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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Saying Hello, just to say Goodbye...

The one thing I have learned about the die cast collecting hobby is that there are many facets to it - all of which do not entail collecting models.

For me one of the best parts is seeing a new collector come through the door and announce their presence as it represents the hobby has took one step further in its growth. Unfortunately, there is a flip side to that - and perhaps the next saddest thing in the hobby - saying Farewell... to a collector as they drop out of the hobby all together or move on to other interests, family issues or the many other reasons that can and have pulled them from our beloved hobby.

The one thing that is a fact about collectors of the hobby is they all have various reasons for getting involved in the hobby - some more personal than others - while some are more trivial than others. Nonetheless, it makes for some good times as the enthusiasm, passion and friendships generated by these gems are often too much to describe with words.

Expectations on ones estimated tenure in the hobby is not something that is always at the forefront of discussions, but in theory it is, as the face of the hobby is consistently changing - ever ask yourself: "I wonder what happened to so and so" - they haven't been around for some while now ?

So what happened to them?

Hard to say definitively - but its safe to say, we see the emergence and then disappearance from those who have not been collecting for very long more than any other.

Anyone who has been in the hobby for any amount of time, 1 week, 1 month, 1 year or even 10 years - we have all been new at one point - couldn't have known when they started the hobby how long they would around in the hobby - or even what they were getting themselves into. But everyone soon finds out.

A few categories can be identified by newer collectors in the hobby - none of which can be labeled as a negatives: young collector, casual buyer, trader, part timers, accumulators, interest collectors and collecting enthusiast. Long time collectors can emerge from any of these groups and I am sure have too.

Upon entering the hobby, budget models often provide a easy, accessible and satisfying approach to the hobby - no matter which category you fit in. Purchasing that first model introduces a new collector to the hobby. As a collection grows (sometimes instantly or over night), a reintroduction into the world of collecting begins - brand knowledge, details, accuracy, pricing, themes, required commitment, "must haves" and constant new releases can all be a huge hurdle to overcome.

Going from collecting budget models(providing thats what you cut your teeth upon entering into the hobby) to premium models can be something that doesn't come with an initial shock - that usually comes after a few models costing $100 or more.

This is where the crossroads often start - for those who are able to moderate their purchases, they are able to curb their buying habits which results in them sustaining themselves in the hobby. As this can easily become an expensive hobby - it often does. An old saying about "collectors" of anything is that it is often reserved for the rich and wealthy. Not so - but at times a few grand of disposable income wouldn't hurt the cause.

The difference between buying a $20 model and a $100 model is huge when you think about it - often not at first. The feeling of getting "that model" is often numb, regardless of the cost - particularly if its your first premium model. Some do this very early in their collecting days and its magical as they truly find a passion and commitment that these models can bring from ones heart. And they go on with out ever looking back and often amass a brilliant collection of models.

Unfortunately, this isn't the norm for every new collector into the hobby.

For some who travel down the aforementioned path - the expensive part of the hobby reveals its face. For the casual collector or part timer this can represent a problem as spending this type of money for a model car that is still considered a toy by most if not all, is not their priority.

Young collectors, meaning kids in college and/or still live at home with their parents can also discover the problems which can arise from devoting X amount of dollars into a collection every month. Especially when they start going out with friends and/or get their first taste of puppy love - they are hit with a lifestyle change.

From what I have seen, these are the types that have come in and made the most impact with some of the hobby's latest and greatest model purchases in such a short time only to say farewell or disappear without a hint of their whereabouts. New interests with even greater satisfaction can easily replace a collection of model cars - so their departure can easily be understood.

Another common and abrupt exit comes from bad online shopping experiences. With the absence of hobby and model shops on every corner, alternatives come in the form of Ebay, online retailers, message forum classifieds and other online activities. Being that some models are fragile as eggs, shipping from point A to point B can be an act that results in a damaged model. Imagine paying $100+ for a model car and it arrives in the mail, met with great anticipation - only to be discovered that its damaged in some way or another. Even if this person owns stock in super glue, having that first experience go worng is enough to deter a 2nd time - if ever at all.

