts, 4 side vents in the rear clam, wheel arch inserts to the rear wheels, window frames in the doors, rear view mirrors on the doors, better instrument sticker on the dashboard, ducting to the cabin from the naca vents on the front clam and the correct wheel arch inserts. It also has a representation of the radiator, albeit it is too wide, too simplified and is attached to the clam and not the chassis. The springs and shocks while being non working are a much better effort than the Bburago's.
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Automotive design


It also has the reflectors at the rear which I believe were required for the American market.
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And the superior under bonnet detail.
Toy Automotive tire Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Car


In one respect, the area where Bburago did much better are the wheels. The typical, Bb wheels with the open centre are correct for this prototype, whereas the Hotwheels has closed nuts. This should be easy to correct though.
Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Land vehicle


And a quick comparison view along side my recently upgraded Bburago version.
Tire Automotive parking light Vehicle Car Wheel


Anyway enough of the pre amble and suffice to say that in terms of a full upgrade, I've moved it to the front of the queue and will be documenting the work in this thread.

Cheers,
Peter
 

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A nice project!
To remove decals and un-wanted side stripes on resin models I've scratched away at them with a tooth pick, they're soft enough to not ruin the paint, but also strong enough to dig away at the decals etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A nice project!
To remove decals and un-wanted side stripes on resin models I've scratched away at them with a tooth pick, they're soft enough to not ruin the paint, but also strong enough to dig away at the decals etc.
Thanks for that Craig. I'll bear it in mind.

This is the replacement rear window I sourced from CreationJMG. It's very thin and flimsy and the vents need to be opened up with a sharp blade. It's a bit of a disappointment and I I won't be using it. That said, I got a nice soft soft to go on my Ferrari F50 and some wing mirrors for a Jouef Ferrari P4 I intend to upgrade. He's got lots of nice stuff on his website and is a good trader as well. When I ordered the three items, it picked up the standard package charge at checkout. However, the owner emailed me to say as they were small items he could use an envelope at lower cost and refunded me 10 euros, so hats off to the guy.
Hood Grille Automotive design Automotive lighting Automotive tire


So for now I'm stuck with the yellowed HW window. I've given it a good rub down on both sides with sanding sponges and polished it up again and it is a little better. I'll do the same with the windscreen in case my attempt at making one doesn't off. It needs more work but I've left it for now. Can't do much about the cracks though. As it has been degraded by sunlight it's more brittle than normal.
Automotive tail & brake light Automotive parking light Grille Hood Automotive lighting


The door windows will be easier to deal with. Removal of the door panel allows the glass and frame to be removed.
Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Red Automotive tail & brake light


First I drilled holes around the perimeter of the frames.
Hood Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Bumper Rectangle


Then cut with a sharp blade to remove the unwanted glass and tidy up with the file.
Hood Automotive lighting Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive design


On the right, both windows have been removed and the frame tidied up. The model will represent a production version so will have a normal vertical type sliding window, non operational of course.
Water Hood Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Vehicle


I haven't decided if I'm going for a full repaint or not yet, but after modifying the door panel to suit the later models and painting, I had a quick dry run with the painted window frames.
Hood Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Red Automotive design


And a quick test with the door inserted into the body. It's a close fit between the door panel and the inner tub side, but the new panel overlay is only 10 thou plasticard and clears OK. Looks good and will be even better when B pillar and surrounds are painted. I'd prefer to keep the HW paint job as it's in good nick and is a better finish than I can achieve, but I haven't decided how far I want to go with this one.
Wheel Hood Tire Vehicle Car


As usual with HW, their assembly methods are not as modelling friendly as Bburago when it comes to taking apart. The main widow piece is riveted to the roof so has to have the rivets drilled to remove. It's got the earlier roof lining with diamond cushioning and the top of the roll over cage is visible. I think this was covered with a more normal smooth lining on the later production models.
Motor vehicle Hood Automotive lighting Automotive design Wood


I've also been fettling away on the chassis in my haphazard way of working. Separating the upper and lower wishbone assemblies to remove the front wheels is a real pain. They are held together with a column on the lower wishbone, which locks to the upper one with a rivet. The rivet is recessed so very difficult to remove. In the end I removed the columns with side cutters. I've replaced them with a 10BA nut embedded and fixed with CA on the underside of the lower wishbones. A 10BA cheesehead bolt is then inserted through the rivet holes in the top to lock them together.

