DiecastXchange Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Here's my latest review. On a side note, my photos are better this time! Enjoy!

Kyosho Lamborghini Jota Review

Paint: 8
The paint is a deep, beautifully clear coated red. The paint is without flaw, extremely smooth, deep, rich, dare I say luscious? The painted silver trim around the windshield and door windows is perfect, no over spray. The undersides of the front hood, rear hood, and rear trunk are painted flat black.

Exterior: 7 out of 8
This model has 6 opening parts: Front hood, gas cap, passenger doors, rear hood, and rear trunk. I will split this model into 3 parts and cover the 1st third and last 3rd in the Exterior section, and the middle 3rd in the Interior section. First, an overall impression of the exterior. It is beautiful! This was the second Diecast model I purchased, and it remains one of my top 3 favorites. All vent openings on this car are actual openings, and they are covered by wire mesh that is painted flat black. There are 3 openings in the front bumper area, 2 on the hood, 2 on the front side fenders (1 on each side), 2 below each door (1 on each side), 2 on the rear fenders (1 on each side), and 2 on the rear bumper. There is also a large opening in the back bumper that is not covered by mesh (as it should not be). On the roof of the passenger compartment, there are two vents that are engraved into the roof. I do not see how it would be possible for them to look authentic if they were actual openings, because the lines are so small. However, they are painted black. But not just black. The slits of the vents are red, and the engraved areas are flat black, so they look open.

This car has 2 headlights which are opaque in color and look wonderful. The reside in silver painted "tunnels" within the hood, and are covered by flush glass (plastic). They are where the Miura's vents and pop up headlights would have resided if this model was a Miura. There are 2 fog lights in the bumper, they are nicely textured and no posts are visible. Also seen in the bumper area are two clear amber colored turn signals. These turn signals are within chrome rings and look awesome. On the front side fenders, there are the tiniest side marker lamps I've seen, and they are clear amber plastic, not painted on, and no mounting posts. The look awesome. The rear lights are out back, and they are rectangular in shape, composed of red, orange, and clear plastic, surrounded by chrome trim. They are nicely textured, and each lamp within this rectangle is separated by a vertical piece of chrome trim also.

The front of the car:
The hood has a beautiful triangular photo etch Lamborghini emblem on the front center of the hood. It is recessed into the mold, yet has a higher stance, meaning, it still is higher than the hood. It has an awesome, authentic feel to it when you rub your finger over it. The sides of this logo are smooth and rounded, not rough. It's like the mold was designed for this emblem, and not just stuck on the hood if that makes sense. The hood has two vents on top, which have molded in rivet detail, and are flat black in color. They have black mesh coverings, which are see through. The gas cap lid comes through the hood, and it is silver in color. You are able to flip it open whether the hood is up or down. The hole for the gas cap is surrounded by molded in rivets. There also is a "character line" indention that goes from almost the Lambo logo all the way to the rear edge of the front hood. On each side of the front hood, behind the wheels, are more vents, which are flat black in color, surrounded by molded in rivets, and actually protrude into the fenders; however, they do not go thru the fender, and there is no mesh covering here. It's somewhat of a shame, but looking at this, maybe it would have been really hard to pull off any better than it is, considering the angles. Lets open the hood…

Opening the hood brings a plethora of goodies. First, you notice a nice chrome hood strut that holds the hood open. As mentioned before, the inside of the hood is painted flat black. Another item of interest is that there is actually a clear plastic piece that represents a hood light! It has a silver base, and is a really nice touch. Opening the hood causes this light to actually light up! Just kidding, but it's that authentic. Inside the hood area, there are lots of neat features. There is a mammoth horn, which has 5 trumpets, flat red in color. Each trumpet is a different length, going from long to short, drivers side to passenger side. They come out of a flat black box which has 5 silver colored rivets at the horns edge. This "black box" also has 5 clear, individually rendered plastic tubes coming out of it, and going into the firewall, before they go into the firewall, they go into a corrugated large rubber tube. There are also 5 additional tubes coming out of this black box; 1 is a clear amber color and goes to the gas cap area, 1 is a clear opaque tube that comes out of the top and wraps around the side of the box going to the firewall, there is another clear tube coming out of the top of the box going towards the firewall, and finally, an additional 2 red wires that are held together by a clear plastic tube. These two wires come out of a silver circle area on the top left of the black box, which is surrounded by 5 molded in rivets.

The battery resides in the front most area of this compartment, and it's primary color is white. The battery has 6 yellow colored circles (where you would pour in the acid), the posts are silver in color, there are 2 blue labels on the battery, 1 reads "Varta", the other has symbols. Also, there are 2 additional labels on the battery, they are all tampo'd on. The silver battery posts are met by 2 black wires, which go towards the firewall. Ahead of the battery, you see the radiator, which has 2 separately mounted fans, each within their respective enclosure.