But if not so much for the expensive side the hobby can show, there is a level of commitment that is required to maintain a collection. This can be more expensive than any dollar amount ever spent - even if its not monetary. Some discover this side and find it to be a bit much - but the most ironic thing - some never reach the point of discovering the commitment it takes - EVER!

Those are only some of the obstacles a new collector will face - there are still many unknowns as to why some leave the hobby after a brief extent.

However, farewells are not just reserved for newer collectors, unfortunately the hobby have lost some of its long time community members and leaders to unforeseen and personal reasons. Often these reasons require a collector to put off some purchases momentarily or indefinitely - and/or come to the realization that their participation in the hobby has come to an end. Regardless of the reason - selling off a collection can remedy or subdue any financial burdens and allows for a clean break. Selling a collection that has grown over the years, with thousands of dollars spent, numerous hours of searching for and caring for models has got to be painful, no matter how you look at it.

The hobby of die cast collecting has been around since the turn of the century and there still seems to be a new feel about it. Not because I have been in it for a short period of time - but more so due to the fact that we consistently see collectors come and go. What ever happened to those collectors who bought their very first models 25 years ago, 20 years ago, 15 years ago, 10 years ago? Certainly they all have not packed up for greener pastures - I certainly hope history doesn't repeat itself in that regards - thats a lot of new and old faces coming and going in between.

As we make our next purchase, tenure in the hobby is not something that is on our mind while opening the wallet. The collector that introduced himself isn't on our minds either as we open the wallet and neither is that farewell we just read and responded to by saying "best of luck".

So for those who have been at this for a while or even a short time - are we immune to this "come and go" syndrome - or is it just as much a part of the hobby as those who have been around for a long time?

Authored by Darrick(DiecastX)
 

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Nice post, Darrick. :cheers

I've been giving this subject some thought of late, as my interest in the hobby most definitely waxes and wanes over time... Lately I've noticed that my acquisition volume has dropped and when I do buy a model, now it's usually a high-end one. Of course, it doesn't help that I have other interests that are vying for my cash dollars... like having a 1:1 WRX STI that 'needs' a new turboback exhaust system, or the fact that I will be moving into a new house this Fall and will need to buy new appliances and furniture. Or that Suzuki Boulevard M109 I've been eyeing...

These interests and activities affect the amount of time I have to participate on DX as well, which in turn has a moderating influence on my interest level.

Then there's the commitment angle that you mention. It takes a lot of room to store and display our cars. They have to be dusted and fussed over. Photographed. If you have a large collection like I do, you have to think about possibly insuring them. Then there's all that time spent on eBay looking for deals, and of course, there's all the time spent on forums (DX especially) to keep up with the latest and greatest. It can get to be a bit much after a while, even for a seasoned collector.

I don't look at it as a 'come and go' syndrome... but I do think that the variation in interest level is natural. Actually, I think it's healthy... I would worry about addiction if I was constantly obsessing about and focussing on one very narrow segment of my life to the exclusion of all other activities.

At the end of the day, it is still about having fun with this... as long as I'm having fun, I'll continue collecting these little lumps of metal and plastic. I've learned so much (about so many things) as a result of participating in this hobby that I can't see completely leaving it. I've also learned that, as in life, moderation and balance over the long haul yields the most satisfaction. Burnout is no fun, and one of the dangers of high passion levels over time is burnout. So... maybe the key to longevity in this hobby (or in any endeavor) is to moderate your emotional investment and add variety to your interests.

That's my story, and I'm sticking with it. :giggle Of course, your mileage may vary! :cheers
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Jeff,

Congrats on the new home :cheers

I would reccommend forgoing the furniture and parking the M109R in the living room - if my wife would allow for it, I would :lol

I think its a natural prcession of interests to move around from one segment to the next in life. Mine does for sure.

But I often wonder what happens to those whose interests wain and are never heard from again.
 

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Great read Darrick. Finally found time today to read it, and I'm glad I did.

