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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I read in another forum about a question one of its members had about acquiring the rights (or a licence) to produce die cast replica models, but no one had a good answer or description of the process.

I found this question to be very interesting for serious collectors like myself as I never really considered this.

Anyone know of the process the companies go through to do this? I read that the process is different for current brands like a Chevy and brands that no longer are in existence like Packard.

I assume there's some heavy duty costs $$$ to get one!

Is there a website that refers to this? I did a quick search online, but found nothing.

Steve
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Steve,

Always good to see topics like this going as it is always helpful.

I met a gentleman in the airport about 3 years ago I want to say, we just casually started talking about diecast models from out of no where.

Well he worked for GM in their licensing department or division, whichever they go by. He gave me a brief run down on the process. Companies(not just diecast, but all sorts of companies) apply for a license to market their brand or likeness. He said some of them pay for the license upfront and some commit to a percentage of the sales from the marketed product.

Keep in mind our conversation was in broad terms and not just diecast related.

So I presume applying for a license with any company to replicate their product, you would have to go throught their licensing department or division.

Reading through the AUTOart article in C&D, Mr. Yee, AUTOart President made a mention of Hot Wheels spending $5M/yrly for the rights to Ferrari's licensing. However, I am almost certain that price was generated on its exclusivity.

BTW, when I was talking to that gentleman in the airport, he showed me a model I had never seen before at the time. It was a Cadillac Escalade with big chrome wheels, outrageous stereo system and an engine bay full of chrome. It didn't have a brand on it at the time that I could recall, but it certainly seems to have a brand on it now :wink :lol

Great question, I would certainly hope someone with better first hand knowledge chime in and shed more light on this topic.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
BTW, did you find anything out on your previous model research that you were doing. I would love to hear what you have discovered about the diecast market since you started researching different aspects of it.
 

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I guess some companies would be approaching diecast makers to make models for them as showroom exclusives. I am assuming this on the basis of the models having particular part numbers like in the case of BMW. Also since Mercedes has asked AUTOart and Kyosho manufacture models to a particular price point, they must have approached the modelmakers themselves.
 

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If it is anything like the rest of the Automotive business, I am sure some dinners, ball game tickets, golf outings, bar trips :wink and some under the table money is involved.
Anything to grease the skids! You would be surprised how imaginative these rep with an expense account get.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Diecast X,

The info I got earlier for my nephew was somewhat helpful as a few companies opened a dialogue with him, but most we not too friendly in disclosing info to him.

Regarding the discussion we're having now, I did some research and some of the car companies use third party agencies to handle licensing requests. I found a company called The Bean Stalk Group, anyone heard of them?
 

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They do the work for all of the Ford group also for Harley Davison and other companies.
They were responsible for getting the 1/18 F-150, the GT and the Mustang concepts done.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Steve,

Beanstalk Group does a lot of promotions for many companies.

I do believe the relationship with Ford is the only diecast related products they offered. Did you find out which company they contracted to build those models? We talked about this some last year, I contended it was Hot Wheels, I am more convinced it was Hot Wheels now that they have acquired all of the Beanstalk molds.
 

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From Munchen @ Diecast central.

Whether a new production car , a classic vehicle from the Mobile tradition or even BMW motorcycles or classic or modern BMW motorsport racers.
Every model begins on paper - Where people sit in board rooms and discuss miniatures - product planners , marketing - All begin as ideas to which will newly be added to accompany the broad collection of BMW miniatures.

In the case of BMW . Our marketing area and lifestyle product planning always plan their marketing when a new BMW car is being developed.
Of course new vehicles like the BMW 3er Touring and of course significant " enthusiast " vehicles such as M6.

Licences are applied only to certain individual companies in the case of new production vehicles - make no mistake BMW are content with their deal with Kyosho. Of course these licences are exclusive giving BMW official contract on first production before commercial production and sales. Licences are not cheap certain models which are being developed run to hundreds of thousands of euros. For this they get access to the development , prototypes and computer aided design breakdown of the particular vehicle.

Miniatures are developed alongside their actual 1/1 counterparts as soon as a prototype hits the streets the miniture begins development.
Of course the miniature engineers are invited to see a new BMW when it is still in prototype stage. Which means they have to sign in blood a contract of information and data protection which no one seems to have broken.

In the case of example the BMW 6er coupe and cabrio both miniatures where developed at the same time as both the cars where released within a very short period of each other .
Of course probably a more significant stage involves the shipping of the actual cars pre-production cars by airfreight to the manufacturers HQ.
This includes Herpa and Minichamps in Germany and for long distance kyosho in Japan.

These cars however are non-drivable. And so are sent back and crushed.

All approval however lies with BMW , stages of model are then sent back to BMW for approval - Cost is not an issue all BMW miniatures especially in 1/18 must be of the same quality. This is demanded and if certain issues appear BMW can reject the whole project.

When the final prototype arrives at Munich , The miniature is placed in a ground floor studio alongside it's 1/1 counterpart. So that the product planners of lifestyle and of course the BMW designers - They design the actual car so they get final say on the miniature if it works out to their own actual designs. Once approval is met the miniature is then sent for production. Then the next miniature begins and then the next , so on.
 

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Thanks for the interesting story UITY. No wonder BMW models are so up to date.
 
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