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I'm still a relative newbie in the 1:43 arena. I know that in general, there are diecasts and then there are resin models. The so-called "hand-built" cars seem to be held in highest regard by collectors. So my question is how does a hand-built differ from a regular 1:43? Are the cars not all pieced and assembled by hand? :confused

:feedback
 
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They are, but the "handbuilts" have more parts and details made/built by craftsmans rather than mass production models, but as some of the handbuilt companies started mass producing, their appeal seems to be losing.

The man hour spent on those models are probably much greater than the mass produced cars, and handbuilts definitely have a lot more photoetched parts and metal components. In fact, some of the handbuilts I believe are made in white metal, so they are very heavy.

A good way to compare is to look at a handbuilt model and compare a similar model that is mass produced.

Just my .02

(and I'm sure someone has a better answer than me)
 
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Luciano, this site might be of interest to you:
http://www.toyline.com/bri/Generalinfo.html

Their definition of handbuilt models:

"Handbuilts are usually low production runs of white metal or resin castings. Finished model prices are significantly higher than diecast because of the low volume and considerable hand finishing. Handbuilts are often the best quality and detail and offer interesting models which the larger diecast firms would never consider. Handbuilts are usually more fragile and may offer functioning parts, but they are definitely not toys. "
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for that info Kelvin. Now, what exactly is this "white metal"? Is it different from Zamac (I think I first heard of that material from LUW)?
 

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From what I understand, white metal is almost a synonimous to Zamac (zinc aluminum metal alloy casting). White metal to me is any alloy with high contents of aluminum, zinc or tin. I think it was used to designate alloys with lower quantities of lead, that make the alloy greyish in color. In the early 1900's and late 1800s, before the wide use of tin, lead was used a lot to make toys. It was too soft and heavy, and white metal came as a substitute for it when doing die cast parts.
 
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The 1:43 BBR/Gasoline models would be a good example of a handbuilt model. Very limited editions - 100 or so

You can purchase these assembled or buy in kit form to assemble yourself. Both pricey though.

Provlence Moulagh (or however you spell it... :giggle) is a further example of these special models in Kit form or ready built, again very limited editions..

Good thread this one.....

:cheers

Timbo.
 
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Your right, I have a few Ferrari F1 models in both hand builts and mass produced model and hands down the hand built is far better, in terms of fit and finish and materials used.
When I get the opprotunity I will shoot some comparision shots.
 
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actually
the gasoline builds are bargains

they are going around here for €140 compared to the factory BBR which is around €210-€230
both now have, for instance, the Maserati MC12
and i've held both in my hands, and basically i think i would go for the Gasoline for better price/quality range
 
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It's been said that some of the big names in the industry are doing too many models that their quality went down, on the other hand, independent builders seems to be doing a much better job at building models, even in some case, at a lower price...
 

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<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post][/right]
'White Metal' definitions found on the web

White Metal: Any combination of alloys of nonprecious metals such as lead and tin. Also called "Pot Metal".

White metal.
(a) Any one of several white alloys, as pewter, britannia,
etc.
(b) (Metal.) A fine grade of copper sulphide obtained at a
certain stage in copper smelting.
 

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<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post][/right]
Strangely the tooling costs for whitemetal models are lower than for die-cast. The reason being that the metal used in die-casting is very hard & the models need to be cast using steel dies. However, the metal in whitemetal models has a much lower melting point & can be cast using rubber molds by means of centrifugal casting.

The main reason whitemetal models are so much more expensive, is that they generally have a much lower appeal. Certain UK cars are barely known in Europe or the USA & consequently are only made in runs of typically 500-600. The tooling costs therefore have to be recouped over far fewer models. They are also handbuilt & finished which is very labour intensive & labour costs in the UK are far higher than in China - it all adds up.

Amongst my collection I have about 50 whitemetal models, only a few of which are available as die-casts, all of which post-date their whitemetal equivalants.

Most of the above info was cribbed from Spa Croft Models website - £80 for one of their Standard Vanguard Phase IIIs - I had to have one as no-one else makes it!

:cheers

jinx
 
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