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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just disassembled a model for the first time, after a guest in my apartment dripped candle wax on my 1:18 HotWheels Ferrari 333 SP. I carefully removed the screws and took the thing apart into four or five pieces so I could clean off the wax. (Freezing the compontents allowed me to whipe the wax off like dust.) What occured to me is, this ain't so hard. Mind you, that model doesn't have many opening parts, but still...

I don't really know what to ask here, but can anyone give me a point in the right direction? I would be interested in detailing some of my models, maybe with transkits or something, but I have no idea where to start.

Any tips would be most appreciated.
 

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As a relative novice myself, I would say that you have started and that is a critical step. Some people are too afraid to begin, and so, they never do anything. At least you saw a need to dismantle the model and fix it. And you took the initiative and did it. Good for you!

My tips would be:
Always be patient, careful and relaxed in whatever task you attempt.
Think though a step before you actually begin to do the step.
Pay close attention to details. Study what you are doing before you actually do it.
Have a general plan for what you want to do. Be willing to alter the plan when you encounter something that isn't right or that doesn't quite fit the plan. For example, say you plan to paint something gloss red, but when the paints dries completely you don't like the result. So alter this result by painting it again a flat red to get the result you want.

Don't be afraid to do the different things that you know will work initially.

As you gain more experience you can move into areas that you are less certain of the results. Here it gets to be riskier but the rewards of a satisfying modification is greater. More risk equals more satisfaction usually.
There are plenty of great posts on this forum offering tutorials on all sorts of modifications and detailing jobs. Use the experiences of others to build on. There is nothing like getting the inside scoop from the experts.

And lastly, be willing to accept mistakes that you make and learn from them. There is nothing in life that is perfect. Even the masterpieces that we see , the originators of these masterpieces know where they made a "mistake" or two. We might not ever be able to see them but the artist knows. So always strive to do the best you possibly can and you will continue to advance positively and make models that you are proud of.

Don't get discouraged. Keep on modeling and enjoy yourself!
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Adding to what Bob has already pointed out, find yourselves a few donor models to practice on.

Don't be discouraged or intimidated as mistakes will happen.
 

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I'll add to the "be patient" idea. Be prepared to have several (multiple) failures before you hit on one that you really feel worthy of bragging about. Some of us (I hope there are others out there like me) have boxes of spare parts that used to be complete models. Start out simple, like just a repaint. Make sure you look at the parts and pieces very closely. They are frequently hidden plastic parts that might not be obvious, as they are painted identical to the diecast metal. If you are stripping paint with a commercial grade stripping compound, the plastic will go crazy, and you will find yourself with a pile of clean diecast parts, with no trim pieces to finish it with.

I also like the advise to look to the next step after the one you are on. If you are going to be aggressive and try to cut or trim, or maybe add a part from one model to another one, be very measured in what you cut or trim, because it is a lot easier to cut more, but you can never cut less (that is once you cut the first time).

Good Luck, and let's see some of those customs!

:cheers
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the tips, guys. Much appreciated.

Hopefully after some tinkering I'll have something to sharing with the forum.
 

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I'd add one more tip. If you are going to be adding modified and/or scratch built parts, check the fit of the part in it's intended place with all other parts in place as well as a test fit. This is especially important if you think it might interfere with the body in some way, such as not allowing the trunk or hood to close properly. Nothing is more frustrating than finishing your mod and you think it really looks good only to find that the hood won't close all the way because there is a part or hose interfering with it. This happens to me all to time because I don't often follow this tip. . . :giggle
 

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nojo, whatever detailing you want to do, will always depend on the model you will work on and what kind of details you want to give it. If you choose a model subject maybe we could be more specific about what you can do and how to do it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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I'd be interested in maybe adding new components, like wings, custom front ends, new wheels, wheel arches and the like. Do these parts need to be made from scratch, or are there places to buy the components ready-made to be applied? i've seen some parts on ScuderiaModelli.com, but are there other places?

I've got a few transkits en route as well from Tremonia.org. I'm looking forward to getting started.
In the meantime, I'm starting out by repainting the roll hoops on my Hot Wheels 550 Barchetta. Gotta start somewhere, i guess.
 

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If I want a different part, I sometimes look around for another budget model to use as parts. Some parts, simple ones, I scratch build. One of these days I will have enough money to check out one of those trans-kits. . .
 
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