I hope I will not be one of the new/young collectors who is yet to discover how many more things make take priority over hobbies and end up losing interest/ability to maintain my collection. Though I am of course yet to experience it, I hope I am mature enough to realise how many things I will have to consider ahead of the hobby in future years, and there will undoubtedly be times when I cannot dedicate as much time and/or money to it. That said, I hope I will be able to successfully balance all my interests, and don't find myself forced out of the hobby.

As for whether I will at some point lose interest, all I can say is not in the foreseeable future. After that, who can say?

One thing I can say is that because I am limited (very limited compared to some here) in how many models I can buy per month/year, new models still keep me excited, though certainly DX is a big part of keeping me interested in between. So long as I can continue to sensibly limit my budget without losing interest in the times when I cannot afford many new models, I see no reason to completely leave the hobby.
 

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I also find some people just leave "online", though still collecting diecast, so they are still collectors just have no time to share ther passion online, so they are seen as out of the hobby.

As long as I have a diecast I will feel I still have the hobby close to me, even though my time is directed towards other things in my life.

A very good read Darrick & its a greater understanding I have never really thought about.

:cheers
 

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I may be wrong, but I think a very important factor to this is how thirsty the collector arrives at the fountain. Usually, as with almost all things in life, if you go slow you get farther.
 

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Great read Darrick! :cheers I will echo the sentiment that if you take it slow and not buy everything the second it comes out, you will enjoy the hobby more.

If I had to do it all over again, I would even do it slower and be more selective with my purchases. I do understand how some can get burned out so quick and move on.

I have a 19-YO nephew that I have been giving budget models for Chistmas and birthday for all of his life. He has bought several premium models on his own from the time he was 14 till he got out of HS. He discovered girls and 1:1 and now his 100+ car collection is in their garage and in boxes in storage. For a while he was buying any new AUTOart that came out and he just burned out.

I personally don't think that I would enjoy my collection as much as I do, if I had gotten all in a short period of time or if I just wrote a big check and acquired them all at once.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When I first started, I didn't immediately have the resources that DX now offers. It wasn't until later that I learned a good model from a bad model and then I even found my niche.

If armed with that knowledge before hand, my collection would not only be smaller, but more carefully picked out.

Time and experience are a collectors best friend if your expecting to be around for a while.
 

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:iagree I have a handful of budget models I picked up when I wasn't even really a collector as such, and I am going to have to sell them to make space for models that I actually know about and want - that's if they have any value whatsoever. The longer I collect for (all relative I know) the more I discover what I do and don't want to collect. As a result, there are always going to be a few models that I probably wouldn't miss if I was to sell them.
 

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<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post][/right]
The same goes for me. I think that diecast collecting is more then anything a learning experience, so you have to go slow and go through the ropes. Something like motorsports; you just can't throw even a talented driver directly into F1 without going through some basic categories beforehand.
 

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DiecastX said:
Another common and abrupt exit comes from bad online shopping experiences. With the absence of hobby and model shops on every corner, alternatives come in the form of Ebay, online retailers, message forum classifieds and other online activities. Being that some models are fragile as eggs, shipping from point A to point B can be an act that results in a damaged model. Imagine paying $100+ for a model car and it arrives in the mail, met with great anticipation - only to be discovered that its damaged in some way or another. Even if this person owns stock in super glue, having that first experience go worng is enough to deter a 2nd time - if ever at all.
So true! I'm just getting into the hobby, and my first 2 purchase experiences were not too pleasant. The very first car that I got through eBay still has not arrived after more than a month (was returned to sender at some point apparently) and the second model came from a large online store in a wrong color with few parts that I had to re-glue. At that point I had to ask myself if its really worth it to get into this mess...
But then arrived the Gullwing bringing tears of joy to my eye, and there was no more doubt :wink
 

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It's a part of any hobby I suppose. I havent been on here as much as I used to, don't post much anymore. I suppose it's a combination of things, lull in new product, personal issues, new interests. I have just bought my 9th 1/16th scale tamiya tank.

I think it comes with any hobby, It's especially hard when you have so many models but not enough display room. makes you think why you have em all...

People mature like every other hobby, I no longer follow the scattergun approach of buying things just because I like them.