The double wishbone suspension is very well represented, and the functioning coil over shocks are red and silver in color, with red coils that will recoil if you press down on the car. The suspension pieces move when compressed, as well as the chrome stabilizer bar. You are also able to see the rod that connects the front wheels together so that they can steer. This is an actual representation, and you can not see the models steering "guts".

Back behind the black box, there are several separately molded accessories. One is a bottle that is flat white with 2 black lids, a row of tiny silver boxes along the firewall, 2 silver canisters with red lids which are connected to each other with black and silver wires, another flat white "thing" on the firewall representing something, and a tampo label.

Both doors, driver and passenger have chromed door handles and a separate chromed piece representing door locks. The doors have full windows, the windows being surrounded by silver. You have to use a pick or the door handles and a finger nail to open these tight fitting doors.

The windshield has a single wiper arm with two blades. The windshield is surrounded by silver. Windshield washer nozzles are represented by raised silver painted knobs. The roof of the passenger compartment has a beautiful chrome, metal radio antenna. It is perfect in size, totally to scale, and is definitely not a thick piece of chrome plated plastic like you see on some models that try to represent an antenna.

The rear of the car:
The rear of the car is very muscular in appearance, with audacious fender flares. The slats that cover the engine area are flat black in appearance, and they are actual slats, meaning, you can see through them. There is also a wing mounted on the top most area of the rear hood, right behind the passenger compartment. It is flat black, has molded in rivets, and says "Jota" on each side of the wing in white letters. Right behind the passenger doors, on each side, is a tampo'd "Bertone" label. That represents the styling studio responsible for styling the body. It is silver and black in color, and is perfectly legible and sharp. Behind the rear wheels, on each side, are mesh covered vents, surrounded by molded in rivets.

The bumper area (there is no actual bumper) has a large opening towards the bottom and 4 chromed, hollow exhausts protrude from it. Above that, you see 2 additional, mesh covered vents, colored in flat black, and surrounded by molded in rivets. Between these 2 vents is a license plate that says "jota", and above it are two pieces of separate chrome trim representing the license plate lights. Between these two pieces is an additional separate piece of chrome trim representing the trunk lock or button used to open the small trunk. Opening the trunk revels a small luggage compartment. Inside this compartment you see the squared pipes that go to the 2 vents on the back of the car. The trunk compartment is black in color, as well as the inside of the trunk door. It is not carpeted. I am not sure if it is supposed to be or not. Since this was the high performance version of the Miura, a racer legal for the road (and only 1 made), I'm leaning towards there isn't supposed to be carpet here, but am not sure. Lets open the engine lid (what I have earlier referred to as the "rear hood"):

Again, the engine lids insides are flat black in color. You can clearly see through the slats covering the engine area on the hood. Here you see the beautiful V-12 engine. The block is flat silver. The heads are flat black and are scribed with "Lamborghini" in silver. You see engraved cooling fins in these two heads. Above these heads, you see the breathers for the cylinders, 1 for each cylinder, meaning 12 of them. They have gold bodies, and are toped with textured silver tops. I would think that the real car had actual openings in this area. These are represented well however they are not open. The engine is fully wired. The spark plug wires are red, and they are twisted together, as I've seen on many Lambo cars. The wires come from 2 distributors, black and silver in color. Surrounding the engine are the rear "braces" that make up the chassis. These are comprised of black, silver, and chrome colors. You are also able to see the transmission, silver in color behind the engine, with the axles going to the wheels. The exhaust headers come from the engine, are flat black in color, and go to chrome exhausts, which again, are hollow. The rear suspension is well represented, being independent, with black and red coil over shock absorbers. They are functional, and the suspension pieces move when compressed, as well as the stabilizer bars connected to the rear suspension. This chrome bar is actually on top of the rear of the engine compartment, and does a 90 degree turn down to the suspension. It moves up when the suspension is compressed.

Why 7 out of 8? Simply because the side vents in the front fenders are not mesh covered. They are textured here, and I really think it would be hard considering the type of area it is. I have point out both good and bad, even on a good model.

Interior: 8
The interior is beautiful. It is black, with silver, chrome, and red accents. It has black carpeting all around. From what I can see, there are 8 gauges represented. Two of these are in a double binnacle behind the steering wheel. The remaining 6 are in the center console. All gauges are legible. I count 14 switches in the interior, all being painted separately. There is one on the dashboard that is silver and red, I believe a starter switch. The power window switches have tampo's on them representing which way to push the switches. The steering wheel is black with a silver, black, and yellow tampo'd Lambo logo in the center. The gear shifter is chrome and black, with the top black handle portion being topped with a yellow tampo with the shift pattern. This gear shifter resides in a silver painted gate, with the gates being painted black. There is also a chrome reverse lockout switch. The emergency brake handle is chrome, and appears to be a piece of metal, not plastic. On the passenger side of the dashboard, there are 3 round vents on the top of the dashboard, and they are ringed in actual chrome.

