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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Jeffs post urged me to start practicing on better pictures for my models.

Looking at Jeff's lighting, our lighting is exact all the way down to the lamps.

However, I want to use a shiny mirror background, but for whatever reason the lighting shines through on it.

Is there anyway to remove the lighting from the background :feedback

I want to concentrate on the lighting before I move on to focusing and ps'ng the final picture.

Here are a few sample shots I took, let me know how toimprove the lighting and remove the shine of the background.
 

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When I had that problem, Felix told me to reduce the amout of angle of the background.

Lay it flatter so it doesn't catch as much light.
 

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Darrick, you will also have to "soften" the light that is iluminating the model, since you are having flares. If you have flares on the model, you will have a reflex on a reflexive bg.
 

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Here are a couple tips you can try out Darrick:

- curve the back 1/4 of your background so it's actually curved, & not so flat
- bring your camera lower to the table-top height;
- if you're using halogen lights, I'd advise keeping them full bright so you get as wide a spectrum as you can. Turning down the lamp will reduce the glare, but it also tends to make the bulb cast a more yellow hue;
- if you have an LCD view finder in back of your digicam, use it to see if there are any glare spots. If there are, move your light around until you minimize it;
- oh yeah, I've found silver to be a real pain. That's why I don't use it anymore :giggle

Good luck & let us know how you progress!
 

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Darrick, your lighting isn't very uniform. The front of the model is superexposed, and even with flares. You'll have to get the light more diffuse.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
To diffuse the lighting, do I double up on the sheeting over the light?

I'll be messing with this all night until I get it right :giggle
 

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Can you take a photo of your light? Seriously. :giggle

And what is the model of your digicam? I'd like to Google the specs and features. What were you saying again about me doing contracting work? :lol :lol My engineering consulting fees start at......hey, this one is pro bono. :giggle :giggle

Silver cars are a real pain. I'd suggest you pull your light further away from your car to reduce the glare. Plus, if you can actually angle the light so it's not aimed straight at any flat panels of your car, that would also help.

BTW, nice work in reducing/eliminating the glare off the rear of the background!! :nicejob :nicejob
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Camera is a Kodak CX6200, its only a 2.0 MP.

I was going to uy a camera this morning, it was on clearance, 5.0 MP Olympus for $145.

But I passed on it as I need to figure this one out first.

I'll get a picture of the lighting set up.
 

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I found a review off Steve's Digicams review website:
  • The Kodak CX6200 is an entry-level two megapixel point-n-shoot digicam. Designed for the first-time digicam buyer, the CX6200 has only an automatic mode of operation, and it is simple enough for a child to use. Its lightweight plastic body is small enough to be carried in your pocket or purse, ready to capture that special snapshot. It is also a member of Kodaks EasyShare system, supported by the same easy to use software, and optional docking stations as its more capable and more expensive big brothers, the Kodak EasyShare CX6330 and DX6440.

    The Kodak CX6200 is equipped with a fixed focal length lens of 37mm (35mm equivalent). The lens is all glass, reasonably sharp, and the moderate wide angle is a good compromise for indoor, portrait and landscape shots. The lens is fixed-focus, with a range of 20 inches to infinity. There is no macro mode, so you won't be using the 6200 for close-up shots of small items to sell at online auction. There is also no lens cover, so be sure to carry a micro fiber cleaning cloth to wipe away the inevitable smudges.
So, if you keep you camera no closer than 20 inches from the car, you should get it in focus. If you're shopping for a new digicam (like Steve ....hint hint), let us know and I'm sure we could offer you some good recommendations. A digicam with manual features would be a decent idea. :wink
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well that explains a lot. :lol

And that description sounds exactly like my camera too :giggle

Before I invest in a new camera, I will need to play with this one some more.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Alright, I'll move the lighting back too.

Thanks for the tips on this as I have been struggling.

Sometime my pics look alright, other times they look like crap.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Your second set of pics may be surexposed but it is way better than the first pics of this thread !!

All the tips I know have already been said so I just have to wish you good luck on your photography ! :cheers
 

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By the way, from looking at your original pictures, I gather you're using two light sources. Am I right? One bulb looks bluish and the other yellow. Do you have one halogen light and one regular incandescent (old school) light bulb?
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Gents,

Thanks for all the help, I willc ontinue to practice.

Thomas, what is the meaning of: surexposed :confuse

Felix, I am using two light soruces sometimes three. The first is a regular light source with a sheet to filter the light. The second light is a photographers light.

I think the lights are too close, I have both of them less than a foot away. I will try moving them back further.
 
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