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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planning on repainting my Mercedes-Benz C36 AMG by 1:18 UT Models from Silver Metallic to Bordeaux Red Metallic (I'm starting Project: C36 again, for those who remember), so how do I go about painting a model from the start?-- How do I remove the current paint? What should I do to prepare to paint (the Bordeaux Red Metallic is in a spray can)? What do I do with the plastic parts (ie: bumpers)? etc....

Any help will be much appreciated!
 
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boedan,

Here are some brief step by steps.

I presume this model is diecast and doesn't have plastic body panels.

>disassemble the model completely until you have the parts you are wanting to paint completely.

>Use a can of paint remover. This can be found at an auto parts store. Spray the model all over and the paint will peel away easily.

>Once down to the bare metal, fill any high low spots with putty.

>Now you are ready to shoot the primer. Primer comes in two shades, dark for dark colored paint jobs and light for the lighter colors of paint.

>You can wet sand the primer to smooth it down. Depending on the coats as well as the primer, you may have to wait a day or so before applying paint.

>Once the primer is dired, you can shoot the paint.

>Once the paint is on, you will then need to wet sand it as well.

>Now your ready for the clear coat.

As previously mentioned, this is just a brief tutorial. all painitng techniques vary from colors to coats. However, the basics remain the same.
 
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Heres a few of my paint jobs that I have done. Each time my technique has improved.





Sorry for the bad pics on this one.



 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the reply! Got a few questions :)

Now what it mean to wet sand?
What about plastic parts, would I just paint it, no paint remover or anything? It would seem that paint remover would damage the plastic...
How much does it cost (excluding the paint)?
Did you paint your models in one of those Paint Booths?

Nice job on the models! I really like the Lambo, I'd look good next to the 30th Ann. Diablo!
 

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I know a little bit about painting 1:1 cars but not 1:18, it should be fairly similar. Wet sanding means that you keep the surface and obviously abrasive paper wet with water all the time during sanding. You are right plastic parts might be a bit tricky not only because of the paint remover but also for the fact that plastic parts should be coated with a special primer for the paint to be applied on and last long. If the paint you will use can be used on both surfaces (plastic and metal) then there should be no problem, as I said I have never painted a diecast before. Having used the paint remover make sure that nothing is left from it on the surface, as you might imagine, remainings of the remover will also remove the paint you will apply, if not cleaned completely.
 
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Boedan,

rpm makes some good points in his post.

Once you have applied the paint remover, the model should be down to its bare parts. You will still need to sand the mdoel to remove any residue with fine grit paper. Do this while the model is submersed in water or completely wet. Running water will yield the same results.

Do not spray plastic part with the paint removal, instant damage will occur. I have fond out the enamel paints work best on plastic parts as long as the paint isn't thinned.

Paint remover in a spray can starting prices start at $4-5. You can also buy the paint gel that is recommended for industrial use in a tub for $45 at O'Reilly's. I would recommend the spray can though.

I painted my models outside and allowed them to air dry in the garage. I used a heat gun to speed up the process.

I would recommend painting a donor model first as a good experimenting source.
 
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