The center console between the seats is black with silver trim., and the rear wall between the seats has two round areas outlined in silver. I am unsure as to whether these are supposed to be vents or speakers or what, but they look good.

The interior of the doors are black with silver painted trim. They are textured, and the bottom third of the insides of the doors are a cream/yellow color, which by the way, is the same color that the interior roof if finished in. The interior roof, by the way is very well finished. It has a center console on the roof with black switches, and the sun visors are painted black. There is a black rear view mirror which looks back into the rear window. Through the rear window you can see the engine and not much else, except the engine cover slats.

The racing seats are soft and supple, with a nice smooth texture. The 5 point racing seat belts are red fabric, and they are connected to a photo etch fastener. The seatbelts also have a yellow color with "Sabelt" written on them, the seat belt manufacturer I believe.

Wheels/Brakes: 5 out of 6
The wheels are very nice, but I'm not giving a perfect score. They are silver and gold in color, the gold being mesh. They have chrome center knock offs. They also have separate, chrome valve stems. But the nice tires are un-marked, although the tread pattern is really nice. Also, you can see the brake disks and calipers through the mesh wheels, but the disks do not turn with the wheels. The rear tires are taller and much wider than the front tires.

Why a 5 out of a 6? The tires aren't marked (which I personally do not have a problem with), and the brake disks do not spin with the calipers. I have to be objective for those reading this review.

Engine & Undercarriage Detail 7 out of 8
Here you see the beautiful V-12 engine. The block is flat silver. The heads are flat black and are scribed with "Lamborghini" in silver. You see engraved cooling fins in these two heads. Above these heads, you see the breathers for the cylinders, 1 for each cylinder, meaning 12 of them. They have gold bodies, and are toped with textured silver tops. I would think that the real car had actual openings in this area. I believe they should be open mesh, they would be on a CMC or Exoto. These are represented well however they are not open. The engine is fully wired. The spark plug wires are red, and they are twisted together, as I've seen on many Lambo cars. The wires come from 2 distributors, black and silver in color. Surrounding the engine are the rear "braces" that make up the chassis. These are comprised of black, silver, and chrome colors. You are also able to see the transmission, silver in color behind the engine, with the axles going to the wheels. The exhaust headers come from the engine, are flat black in color, and go to chrome exhausts, which again, are hollow.

The chassis is black, mostly one piece, but becomes more detailed in the engine area, where you are able to see the bottom portion of the engine, transmission and suspension components.

Even though this is one of my favorite models, I do have to be objective. The "Engine & Undercarriage Detail" section has a 7 out of 8. Why? The cylinder breathers are textured but not open mesh. The chassis is a little plain in the middle of the car towards the front. If I was rating this just for myself, I'd give it an 8, but I have to be fair for others to get an objective view.

Competition: 6
No other model manufacturer makes the Lamborghini Jota. Anson did make the Miura, Ertl bought this mold and will be making the Miura again. AutoArt will be releasing the Miura, and I hear that Kyosho also will be making the Miura. The Jota is the super high performance version of the Miura. Lamborghini did release a Jota version of the Countach, and there is a model manufacturer that makes this, however, when people think of the Jota, it is this car they think of, and only Kyosho makes this Jota.

Desirability: 6
One of my favorites.

Overall: 47 out of 50
 
G

·
That was a great review Darren . Your work is much appreciated and I must say that its a fantastic model . I bought mine about a month ago and was blown away by the detail on this car , more so coz I won it for only £25 on ebay (brand new & boxed) .
All I can say to anyone who doesnt have it yet is.....WHY NOT ?..BUY IT NOW
 
G

·
DAMN...I just noticed I goofed.

Sorry mrmilo.....credit where credits due :jk: :jk:
I assumed Darren wrote it as he does such a great job .
I guess assumption is the mother of all f :x ups

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,963 Posts
Very good and long review.
I have the model too but without the Jota sign in the wing.
But in my opinion, the model is not Jota SVR but Miura SVR. Real Jota was produced only as "Jota" or "Miura Jota" without any "SVR".
Lamborghini-produced copies of real Jota were "Miura SVJ" where J stands for Jota. Only five of them were produced. The Kyosho model is in my opinion the Hubert Hahne "Miura SVR" which is originally Miura re-done by Lamborghini to Jota but with addtional top wing. Therefore "Miura SVR".
For more information, see folloving link:

http://www.qv500.com/lamborghinimiurap6.htm
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top