Automotive lighting Bumper Gas Wood Automotive exterior


I have to say, the plastic used by HW is as bad as that used by Jouef in that it is relatively soft and does not file or sand down very well. Too much plasticiser in the mix I assume.
Automotive exterior Gas Composite material Auto part Engineering


And screwed together. The bolt head will be blackened later.
Wheel Tire Water Hood Automotive tire


As I want to add the radiator to the front frame, the wall of the luggage/spare wheel area needs to be modified to make room. The front curve was removed and a replacement made from brass sheet. Here it is after glueing in place with CA.
Yeah, I know I should have put some wood down before drilling out the side windows!
Motor vehicle Bumper Office equipment Automotive design Automotive tire


The dashboard and under bonnet parts come moulded together, but I've separated them to facilitate easier working. The support for the shocks and springs has had the master cylinders and the colostomy bag of an excuse for the washer bottle removed. The luggage compartment base has been cut from brass sheet and will be soldered in place after a bit more fettling. The soldering will need to be quick and accurate to avoid flashing off the CA with too much heat and poisoning myself.
Cutting mat Tool Bicycle part Bumper Wood


A quick dry fit suggests I should have room for the scratch built radiator.
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Hood


A quicker option would be to cut and splice the crappy HW item, but what the heck, ARE WE NOT MEN?
Automotive tire Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Wheel Vehicle


The brake discs and a couple of other items that don't need to be chromed, have been dunked in Domestos (Sodium Hypochlorite bleach) to remove it. I don't know what the mechanism of the reaction is, but it sure is quick. This was after about 10 minutes. If you've never done this before and decided to have a go, take care when using the bleach and wear gloves and eye protection. Wash off well with plenty of water after removing. Don't worry about leaving the parts in too long. I've overlooked to remove parts and left in overnight with no damage to the plastic.
Liquid Tableware Drinkware Cup Highball glass


Cheers,
Peter
 

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Nice to see the way your work is taking. The laborious option of dremelling out the windows and keeping the frames wouldn't be my first option (I'd rather just get the photoetched frames from the Tremonia kit and spray it flat black. But I liked the final result.

Ive' been using the bleach to remove chrome from plastic for a while and the speed at which it disolves the chrome plating will depend on the quality: there's been parts that as soon as I dip them in bleach, it immediately comes off, others I can keep them 3 or 4 days in and it won't budge. And yeah, it usually doesn't harm the plastic but I've known cases that if you keep the parts dipped for days on end they can start to get brittle.

One solution I use for steel disk brakes (weather vented on cross-drilled) is to cover the faces tith aluminium duct tape and fine sand it to give the impression it's been used. Think about it.;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Nice to see the way your work is taking. The laborious option of dremelling out the windows and keeping the frames wouldn't be my first option (I'd rather just get the photoetched frames from the Tremonia kit and spray it flat black. But I liked the final result.

Ive' been using the bleach to remove chrome from plastic for a while and the speed at which it disolves the chrome plating will depend on the quality: there's been parts that as soon as I dip them in bleach, it immediately comes off, others I can keep them 3 or 4 days in and it won't budge. And yeah, it usually doesn't harm the plastic but I've known cases that if you keep the parts dipped for days on end they can start to get brittle.

One solution I use for steel disk brakes (weather vented on cross-drilled) is to cover the faces tith aluminium duct tape and fine sand it to give the impression it's been used. Think about it.;)
I used the Tremonia kit on my Bburago F40 and the kit is superb. However, the widow frames are the one part that I didn't get on with. Accurate I know, but a little too fragile for my liking and my result when glazed was not too good so I removed the glazing. I need to revisit that so may I ask what adhesive you used to fix the glazing to the frame?

As to removing the glass from the HW frames, being plastic it's not too onerous. Opening the vents in the rear clam is a different matter. I've now done that as well and it was a little easier than on the Bb model as the metal is not as thick. I'll update my progress later. I've also ordered the last of the F40 sets 1 and 2 from Tremonia.

Thanks for the heads up on the brake discs and bleach.

Cheers,
Peter
 

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Hi Peter!

