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:tongue :tongue Whoa!! :tongue :tongue
I'd like to know how he does that rust streaking, because that's exactly how they look in real life when they sit out in the open. I am jealous. I can't re-create that exact effect. . . yet. Thanks for showing us those Gary. That person has talent. He's done the rust holes on the Combi very well too. . .
 

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Those are really impressive. Looks like the bidding is going to be pretty intense - wonder what they'll end up going for?
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
you can buy stuff that will cause metal to rust on demand (i think hardware stores will have it) and you just use a syringe and a small needle... put it where you want the rust to start and it will run once you have put enough (think water on a window.. to much water and it runs)
 

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I really dont think you can make Zamac to oxidize like mild steel. Zamac when it corrodes shows localized spotting.
From the pictures, what I assume is the person lets the part he wants to show corroded sit in a caustic solution, then paint it and let some wet paint (rust colored ofcourse) run down the sides. I could be all wrong but that could be one way of doing it.
 

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Never heard of Zamac, but I suddenly had the idea of using diluted rust paint in a syringe and doing it that way. SHAZAM!!! :eek:k :nicejob
Thanks to Malik and winston for the brain jump start. . . :yahoo
 

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ZAMAC stands for Zinc Aluminium Metal Alloy Casting. The stuff our toycars our made of. Incase you are using caustic solution like sodium hydroxide, be very careful with the stuff. The chemical is highly corrosive and discolors anything that comes in contact with it. When you mix it in water (normally a 10% solution is good enough for such jobs), the reaction is exothermic (i.e. the solution gets very hot). Please use handgloves while handling the stuff and wash off anything that has come in contact with it in cold running water.
By guesstimates, for corrision of such kind as shown in those models, the part will have to sit in the caustic solution for atleast an hour's time or so.
All the best with your next venture cobalt. :cheers
 

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I don't think I'm ready to try and use Zamac yet. When I was a kid, my Mom would always say, "I don't want you kids playing with sodium hydroxide." Inert acrylic paint: Good. Caustic solutions: Bad. But you and Malik's comments sparked the idea to use diluted rust paint in a syringe. I'm going to experiment on a very distressed Karmann Ghia that is currently on the back burner. I thank you two for giving me the idea. . .
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
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sorry.. Ill explain better... the stuff I have seen comes in 2 parts.... you put the first part (which contains trace amounts of iron i believe) onto the thing you want to appear rusty... then you apply the second amount which causes the iron to rust..

I have seen it used on ceramic, terracotta as well as metals (inc. chrome) to give weathered appearances... so it wont actually rust the diecast's metal..

no i dont recall what it is called...
 
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