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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After a successful motorsports season in 1995 in the GT2 category, Porsche made it their duty to develop an automobile capable of winning the even more powerful GT1 category which, despite all modifications, could be recognized as a 911 at first sight. The result is something to be quite proud of. Despite this, the concept of the GT1 distinctly deviates from the long technical course of the 911. One of these differences is that the Flat-6 engine for the first time ever in a racing version of a production vehicle - moves towards the center. Exactly where its place had always been in the sports prototypes built by Porsche. Another major difference is the engine. The horizontally opposed 6-cylinder engine of the 911 GT1 is fully water cooled. This might have been shocking for 1996, because the 911 [993 generation] was still air cooled, but the world knew the next year of the water cooled 996.

The whole concept of the GT1 class must be first understood before appreciating the true beauty of the 911 GT1. The GT1 class was for race cars which were based on production cars. Thus, Porsche based its GT1 on the 911, using its engine and looks, but moved the engine, and severely increased HP. Because of this, some competitors, like McLaren, argued that the 911 GT1 was not really an evolution of the 911, but just a new car with the looks of the 911.

The premiere of the 911 GT1 was at the 24-hours race of Le Mans in 1996: superior double victory in the GT1 category and positions 2 and 3 in the overall placing behind the Joest TWR Prototype (962 derived) Porsche. After the race, McLaren was in a frenzy about the past 24 Hours. They said Porsche "took the fun out of the race" and went on about how it was unfair that they made the GT1 and entered it. Porsches kicked McLaren all over the race track and McLaren couldn't handle it. Their golden-boy, the F1 car, had been embarrased in front of everyone.

In the end, the 911 GT1 had air restrictors forced upon it, forcing the horsepower down to about 600, far from its potential of 700+ horsepower. Meanwhile, McLaren countered with its F1 GTR, which was even faster than their previous model. Toyota, Nissan, and a host of others were so pissed off about the 911 GT1 and how it dominated in 1996 that they were all destined to 'beat the Porsches' in 1997. They all spent millions of dollars on their own brand new GT racecars to use at LeMans in '97.

Porsche 993 GT1 1996






Porsche 996 GT1 1997






 

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I think the others had a point though!!! Porsche did stretch the limits of the GT1 rulebook out of all proportion!!! However, the real reason the other teams were pissed off is that they didn't think of doing the same first!!! (It's up to the rule makers to write the rules to make the sport "fair", not up to the teams whose only goal is to win at all costs)
 

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DiecastX said:
Thanks for the great history lesson.
:iagree They're always great to read AR_V6! :cheers

This is one GT1 I don't have that I'm really longing for! :crying Either this or the #25 would be a nice addition. One day!
 

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Angelrott_V6,
I think that it is not correct do denote the two 1996 and 1997 911 GT1 vesrions as 993 and 996 versions as they had completely different engines than regular 993s and 996s. They are just 911 GT1 (1996) and 911 GT1 Evo (1997). And of course, there is the 1998 version which is denoted as 911 GT1 1998.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
lazard said:
Angelrott_V6,
I think that it is not correct do denote the two 1996 and 1997 911 GT1 vesrions as 993 and 996 versions as they had completely different engines than regular 993s and 996s. They are just 911 GT1 (1996) and 911 GT1 Evo (1997). And of course, there is the 1998 version which is denoted as 911 GT1 1998.
Lazard

You have your opinion regarding the GT1`s, but I strongly disagree with you on this point .

The Porsche GT1 was the race development of the standard 911 roadcar . As they were based on that particular years road car , it is correct to denote them as 993 GT1 (96 version) and 996 GT1 (97 version) .
The engine in the earlier 993 GT1 differed from that years road car because it was water cooled (as in the 996 series) as opposed to being aircooled as in the 993 .

There was indeed a 1998 version of the GT1 but this was also based on the 996 but differed from the 996 GT1 97 version , in that it had a more aerodynamic body and the engine , although still watercooled , had an increased capacity to 3.6 litres.
 

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Angelrott_V6,
everything you wrote is right, of course. But both 911 GT1 and 911 GT1 Evo had engine volume of some 3160 cc whereas standard 993s had 3600 cc (3800 cc for RS) and standard 996 had 3400 cc (the original versions) and 3600 cc (present versions). Therefore, on the basis of different engines, for me, the 911 GT1 is not 993 and the 911 GT1 Evo is not 996.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks,

I'm trying to organize this forum over the weekend for easier navigation and didn't want to lose this post due to the picture not showing.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I do have a question, I wonder why this car never had the same heightened interest(relative term) as the McF1?

thinks its due to the procalmation of the McF1 being the fastest car in the world?
 

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Darrick, the McLaren F1 was built purely as a road car. It was only enthusiasts that asked the company to develop the car for them for the racetrack.
In the case of the Porsche, only one example of the GT1 was ever built to comply with the rules that there should be a roadgoing version of the car for it to participate in the GT1 category. There is only one GT1 road car and its in Singapore. Sadly the car is not even driveable on the road because Singapore law does not permit LHD cars to be driven on the country's roads. What a terrible waste.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Winston,

I believe there is more than 1 GT1 rolling around. I was aware of the one in Singapore, I was only aware of the one in Puerto Rico which is owned by a political figure there.

Doesn't homologation requires a certain amount of cars to be built to be eligible for competition?
 

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Good lord how I would love to have one of those first two models pictured. A few years ago, they had either the 1996 GT1 #25 or 1997 #38 STP at a local hobby store, can't remember which model exactly. Only saw it a few times before it got purchased, and by that time I was actually saving up for it. :rant

Great writeup. This thing was a serious competitor for the F1 GTR. I'm still very impressed at how it won 1996.
 
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