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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ahead of a move next year (hence my recent decorating spree), I’ve started the long (and completely boring) task of reattaching my diecasts to their bases. It’s a lot fiddler than taking them off, that’s for sure, especially when there are a couple of attaching plates. For instance, my Norev R5 GT Turbo and I had strongly opposing views as to how it was going back on its base. Noting its recalcitrance, I’ve made a mental note to shove it as far back in a storage area as I can once I’ve moved.

These two things amused me. I noticed my white Aa Toyota GT86 had a code label that was peeling. Curious to see what was underneath, I peeled it off to see the original label for an orange GT. Either I’ve got the wrong box, or the wrong diecast.

I was also amused by the ‘best before’ date on the XJS. I’d not noticed that before. I didn’t know diecasts could go off :)

That’s ten diecasts now safely repacked. I’ve only got about another 120 to go…

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If you can't find the correct screws/mounting plates and the wheels are spokes I would get some of those plastic tidy strips with the thin metal inside.
Then tie the wheels down to the base and use strong clear tape on the underside of the base to hold the ties in place.
Another alternative would be actual cable ties, but finding some long enough yet thin enough to go through the spokes may be a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you can't find the correct screws/mounting plates and the wheels are spokes I would get some of those plastic tidy strips with the thin metal inside.
Then tie the wheels down to the base and use strong clear tape on the underside of the base to hold the ties in place.
Another alternative would be actual cable ties, but finding some long enough yet thin enough to go through the spokes may be a problem.
Thanks for the advice, Slartibartfast. I always keep the boxes, screws, attachment plates (if there are any), so I should be ok. Plus, they’re only going to be transported by a van (that I’ll be driving - carefully), so I hope that the original packaging will be sufficient for the trip :)
 

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Thanks for the advice, Slartibartfast. I always keep the boxes, screws, attachment plates (if there are any), so I should be ok. Plus, they’re only going to be transported by a van (that I’ll be driving - carefully), so I hope that the original packaging will be sufficient for the trip :)
Then I hope you keep the relevant bits for each box - in that box.
It doesn't always work for me, in my case screws seem to grow or shrink, and sometimes change mounting thread..... :unsure::rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Then I hope you keep the relevant bits for each box - in that box.
It doesn't always work for me, in my case screws seem to grow or shrink, and sometimes change mounting thread..... :unsure::rolleyes:
Yep, I keep everything together in the relevant box, so no worries there :) I’ve been dreading this moment for ages, so doing a bit at a time should make the task less maddening. Luckily, not all of the diecasts need to be secured with screws - phew :)
 

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Then I hope you keep the relevant bits for each box - in that box.
It doesn't always work for me, in my case screws seem to grow or shrink, and sometimes change mounting thread..... :unsure::rolleyes:
Or they grow legs and disappear.

Sometimes I think I should take pictures of them so that I can post them to a milk carton!

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hehe I love the best before date on the XJS.

I also have similar story putting models back in their original boxes. In the past I used to flatten the boxes and separate all the bits and pieces but I used to chuck them all in a ziplock bag or box without separating them. This makes it tricky when I need to find matching mounting brackets and screws when it comes to re-assemble them back into their original base. I've wised up now and keeping the parts separate in its own ziplock bag with clear label on. In fact I have even stopped trying to flatten those with window boxes in order to save space so I can put the models back quicker without having to trawl through my storage boxes for the box, plinth, frame, cardboard backing, screws and so on.
 

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I've had a few screws gone missing over the years, but so far, never from model car boxes.😁

I also keep one of these magnetic sticks handy, which I use to "scan" the floor whenever I hear the noise of something metalic and pick up whatever fell off.

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I also keep one of these magnetic sticks handy, which I use to "scan" the floor whenever I hear the noise of something metalic and pick up whatever fell off.

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Haha funny you brought this up.. I have the exact same thing LOL although i never thought of using this to track runaway screws before though.. bought it years ago mainly for the purpose of searching for items that roll under the couch LOL

No matter how large a mounting screw is, if it gets away from you, it will always play hide and seek..... :LOL:
Remember an eBay ad i posted under Limp bucket awhile back? One can always fork out 40 bucks for an Autoart screw if it ran away from you LOL
 

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Haha funny you brought this up.. I have the exact same thing LOL although i never thought of using this to track runaway screws before though.. bought it years ago mainly for the purpose of searching for items that roll under the couch LOL



Remember an eBay ad i posted under Limp bucket awhile back? One can always fork out 40 bucks for an Autoart screw if it ran away from you LOL
I don’t know how it has happened, but over the almost 30 years I’ve been collecting and customizing diecast, I have a Ziplock bag that has hundreds of black screws of a broad variety of sizes, up to and including those big black ones from UT.

If you ever need anything, PM me, I’ve probably got it.

By the way, got another bag of chrome screws as well, although not quite as comprehensive of a collection as the black ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Luckily, I never removed any of my 1/43s from their bases, so they should be easy enough to move. I have some 1/24s that need attaching. This is going to be a looooong task :)
 

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Hi Gino,
I read that you are driving your models yourself, I would cling wrap the opening parts on some of the rarer / more expensive ones so they can't open & close en-route. If you have a Kyosho Lancia Delta Integrale, be sure to secure the boot, otherwise it will bend and might even sheer off.

Maybe even cling wrap some models to their bases in case they sheer off (unlikely, but you never know!)

Good luck with it :):)
 

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Ah yes cling wrap is actually a brilliant idea to secure the model to its base. I never thought of using that at all until i noticed a number of china based sellers shipped their models to me with extra efforts being put into securing them by wrapping them around with cling wrap film (with soft tissue paper underneath)
 

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totally agree about the tissue paper.. i tend to use tissue paper to cover the entire model before putting them in the clamshell style Styrofoam box just in case the surface accidentally rubs against the surface during transit. And for that extra piece of mind i too chuck in small bag of silica gel just in case the model has to stay in it for an extended period of time.

the worst experience i had with melting plastic/rubber was a super rare Revell Porsche 914. The previous owner tied rubber band around the bonnet area to secure it without anything underneath it. Needless to say after 10+ or 20 years of storage the rubber band melted and eat into the paint. :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
This is all great advice, and much appreciated! I will take it all on board. Thank you! As it happens, I do have a Kyosho Delta; one reason I was going to secure the boot was to stop the spare wheel coming out and bouncing around the inside of the box and over the car :)

I’ve got some diecasts with bits that keep dropping off (like Norev’s CX) which I’ve yet to reattach; I may cellotape these parts (rear bumper, something from the chassis that’s suspension related) to the plastic base the car is mounted to. I can reattach them after the move :)
 
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