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Geez, so many types of paints but NO tutorial to be found about what-when-where-how when it comes to diecast :ranting !

Well, this kit form Testors
, that I thought was enamel in reality is acrylic paint. Does anyone use these paints for diecast? I'm thinking of buying a junk car to test this paint, just using a primer and one color as an experiment. This kit has a very nice price for the six colors plus primer and propellent (but still way more expensive the one or two cans), so I was thinking of first trying it out with spray cans.

Does Testors have these acrylic paints in aerossol? And what is better, enamels or these acrylic? :feedback
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the link X, but I already read it (more then once). The problem with those tutorials is that they're about plastic and not diecast, so somethings I can't apply.
 

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What kind of info you need actually :confused

If you can use Tamiya paint for your mod than it'll make your life easier :happy

Trust me...if not than send your model to me... :cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The problem is that Tamyia TS paints are outrageously expensive here, and very hard to find (I found one or two colors on each corner of the country). Testors enamels in spray cans on the other hand are easier to find and cheaper, so that's why I'm going with it. I found a nice kit by Testors, that comes with a kind of airbrush, propelent, primer and six colors for a nice price, but it's acrylic paint.

If I'm going with Testors, what is better, enamels or acrylics? Someday I'll buy a proper airbrush, but for now I'll settle for spray cans. What do you think?
 
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LUW,

From your other post, you requested help from experienced customizers. Well I'm far from experienced, but heres my take.

I have the propellent set that your talking about, and I have used it only once due to its inconsistency. I will stress the fact that this propellent kits are difficult to use as it is extremly hard to laydown a smooth job.

The Testors paint that is supposed to be used in conjunction with the propellent kits is too thick, which may explains why the instructions tell you to use the enclosed needle to constantly clean the nozzle.

I used the propellent kit to paint a UT Corvette and when I finished, it looked like I had painted the car with a freaking snow blower.

One of the reasons I figured for the poor results is, there isn't a constant pressure. thge pressure in the can constantly changes with every motion and as the contents get lower, the pressure reduces as well.

Testors also make a spray gun that is similar in price, I don't have one as I figured it would yield similar results as the propellelnt.

If your going to go with Testors, I would suggest using the aerosol as it is a little more predictable and easier to work with.

Don't know if that helps, but thats my experiences with the propellents.
 
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I have painted a fair number of models over the years using enamels, acrylics, spray cans, and airbrushes. With regards to the difference between acrylics and enamels, both will work equally well on diecast. Once the acrylics dry well, several days, they're just as hard as enamels. The biggest difference is in the cleanup and thinning as the acrylics can be thinned with water or regular rubbing alcohol.

As for painting, an airbrush is the best way to go but not using proprellants. You can control the air pressure much better with a compressor and a small one can be purchased for about 100.00. The paint needs to be thinned about 60/40 paint to thinner but again this depends on the paint. A good primer coat should definitely be applied first.

With spray cans, just about any brand will work and should be used with a compatible primer. Even automotive lacquers can be used as well as any discount paints such as Krylon or Rustoleum. The key with spray cans is to warm the paint first by placing the can in a pan of very warm water for a few minutes. This allows the paint to flow much better when sprayed and more even coats.

The key is practice, practice, practice and experimenting with different kinds of paint on something you don't mind ruining. The propellants are good for small pieces and parts and will work, just not as well.

Hope this helps and good luck. :cheers

RonR
 
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