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John
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586 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know the best coat for a finishing touch. I used testors, but it doesn't really make the car shiny enough. Does anyone here use anything special. And if so, what brand is it that your using? I really want to know. :?:
 
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I have tried Testors air spray and spray paint, yielding the best results from the spray paint as the shine seems to be more natural. Hope that helps.

You can also try Tamiya paints,but they are so hard to find.
 

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John
Joined
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586 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks X. I think I'm going to hunt down the tamiya paints this weekend. The F355 project cannot rest untill finished. :roll: If you know what I mean. I guess I'm really impatient when it comes to diecast. :knutkck:
 
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I use Tamiya paints, then cut it back with a nice polishing compound. Most of my models have come out very good. Primer, paint, polish.
 
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Tiff,

When you use the polish, does it come out shiny at the end? How many times do you polish it? Does they shinyness come out any close to the burago Ferraris? :?
Actually, the polish is what gives it the glassy finish. Usually, no matter what you do, you'll have a bit of orange peel. You've got to give the paint a good amount of time to cure as well (a few days), otherwise it'll end up a mess. Then, just use an auto polishing compound and go lightly, eventually it'll buff out to a great gloss. How many times you need to do it depends on how rough the final coat of paint was.

It's nearly impossible, whether using an airbrush, spray can, etc, to have a "mirror" finish when you're done. (Even on 1:1 cars) That's what polishing compound is actually made for. Works great, just be patient. And I know that being patient sucks!
 
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Some 1/24 scale modelers I know use (of all things) Future Floor Polish, sprayed on with an airbrush. They get an extremely glossy finish.

:sm:
You can use clear coat spray as well with good results. Some folks do it over their decals on racing cars for protection, although I usually don't. But you still need to polish/smooth out the colored coats beneath the clear coat.
 
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Will it be ok for me to use an automotive polish after applying a coat of clear or will the clear haze up :? This is an old project, it shines well, but doesn't have the bold glare associated with glassy finishes. :?:
 
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Will it be ok for me to use an automotive polish after applying a coat of clear or will the clear haze up :? This is an old project, it shines well, but doesn't have the bold glare associated with glassy finishes. :?:
It "should" be OK, since I've never had a problem with hazing when applying any polish, regardless of the finish.
 
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You may want to pick up a model polishing kit from your local hobby shop. They come with varying grades of fine grit sandpiper that you use in progression from coarsest to finest. By the time you get to the final sanding it will have removed the orange peel. Then applying a good coat of wax will bring out the gloss you are looking for. Many plastic modellers use these to achieve contest winning shines. Several companies make them and your local hobby shop should be able to help you out.

RonR
 

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5,265 Posts
In all seriousness, what I do when I re-paint my 1/18 scale diecast is bake them in the oven (in my kitchen, and yes, I do have a very understanding wife, thank you). I pre-heat it to about 200 degrees, and then put the car in for about 10-12 minutes, turn off the heat, let it sit for another 10-12 minutes, and then let it cool naturally in ambient room temperature. I do this between coats of primer, as well as coats of finish coat.

One thing to remember, however, you need to have the body off the chassis, and no plastic parts attached. I dissassemble all my re-paints, and paint the plastic parts separate (usually I do not have a finish mis-match between the plastic air-dried parts and the die cast oven-baked ones).

A little experimentation might help, and I have had to restrip and repaint some that I used inferior masking tape on, and tried to bake with it in place. If you are doing two tone paint jobs, I recommend letting the paint air dry first, and then removing all masking tape before baking. I have seen little difference between the two baking methods.
 
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I keep hearing of folks placing models in the oven to cure the paint. I use a Wagner heat gun, does the oven work better than a gun. :?:
 
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