This place is a great encouragement, and I don't think people should be worried about people coming and going.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Nice post, Darrick. :cheers

I've been giving this subject some thought of late, as my interest in the hobby most definitely waxes and wanes over time... Lately I've noticed that my acquisition volume has dropped and when I do buy a model, now it's usually a high-end one. Of course, it doesn't help that I have other interests that are vying for my cash dollars... like having a 1:1 WRX STI that 'needs' a new turboback exhaust system, or the fact that I will be moving into a new house this Fall and will need to buy new appliances and furniture. Or that Suzuki Boulevard M109 I've been eyeing...

These interests and activities affect the amount of time I have to participate on DX as well, which in turn has a moderating influence on my interest level.

Then there's the commitment angle that you mention. It takes a lot of room to store and display our cars. They have to be dusted and fussed over. Photographed. If you have a large collection like I do, you have to think about possibly insuring them. Then there's all that time spent on eBay looking for deals, and of course, there's all the time spent on forums (DX especially) to keep up with the latest and greatest. It can get to be a bit much after a while, even for a seasoned collector.

I don't look at it as a 'come and go' syndrome... but I do think that the variation in interest level is natural. Actually, I think it's healthy... I would worry about addiction if I was constantly obsessing about and focussing on one very narrow segment of my life to the exclusion of all other activities.

At the end of the day, it is still about having fun with this... as long as I'm having fun, I'll continue collecting these little lumps of metal and plastic. I've learned so much (about so many things) as a result of participating in this hobby that I can't see completely leaving it. I've also learned that, as in life, moderation and balance over the long haul yields the most satisfaction. Burnout is no fun, and one of the dangers of high passion levels over time is burnout. So... maybe the key to longevity in this hobby (or in any endeavor) is to moderate your emotional investment and add variety to your interests.

That's my story, and I'm sticking with it. :giggle Of course, your mileage may vary! :cheers
Vegasracer, you describe me to a T. I'm 17 years old going on 18, and I'm going to graduate high school soon, so there will be far bigger things to worry about than collecting models. I have other concerns such as schoolwork, a job, and my social life so my interest goes up and down with how much free time and money I have. I just recently got back into diecasts after a more than 5-year absence from the hobby, because of other things competing for my money. Even now I'm not going to be buying a lot of diecasts, just a few to work on in my spare time.

However, I think it also connects to why we collect. For me it's something to do with my spare time. But more importantly it's why I fill my spare time with this instead of other things: To create something to take pride in and belong to a devoted community with a common interest.

I got into this hobby when I was maybe 5 years old. The reason was simple: I loved cars (and still do) and I wanted to have replicas of the 1:1 cars I wished I could own. Up until I was 12 years old, I was OBSESSED with diecasts to an almost unhealthy extent. I mean, they were all I would think about every day. I would spend all my allowance on models and always asked for them for my birthday and christmas.

Since then I've grown up and matured. I have other things to spend my money on like clothes, electronics, etc. When I saw a nice car, I would get a momentary interest in diecasts. I would want to buy a diecast but they always got put on the back burner and eventually forgotten. Also, I saw the interest as a "childish" thing and I wanted to be into something more mature and adult-like. I want to customize my models because I see so many nice 1:1 cars, but I don't have the time or money to own any of them. So I will build my 1:18 cars as I would build a real project car, with performance upgrades, new wheels, etc. No matter what other interests I have, I never forgot my first love - cars.

But with the fun comes the work. I have to spend money on other models to get parts from, tools, paint, and glue. However, when I am not doing any of those things, I don't want to just sit around playing Halo all day. I don't want to sit in my pajamas and rot in bed thinking about where my life is going to go next. I want to build and create something. I want to get off my ass, go out and DO something. And for me, nothing beats building up a diecast project car, adding parts and putting my own sweat and muscle into it, modifying it like a 1:1. I can show off my work for people like you guys on DX to admire. At the end of the day, I can take pride in something I created with my own two hands and share in a close-knit community of people who love their hobby. That alone is worth every bit of the money and time I spend.

That's why I'm here.
 

