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The most spectacular Lamborghini Miura was undeniably the Jota, it was the most ambitious project Bob Wallace ever built.
In Italian the letter 'J' is pronounced 'Jota', here it refers to appendix 'J' in the International Auto Racing rules, this car was built to go racing, as Bob Wallace puts it, it was a flat-out P400 racing machine.
Unfortunately it was never entered in a race, it was one af Bob's toys, a car he had designed and built in his spare time, during evenings and week-ends, when he could use all the Lamborghini tools he needed, Ferruccio didn't mind all this as long as it didn't interfere with Bob's normal work.
The Jota only looked like a Miura, almost everything was redesigned, most of the body was now finished in Avional, a light composite alloy used in the aircraft industry, also the floor of the basic steel chassis was made of this lightweight material. The bodystyling looked very aggressive, the pop-up headlights were replaced with fixed ones, now behind plastic covers and a large chin spoiler was installed to minimize upward lift at high speeds. Behind the front and rear wheels were large air vents installed and the standard dual windshield wipers were replaced by a single parallelogram-action racing type one.
The side windows, now made out of plastic, were fixed and had little sliding parts built into them. The interior was also heavily modified, the trim was removed and the central console had to go, now the pedals were hung from the top, while the normal Miura had them installed on the floor.
Very wide campagnolo wheels were installed on the Jota, therefore the complete suspension had to be redesigned, the spare wheel was moved to the rear of the car to improve the weight distribution, also the front mounted fuel tank was removed, and two smaller ones (60 Lt. each) were built into the door sills.
Bob Wallace also modified the engine, by boosting the compression ratio, fitting modified cams and a electronic ignition system, installing a dry-sump lubrication system and changing the exhaust system to a competition inspired 'open' one with four megaphones, the output went up to 440 bhp. The oil radiators were changed for units coming from the Islero and the gearbox was fitted with closer ratios.
The Jota covered over 20,000 hard kilometers on the Pirelli test tracks, driven by Bob Wallace, which led to the development of the H60 VR15 tire, to be used by the 'normal' Miura.
This unique Jota doesn't exist anymore, when the first problems arose at Sant'Agatha, the Jota was sold as a valuable asset, InterAuto, an industrialist up in Brescia bought the car on february 8, 1972, and his mechanic ripped the side fuel tank open against a bridge during a Saturday trip with his girlfriend. The car cought fire and was completely destroyed, not even the chassis could be rescued.

After this sad event, several Miura owners had their car modified to Jota specifications, but the one and only Jota was destroyed, and these replica's don't even come close. Some of them also had dry-sump lubrication, but most of them only had a look alike body, underneath that beautiful, low styling, they remained a 'normal' Miura.
These replica's are believed to be built on the following chassis : 4860, 4990, 3781, 5100, 5090, while the real Jota was built on chassis number 5084, with engine number 30744, only the first three of these replica's have a dry-sump lubrication. The nr. 4860 was built for Hubert Hahne in Dusseldorf, Germany, the nr. 4990 was sold to Alberto Silvera in Port au Prince, Haiti, while a third one went to France.
From www.lambocars.com



From www5b.biglobe.ne.jp/~motorcar/JOTA
 
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Thanks alot! :x ;-) I just had to clean all the drool of my key board! :shock: :mrgreen:
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