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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After being out of the hobby for some time, I only recently found out about resin models. Having never seen one in person, I'm curious as to what others think of them in relation to diecasts. I know there were some discussions in the past, but I'm curious if opinions have changed. Can we expect all makers to eventually move to resin?

Some look quite nice, based on pics, but some, in particular the bottom of the Autoart Toyota Century Grimm, looks unbecoming of a $200+ model (it looks like a budget model where the engine is molded into the chasis).
 

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Resin and composite(ABS plastic) aren't the same thing. Resin models in general have more accurate shape and far superior paint quality compare to composite models, but 99.9% of resin models are sealed un-openable.

Autoart's composite models are made in ABS plastic which is the exact same material Lego uses for their products.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Interesting. I didnt even realize there was a difference between the 2. I see composites include opening parts and seem more on par with diecasts. How are they weight wise? Do they have the heft of a diecast? My only point of reference are model cars I once built which are quite light/flexible.
 

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I have several of Autoart's composite models and think they are good quality. I'm generally pleased with them and their details. They are lighter weight than the metal die cast pieces, but I believe you will find them heavier than plastic model cars you built in the past.
 

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At first I was quite averse to the idea of models being made in plastic but now I don't mind them at all. They're super light yeah
 

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Since it was mentioned that Autoart models are made from ABS just like Lego. I have noticed s strange phenomena with some of my Lego bricks. Some brown bricks namely seats have turned brittle and cracked on their own even when just being kept in a box. I would have thought it is from a poor batch but then some 3x2 bricks again in brown turned brittle too. Also have a cracked and broken 12 x 12 green plate. All these have broken without any stress on them from repeated playing by the kids.
 

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I love diecast and resin models. But, the ABS plastic, composite models always look cheap to me. More of a toy than a detailed model. Thinking of the newer AA models, I have only bought one of their composite models, the Porsche GT3 RS. I look at buying their new stuff, but it just doesn't seem worth the price. AA models have gone up so much in price and their quality has possibly gone down. Even their high end stuff does not compare to their previous top models.
 
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I have occasionally strayed from my previous ironclad mandate to only buy diecasts with full, opening features over the last year or so simply because so few companies are releasing such diecasts anymore of the classic racing cars I prefer to collect. I am months behind in posting to the "What Did You Buy Today?" thread and will very soon have a shot of a sealed resin model that blew my socks off with its incredible, realistic detail.

But rather than commit 100% to resins or to the smaller scale (despite the size of my 1/43rd collection going from 6 to 36 this year alone as I grabbed cars that I do not expect to ever see in 1/18th in resin or diecast), I am backing away from the hobby since I don't feel properly serviced by the manufacturers anymore. My past suppliers have mostly fallen by the wayside (Exoto, Carousel 1), substantially decreased their output or restricted the range of subject matter (Acme/GMP, CMC) or switched to resin/"composite" or sealed diecast (AUTOart, BBR, Kyosho, Minichamps, TSM).

There still is a small cadre of mid-range producers of racing cars in full-featured diecast (Schuco comes to mind and Norev for more entry-level degrees of detail) but the bulk of my collection is more high-end (and by that, I mean the quality of detail, not necessarily the prices), dominated by Exoto, with releases by AUTOart and Minichamps in their heyday so it becomes almost impossible to settle for less.
 

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Interesting. I didnt even realize there was a difference between the 2. I see composites include opening parts and seem more on par with diecasts. How are they weight wise? Do they have the heft of a diecast? My only point of reference are model cars I once built which are quite light/flexible.
Hi, welcome to the forum!

It might be worth you checking out the thread we have discussing AutoArt's composite models.

New Autoart Composite Models - Thoughts?

I will read through this thread and see if it's worth incorporating into in to the thread I've linked to. For an actual discussion about diecast v's resin, I will find a link to that discussion as it has come up a lot before.

Thanks.
 

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I only have one AA composite model, a Huracan in Rosso Mars, which I bought to see for myself if it was a bad as some say. I was surprised to find it is quite a decent piece!

However it doesn't look to me as if the panels have gone through a painting process, but rather I suspect that red plastic - in an approximate shade to Rosso Mars - has been used to cut costs even further.

I don't know if they put extra weight inside to make it feel heavier, but the Huracan weighs 611 grams, against 689 grams of the pre-LP Gallardo, and 695 grams of the Gallardo Balboni.


I have noticed s strange phenomena with some of my Lego bricks. Some brown bricks namely seats have turned brittle and cracked on their own even when just being kept in a box. I would have thought it is from a poor batch but then some 3x2 bricks again in brown turned brittle too. Also have a cracked and broken 12 x 12 green plate. All these have broken without any stress on them from repeated playing by the kids.
If the AA composite material is really the same as Lego's, then this is very concerning. That would be the equivalent to zinc pest, which is also what AA claimed they were trying to avert by switching to composite, if I'm not mistaken.