I've been attaching the window glazing to the photoetched frames using Tamiya clear varnish, since after if dries out is pretty much invisible and, even if it's noticeable, it's easily cleaned with a swab soaked in ethyl alcohol.

I guess I'll ask for a Dremell for my birthday, gotta start going "next level" on these interventions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Only bloody varnish! Now why didn't I think of that???? I used the Hypo cement I mentioned somewhere, but it's very difficult not to get too much on the frame and then it oozes out. Many thanks, I'll give that a try.


Yeah, a rotary tool is invaluable when it comes to shifting metal. Dremel are very good but mine's a Proxxon.

I don't know if brass or nickel silver is utilised much by car modellers (Wet Cellery I know has built lots of chassis frames for F40s using brass), but I come to model cars after thirty years building etched metal locomotive kits, so its natural for me to consider it where appropriate. It's not essential but if you have a soldering iron it adds another dimension to what you can do. This nickel silver loco was built almost entirely using solder construction, although some of the cast white metal and cast brass parts have been fixed with epoxy.
Train Wheel Vehicle Rolling stock Rolling


Cheers,
Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was going to update my progress on the F40, but went off on a tangent and now its "beer o'clock".

However, just to emphasise the value of solder construction and the use of brass, copper and nickel silver, here's an image downloaded from the Interweb of an F40 radiator and cooling fans that I'm trying to replicate.
Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Rolling Wood


It's far from finished, but here's where it's at for now, with the fan housings placed on the radiator. I'm not saying it couldn't be done using plastic and glue or fixing the metal parts with CA, but I couldn't do it.
Rectangle Line Jewellery Body jewelry Wood


A nice can of IPA is calling to me now, so I'll come back to this later.
Cheers (and this time I mean cheers)
Peter
 

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I was going to update my progress on the F40, but went off on a tangent and now its "beer o'clock".

However, just to emphasise the value of solder construction and the use of brass, copper and nickel silver, here's an image downloaded from the Interweb of an F40 radiator and cooling fans that I'm trying to replicate. View attachment 262042

It's far from finished, but here's where it's at for now, with the fan housings placed on the radiator. I'm not saying it couldn't be done using plastic and glue or fixing the metal parts with CA, but I couldn't do it.
View attachment 262041

A nice can of IPA is calling to me now, so I'll come back to this later.
Cheers (and this time I mean cheers)
Peter
ok i gotta ask...............









what kind of IPA?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks Spiky.

Here's an update on the progress made so far. Dechromed brake discs, column stalks and dashboard insert.
Wheel Gear Jewellery Auto part Circle


The hole in the right hand upright for the track rod end was elongated so the wheel toed in and out in relation to the left wheel. I plugged the hole with plastic rod, trimmed, cleaned up and redrilled. There was enough lenght on the track rod stub to melt the end to fix in place.
Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Engineering Machine


Side vents on the rear clam opened up and the gap in between the clam and wing rubbed down and filled. Application of primer shows further work is needed, but I've now committed to a full repaint.
Guitar accessory Gadget Automotive design Font Electronic instrument


The rear of the cockpit has been reworked but further attention will be given to the side vents to make them whole. The top plate to the suspension mounts have been thinned down to remove the oversize nut detail which has been replaced with Tremonia PE detail. A further PE part which is being left unpainted, will be added to the Tremonia parts already fitted, after painting.
Tartan Automotive lighting Vehicle Motor vehicle Hood


Here's the cross strut felled up from copper wire with the fixing bracket from waste PE fret. Fixing is by small brass rivets and CA.
Road surface Asphalt Wood Tints and shades Grass


This is the rear of the cockpit insert with parts of the rear suspension and air filter covers.
Hood Motor vehicle Bumper Automotive lighting Automotive exterior


The filter covers have been separated from the suspension and the central strut discarded.
Purple Bumper Trunk Pink Motor vehicle


The dashboard has been reworked to accomodate the PE detail from Tremoni for the instruments and the fuse cover on the right. Unlike the Bburago dashboard, the HW is smooth with no representation of the textured covering. I've given it a coat of textured paint to simulate the covering before final painting.
Rectangle Material property Magenta Composite material Electronic component


In the main cockpit area I've filled the gaps at the front, where the H gate from the TT kit will go and added the raised section between the seats and parcel shelf. The holes from the HW seatbelts have also been filled.
Wood Flooring Fashion accessory Office equipment Machine


