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Wake Work Sleep
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been painting parts for a while now but I've been having alot of trouble finishing any cars up. My problem is that the paint I use (automotive touch up paint found at advance auto and places like that) does not seem to hold up worth anything. Even after extensive curing the paint can be easily scraped off with a fingernail. It's just much much weaker than the original paintjob which you will notice usually can't be damaged without some hardcore trauma. I've damaged some of my paintjobs just by closing a door at the wrong angle.

The problem gets worse because, after I start putting windshields and things back in they tend to have little "pop-in" edge pieces which scrape along the paint. That would be fine if the paint was like the original coat but it just flakes right off. I don't know if I'm using the wrong paint or doing something wrong with the process but this paint is just plain weak.

I start with two coats of primer, sand lightly and go back over the car to make sure nothing looks bad then I lay down a light coat, let it dry, lay down a slightly thicker coat to cover the primer and let that dry overnight, sand it down and spray again. I repeat until it looks good (usually about 3-4 coats). Then I let it cure and finish of with sanding and rubbing compound. Everytime that I've used clearcoat, the paint gets stuff stuck under it and turns into a nightmare. Will the clearcoat add alot of strength to the paint, it doesn't seem to? I really would like to get a paintjob as strong as the original paintjob, what can you guys reccomend I do? What are your paintjobs like?
 
G

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Gafo,

Sounds like each coating that you use is too thick.

Try painting them with really light coats.

Here is a method I use for multi layers of paint.

Primer>
The first coat of primer shouly actually be a mist and you only want to sray in the hard to reach spots.

Once that dries, your next coat of primer will be another fine mist. This time covering up the entire model.

By doing this, your primer isn't to thick in those hard to reach spots. I learned this through trial and error. :giggle

Wet sand as neccessary.

Now on to the paint.

Just as you did the first coat of primer, use a VERY VERY light mist of paint, making sure you get those hard to reach spots.

If you do not cover the model completely with the paint, thats fine. Just allow it to dry.

On the second coat, use another very fine mist of paint and allow it to dry.

Repeat the above process if you desire three coats to get the full effect of the paint.

If not, your done with the painting portion.

I have used some paints that do not require them to be wet sanded. If your paint doesn't require wet sanding, you can shoot it with a clear coat.

A secret that I learned is that if you have a little orange peel, a clear coat will fill it in and it won't be noticeable.

Everyones technique is differnet when it comes to painting, so use a donor mode to experiment on as that is what I do.

I use a heat gun to speed the curing process as well as smooth out paint that is applied to thick in certain areas, mainly the hard to reach spots.

Hope that helps.
 
G

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I agree on the applying too think of a paint job. I idea is to get the most consistency with the thinnest layer of paint each time. Your doing fine it sounds like so far as your paint preparation and your on the right track. Ive tried it all ways and the easiest way Ive found is to use 3 mist coats and 2 wet coats. Now if you do this and still have problems it could be how you prep the model for paint. The primer still needs to be clean and free of any fingerprint, it doesnt matter if your hands are clean this could still do harm to your paint. Also the primer should be a little rough so that the paint can stick to it better. Also it depends on what type of primer you use versus the actual paint. Certain paints do not mix with each other for example acrylic or enamel may not work with laquer bc laquers are know to be hotter. I hope this helps. Good luck :cheers
 
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