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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been collecting some limited editions these past few years.

However, my question is a "limited edition" a REAL "limited edition"?

For example, if I buy a numbered 1964 Ford Mustang that is limited to say 2,000 numbered editions from "ABC BRAND" (so I don't discredit anyone), and then a few months later "ABC BRAND" releases 60,000 general versions of the car that are not numbered and don't have the COA.

Does my numbered version's value come down, or is it "still" considered a limited edition.

I've seen companies like Maisto release mass versions of some race cars and Exoto offer limited editions of the same car and in the same scale and therefore the Exoto one may be more sought after as we're comparing apples to oranges, but what if its from the same brand?

Thanks!
 

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I would say the price would go down. Just look at Ertl's so called limited editions that a couple of years later are reissued.
 

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Hi there!, I mainly collect Biante and Classic Carlectables and every one of them i buy are limited editions, eg all with limited runs with COA. I think personally they are worth more than any others that dont have the certificate.

And to if two lots were made by the same company one with and one without certificates, id say the certificated limited edition models would be more sought after by collectors being a limited production run..

Value in general is run by what someones willing to pay..

in my opinion limited editions over the non limited , will always be more sought after..

And i think the market will decide wether or not the prices go up or down depending on the model and how sought after it really is.. :cheers
 

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And my question is: for example, the 40th Anniversary Murcielago, how can i know that is a real limited edition of 2000 pieces if the car don´t have any number (piece 1573 of 2000 pieces, for example)???????, or the M3 E46 GTR?????
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have been holding off on posting to this thread as I have been researching some Ertl models asI quickly sliding down a slippery slope with some of their models.

I'll use them as an a example.

Some of their models I am looking at are limited to 2500 pieces. Then you can find the same exact model limited to 2500 pieces with the exception being the color.

Technically, they are limited editions as their prices clearly reflect that as they have not dropped in prices at all, if anything they have increased :WTF

Some colors command more than others.

I think I can understand the philosophy behind it as it isn't a bad one. The only problem is that more companies have started doing this and the entire process is then painted with a wide paint brush with the "Limited" status being questioned.

If a particular model is a limited production model and does really well where the supply falls short of the demand; it only makes sense for the company to reissue the same model as another limited edition in a different color. The problem arises once they go to the well once to many times.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
But has there been a case where the limited edition car is the "exact" same as the ones for general release.

Lets take this one "for example",
2500 red 1986 BMW M6 are released with COA, display case etc from ABC BRAND
60000 red 1986 BMW M6 are released with only a gift box from ABC BRAND

Are there cases like this? If so, does the limited edition item maintain its value?
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Steve,

I'm not aware of the same exact model being released from the example you pointed out. However, anything is possible in the diecast industry.

I would figure it to be senseless(but not out of the realm) to pass a previous "Limited Edition" as a regular production version. If we are speaking of the exact same model and the only difference being an original COA, in my mind that would render the entire "Limited Production" version useless. I would guess to say that I'm not alone in this either.

But there is always a flipside to this when your talking about the diecast industry :lol

I have a dealer edition 2004 Porsche 996 Cabrio Turbo. The only difference between this model and the regular production model is the color, its red and the production version colors are silver and yellow. Does this make it anymore valuable...depends on who you ask as every collector will have their perception of things like this.

I believe it all comes down to the individual collector and what they percieve to be valuable in their own aspect. It differs from collector to collector.
 

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Ertl has re-released the same models that were numbered L/Es only later to become a general release :ranting
 

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Consider this scenario:

Minichamps released the Ford RS200 in three versions:

Diamond White, Red, and a Rally Version.

All were limited to between 2000 and 3500 pcs.

A few years later they released a black right hand drive version, again limited to 2500 pcs.

Now as for the prices of these cars, the Diamond White (which had a run of 3000 or so) is fetching up to $100+ USD. The rally car is fetchin upwards of $300 USD and the red and black cars haven't moved much at all.

So what you have to consider is this. A model is only worth as much as someone is willing to pay. The red and balck RS200 are rarer than the white one, but not fetching as much money.

There are approx 10,000 - 12,000 cars released by minichamps, but because the colours vary they are considered different and not the same. This is the same situation if your car has a COA. If the car of what it came with differ to the re-release of a model, you have a different model.

Minichamps released a blue McLaren F1 in 1:43 this year, and that isn't nearly as sought after as the original releases of the F1. It's a new model and people want the original releases.

If your model is different in anyway - colour, packaging, COA, or even model no - then you have a different model in the eyes of most collectors.

Hotwheels do limited edition runs of 25,000 for their Ferrari F1 cars, and each comes with a COA I think (I haven't opened the boxes of mine), but such a high production run means they'll never increase in value. Re-releases are different to high production runs though.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow...25K Limited Editions

I would love to know what they consider a regular production number.
 
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