The parcel shelf, area behind the seats and central tunnel have all been given a base coat of the textured paint. The dashboard is just placed for the photo. I'm not going to CF or Kevlar decal this as I did with my Bburago upgrade, so the tub has been sprayed with a semi Matt black.
Toy Machine Wood Magenta Motor vehicle


Here are the part done fan housings and radiator. Steel PE mesh for the outer faces, sandwiching a frame made from plastic strip. I added an insert of brass PE mesh of different size thinking it might give an impression of the radiator vanes, but it doesn't bring much to the party. It may have been better using the course mesh outside the fine mesh???
Rectangle Gold Font Motor vehicle Circle


This is the sequence for making the fan housings. First the "spiders legs" are drawn out on a piece of wood using a protractor and ruler. The legs are then laid out in position and held with masking tape and the joints in the centre soldered.
Road surface Wood Floor Flooring Symmetry


The central detail is then added. This is a spare part from a model railway project but any suitable PE disc will do. The disc is centered on the legs, held firmly inplace with a small screwdriver, flux applied around the part, then heated with the soldering iron. The solder from the legs will melt and stick the disc.
Wood Road surface Art Floor Flooring


The frame is made from a strip of spare PE brass. I needed the OD to be about 15mm so to achieve that I wrapped some masking tape around a socket to increase its diameter. The strip is then wrapped around, held tightly and soldered. The resultant band is removed by cutting away the tape on one side with a scalpel and then carefully prising it off.
Tire Bicycle tire Wheel Automotive tire Bicycle hub


The tape can then be removed from the spider and the spider placed centrally on the band. Hold in place with a screw driver and solder two opposite legs. It can then be pick up to go around the perimeter to solder the remaining legs. You have to apply the solder quickly and not dwell with the iron, to avoid the risk of desoldering the other parts. Ideally you would use a higher temperature solder first and a lower temperature later, but if you are proficient with the soldering iron it's not necessary. The locomotive shown above was soldered only with 145 celcius solder, and none of the earlier applied parts moved or came loose during later applications.
Line Floor Flooring Circle Symmetry


The excess legs can then be snipped off with side cutters and rubbed smooth. I found it best to do this with a sanding tube held in a rubber arbor in the mini drill. Soft touches quickly removes excess solder and tidies up the end of the cut legs.

The fixing brackets were added from strip brass, held in place with tweezers, soldered, cleaned up and trimmed.
Table Wood Textile Cutting mat Circuit component


Which gets you to here.
Wheel Automotive tire Road surface Asphalt Rim


Bend the bracket at right angles at the bottom edge of the band and trim to lenght.
Arthropod Circle Arachnid Space Spider web


After trimming, I popped a rivet from the underside by holding the bracket face down on the edge of the cutting mat and pressing with the end point of my scriber. I'm not happy with the smaller PE discs added to the center of the larger ones, but they are only CA glued and can be prised off with a scalpel, and replaced with something better after I've searched my stash of spare PE parts.
Rectangle Line Jewellery Body jewelry Wood


After competing the housings, I'll make the fans.

Cheers,
Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Whoops!
I overlooked to add this image which is a close up of the texture paint.
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Heres the completed fan housings with the replacement centre discs. Actually the same ones bet reversed.
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Making the fans is a similar procedure to the housings. First a 5 legged "spider" is drawn on some wood. For the blades I used a spare etching from a locomotive upgrade set, namely a boiler band cut into 10 length of 10mm. To join the blades I used another spare PE part from the loco fret.
Gold Wood Amber Road surface Adhesive


After soldering the disc, I centre popped it to allow use of a small spring bow compass to scribe the blade lengths.
Ruler Office ruler Tool Wood Measuring instrument


Here you can see the centre pop and the scribed lines on the fan blades. It's best to clean up any excess solder while the fan is still taped to the wood. Cleaning is done with a scraper blade and a steel disc wire brush in the mini drill.
Wood Cross Natural material Font Art


And after removal of the tape. Some sort of heat resistant mat would be better than wood, but if the wood burns from the heat then you are dwelling to long with the iron in contact with the work piece.
Wood Road surface Floor Line Flooring


The blades are then trimmed with a pair of embroidery scissors and angled.
Circle Symmetry Fashion accessory Metal Cross


