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I must admit, it was a really nice race. I never imagined myself sitting and watching an entire NASCAR Race, but it was entertaining. :cheers

I think he may have gotten a little anxious from being out front all day showed a little frustration at the end. That has to be a little disappointing to run like that all day and finish up in the pack.
 
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Congrats on the Tony Stewart car, Eric! Looks nice. How's the detail on the 1:18 Action cars...the 1:24s are pretty decent, I really like my DW Pennzoil car.

The race yesterday was entertaining...I only got to see the last 50 or so laps. The green/white/checker finish was good (better than ending under caution) but on the restrictor plate tracks the cars are barely getting to full speed by the time the checker falls! Oh well...I just wish someone else would've won the race. Ugh.
 

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Congrats Eric! Now you need one of these to pose next to it! (I added the 5 o'clock shadow :giggle )
Also, do you know if the flaps work? I bought several of the WM 1/18 Motorworks kits and they are just as detailed as the Actions and I have been wondering if they are the same molds. The flaps do not work on these. They had them marked down to $10 from $39.
 
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A great buy for that price Eric.

I bet your well chuffed. :happy

I agree that the roof flap looks up in the photo. Are these to stop the car rolling in racing (on the 1:1 car) anyway? :giggle

:cheers

Timbo.
 

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You are correct. The two mandatory "roof" flaps (which function on the Action die cast), as well as two mandatory cowl flaps, plus the fences and side skirts on the cars are designed to keep them from becoming airborne in a slide or spin. The roof flaps were originally designed by Roush Racing, at the request of Nascar, when there seemed to be an increasing number of New Generation Nascar stockers going airborne, especially following accidents on the higher speed oval. You will notice that the roof flaps are at a 45 degree angle for one of them, and perpendicular to the normal direction of the car for the other.

The primary culprit is the aerodynamics of the car that create downforce in a straight line, but which create lift under certain other situations, such as a spin. You will see the roof flaps deploy as the car begins to spin, and the additional drag slows the progress of the car and replants it. In addition, the cowl flaps will open, venting air that gets caught underneath the hood. The side skirts try to keep air from getting underneath the chassis, and the fences on the roof and rear window serve to channel air flow over the rear of the car.

Highly developed aerodynamics, all designed for driver safety. Not necessarily a laughing matter.

:wink
 

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Thanks for the info, I had no idea! :cheers Question: Do they deploy automatically, or are they driver controlled? Some of the flips that I have seen, happen so quick, I just don't see how a driver can re-act that quick.
If they are driver-control are there rules governing their deployment? I can see a couple of drivers using when they are not needed.
:feedback
 

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All the "flaps" (both roof and cowl) are air-pressure operated. On the cowl flap, they vent when air pressure under the hood builds up. You can actually see them function, occassionally, during in-car shots, especially during drafting. The roof flaps also respond to air pressure, both from above, as the aero characteristics of the car change during a spin, as well as directionally. The air flow over the roof trys to lift them up, but seeing as under normal conditions, that is in the direction of movement (and the hinges are pointed in the normal direction of travel), they do not lift (I also think the weight of the roof flap holds it down under normal operations), however, once the direction of movement deviates (a spin), the air flow over the roof trys to suck them up, and if successful, they are deployed. They are not perfect, as has been evidenced in several incidents recently (last season as well as this one), but they are a damn sight better than nothing at all. There are some chilling video clips of current generation (Modern Era) Nascar stock cars becoming airborne, prior to the requirement of roof flaps.

:cool
 
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