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But with the fun comes the work. I have to spend money on other models to get parts from, tools, paint, and glue. However, when I am not doing any of those things, I don't want to just sit around playing Halo all day. I don't want to sit in my pajamas and rot in bed thinking about where my life is going to go next. I want to build and create something. I want to get off my ass, go out and DO something. And for me, nothing beats building up a diecast project car, adding parts and putting my own sweat and muscle into it, modifying it like a 1:1. At the end of the day, I can take pride in something I created with my own two hands. That alone is worth every bit of the money and time I spent.

That's why I'm here.
beater1/18 i am sure that i am not the only reader to recognise that you are a very insightful young man!!

I am nearly 3x your age and if only i had had your head on my shoulders when i was your age.

I also wish you success in all you undertake and i imagine you will take on great things - but i hope you remember to heed your own words and find time to keep DX somewhere in your life... :cheers
 

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But with the fun comes the work. I have to spend money on other models to get parts from, tools, paint, and glue. However, when I am not doing any of those things, I don't want to just sit around playing Halo all day. I don't want to sit in my pajamas and rot in bed thinking about where my life is going to go next. I want to build and create something. I want to get off my ass, go out and DO something. And for me, nothing beats building up a diecast project car, adding parts and putting my own sweat and muscle into it, modifying it like a 1:1. At the end of the day, I can take pride in something I created with my own two hands. That alone is worth every bit of the money and time I spent.

That's why I'm here.
beater1/18 i am sure that i am not the only reader to recognise that you are a very insightful young man!!

I am nearly 3x your age and if only i had had your head on my shoulders when i was your age.

I also wish you success in all you undertake and i imagine you will take on great things - but i hope you remember to heed your own words and find time to keep DX somewhere in your life... :cheers
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Agreed! :happy

:goodpost It seems that more often these days DX is attracting doers and not just talkers! And isn't it interesting how that seems to be happening as the diecast industry as a whole is going through a real "correction" and we're all forced to re-evaluate why we're a part of this hobby in the first place and what our plans for the future are?

Is it possible that this hobby attracted huge numbers of the mildly-interested during the time when every maker pumped out tons of popular models in every shade for $25 each? And now that those days are gone for good it's survival of the fittest?
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
But with the fun comes the work. I have to spend money on other models to get parts from, tools, paint, and glue. However, when I am not doing any of those things, I don't want to just sit around playing Halo all day. I don't want to sit in my pajamas and rot in bed thinking about where my life is going to go next. I want to build and create something. I want to get off my ass, go out and DO something. And for me, nothing beats building up a diecast project car, adding parts and putting my own sweat and muscle into it, modifying it like a 1:1. At the end of the day, I can take pride in something I created with my own two hands. That alone is worth every bit of the money and time I spent.

That's why I'm here.
beater1/18 i am sure that i am not the only reader to recognise that you are a very insightful young man!!

I am nearly 3x your age and if only i had had your head on my shoulders when i was your age.

I also wish you success in all you undertake and i imagine you will take on great things - but i hope you remember to heed your own words and find time to keep DX somewhere in your life... :cheers
[/quote]

Thank you. I do hope that I can continue to be with DX throughout the years and learn a lot as I go along. I'm learning a lot about life right now.
 

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Good post Darrick. As a child, I built plastic 1:25 scale model cars and had a rather large collection at one point. After college, I sold them off and about 10 years ago discovered diecast models. I started with the same scale (1:25) but not long after, I discovered some 'budget' 1:18 like Maisto, etc. A year or two later, I came across some upscale
models like GMP, Lane, Kyosho, etc and I was hooked. The difference in quality and detail were amazing. Then came Exoto, CMC and others and there was no turning back. I go through periods where I don't purchase any new cars for months and then go through a hot streak where I'll add a half dozen or so to my collection which now numbers about 110. Now, there are quite a few new releases on my Want List and it continues to grow weekly. But, as a small businessman, I have to make purchases based on the economy and how my business is doing as well as what kind of bargains I can find out there.
Looking at collections of some of the members of this group keeps me fired up to add certain new releases to my collection so thanks to all of you who post the photos of your incredible collections. And, for you newbies out there just getting into the hobby, more than anything else, enjoy it....have fun.....collect what you like and what lights your fire when you see it.
 
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