Before fitting the fan I added another small disc to space it away from the back of the housing a little. That was done with CA, as was fixing the fan to the housing.
Gold Amber Yellow Jewellery Circle


Looks good I think. Sorry for the crap image.
Amber Gold Jewellery Rim Circle


And after priming and painting. Not perfect I know, but a big improvement on HW's efforts.
Guitar accessory Alloy wheel Automotive tire Rim Material property


A simpler option would be to cut and splice the HW radiator, if you can live with the dodgy fans. Still poor, but at least they could be fitted to the front of the chassis, with some mods to the storage area.
Motor vehicle Wood Hood Eyewear Vehicle door


I need to add a little extension to the right side to allow mounting of the hoses, but I'm getting there.
Wood Material property Road surface Font Jewellery


Here's where I've got to with the storage area mods. Still lots to do and of course the spare wheel will not fit a anymore, but most images suggest that F40 owners did not carry a spare and used it for luggage storage. Also I want to add the battery cover and for it to be visible.
Bag Luggage and bags Red Wood Fashion accessory


I've done some further work at the back of the cockpit to fill the gap under the side vents to make them whole, but I need some suitable tube to add the extension to the ducts.
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Cheers,
Peter
 

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Stunning work on those fans, I really enjoyed seeing that process. Thanks for sharing it with us! 👏
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited by Moderator)
Heres the completed fan housings with the replacement centre discs. Actually the same ones bet reversed.
View attachment 262105

Making the fans is a similar procedure to the housings. First a 5 legged "spider" is drawn on some wood. For the blades I used a spare etching from a locomotive upgrade set, namely a boiler band cut into 10 length of 10mm. To join the blades I used another spare PE part from the loco fret.

View attachment 262100

After soldering the disc, I centre popped it to allow use of a small spring bow compass to scribe the blade lengths.

View attachment 262102

Here you can see the centre pop and the scribed lines on the fan blades. It's best to clean up any excess solder while the fan is still taped to the wood. Cleaning is done with a scraper blade and a steel disc wire brush in the mini drill.

View attachment 262094

And after removal of the tape. Some sort of heat resistant mat would be better than wood, but if the wood burns from the heat then you are dwelling to long with the iron in contact with the work piece.

View attachment 262104

The blades are then trimmed with a pair of embroidery scissors and angled.

View attachment 262097

Before fitting the fan I added another small disc to space it away from the back of the housing a little. That was done with CA, as was fixing the fan to the housing.

View attachment 262096

Looks good I think. Sorry for the crap image.

View attachment 262095

And after priming and painting. Not perfect I know, but a big improvement on HW's efforts.

View attachment 262103

A simpler option would be to cut and splice the HW radiator, if you can live with the dodgy fans. Still poor, but at least they could be fitted to the front of the chassis, with some mods to the storage area.

View attachment 262106

I need to add a little extension to the right side to allow mounting of the hoses, but I'm getting there.

View attachment 262093

Here's where I've got to with the storage area mods. Still lots to do and of course the spare wheel will not fit a anymore, but most images suggest that F40 owners did not carry a spare and used it for luggage storage. Also I want to add the battery cover and for it to be visible.

View attachment 262101

I've done some further work at the back of the cockpit to fill the gap under the side vents to make them whole, but I need some suitable tube to add the extension to the ducts.

View attachment 262098


View attachment 262099

Cheers,
Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Stunning work on those fans, I really enjoyed seeing that process. Thanks for sharing it with us! 👏
Many thanks Spiky. I've shown the sequence to make the fan blades in the last post. I don't know what I did wrong but the images didn't show, only the attachment details. I contacted the admin and they've made the images visible, but the attachment details are still there! Technology, who needs it?😂

Here's the almost completed unit. I still need to add the power cable to the "fan motors", but that can wait for now.
Wood Gas Pattern Rim Circle


Creative arts Rectangle Pattern Art Craft


Hand Creative arts Natural material Pattern Craft


Excuse the weird colour on the hoses, which I'll correct. I was trying to match these on the real thing but had a colour blind moment.



Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Rim Vehicle


I've just received my HW Ferrari 288 GTO from fleabay for a later project. Been collecting refference images from the interweb and I notice it has a somewhat more complex radiator fan unit.

Cheers,
Peter
 
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