I'm about to invest quite a bit of money on a few composites, including EB110 SS and Diablo SE30, maybe I should wait for any stories of AA composites disintegrating.
 

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The lego story is interesting and I'm curious as to the point you want to make.
I have lego sets which are over 30 years old and I can honestly say they're as good as new.
If that is any indication of material durability, I have zero doubt regarding my AA composite models.
 
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I guess Ottos are resin? The few I have are quite heavy or comparable weight wise to a metal diecast. Same with my Laudo models.

While the subject matter means more to me than the material it’s made from, I do baulk at Aa’s prices for a non metal model. I don’t mind what Otto and Laudo charge for sealed, non metal models, but not the extra Aa charges for opening, non metal, models.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It might be worth you checking out the thread we have discussing AutoArt's composite models.
Thanks Craig. I searched to see if there were recent discussions but only used resin as a keyword thereby missing the one thread quoted which I'm going through now.

Being a bit of a traditionalist I'd prefer my car bodies in metal. But seeing the way the market is trending composites are likely inevitable if I want to keep collecting new stock.
 

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Since it was mentioned that Autoart models are made from ABS just like Lego. I have noticed s strange phenomena with some of my Lego bricks. Some brown bricks namely seats have turned brittle and cracked on their own even when just being kept in a box. I would have thought it is from a poor batch but then some 3x2 bricks again in brown turned brittle too. Also have a cracked and broken 12 x 12 green plate. All these have broken without any stress on them from repeated playing by the kids.
If it's particular colours then it may be due to the colorants used - the ABS in Lego is directly coloured by additives in the material. If you cut a Lego brick in half it would be the same colour all the way through. AA are most likely 'natural' ABS that's painted, I'd be surprised if they use colorants. ABS itself is a highly stable material.
 

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Not sure what Spark are (ABS or Resin), but their models always seem incredibly well detailed for the price.

Personally, I still prefer the heft of a diecast (sealed or opening, the latter preferably), but I do think that fine detail should be easler to achieve with Resin or ABS than cast metal.

It's not always true, but certainly is in some examples I have.

I still pine, though, for the days when you could pick up a diecast BBR Ferrari for £150 or less!

M
 

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Spark are resin.

Fine details are much easier to achieve using resin or plastic than they are in diecast, it's a function of both the materials and the manufacturing process. With die cast metal the only way to get sharp edges and parts with thin cross-sections is to do additional processing and that is prohibitively expensive in most cases.
Resins with fine details that aren't up to diecast levels will be solely down to design choices.
 

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Resin and composite(ABS plastic) aren't the same thing. Resin models in general have more accurate shape and far superior paint quality compare to composite models, but 99.9% of resin models are sealed un-openable.

Autoart's composite models are made in ABS plastic which is the exact same material Lego uses for their products.
And, just to add, ABS is also what you'll find on almost every piece of consumer electronics.
 

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If it's particular colours then it may be due to the colorants used - the ABS in Lego is directly coloured by additives in the material. If you cut a Lego brick in half it would be the same colour all the way through. AA are most likely 'natural' ABS that's painted, I'd be surprised if they use colorants. ABS itself is a highly stable material.
"Virgin" ABS is the term, I think. But in the plastics industry, they still call the raw thermoplastics like ABS, polypropylene, etc., as "resin," not to be confused with how the model car industry uses the term "resin." Additives such as colorants and stiffeners can be added to the ABS resin within the injection molding production line, using machinery, before the parts are molded, or the manufacturer can buy grades of ABS resin that are already blended with the additives.
 

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"Virgin" ABS is the term, I think. But in the plastics industry, they still call the raw thermoplastics like ABS, polypropylene, etc., as "resin," not to be confused with how the model car industry uses the term "resin." Additives such as colorants and stiffeners can be added to the ABS resin within the injection molding production line, using machinery, before the parts are molded, or the manufacturer can buy grades of ABS resin that are already blended with the additives.
Virgin material and natural coloured (uncoloured) material are different things. Virgin is material that has no recycled or 'regrind' plastic in it, it can however be coloured or reinforced (e.g. glass-filled) - either of those would still be called virgin.
Colourants are typically contained within the raw material pellets rather than being added as part of the injection moulding process, but plastics can also be supplied without colourants.

What I was saying in my reply to Winston, above, is that if there are differences in the ageing behaviour of different colours of Lego, it's likely that the colourant used is to blame, since they're likely to use the same grade of ABS across colours (any glass fill etc).
On the other hand I can't see why AA would use anything other than non-coloured ABS (naturally an off-white colour) since they'll paint it anyway, so if it's a colourant related effect on the Lego there's no reason for it to affect AA's models.
 
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