DiecastXchange Forum banner
1201 - 1220 of 1259 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,091 Posts
OK, thanks for that.

Was the damage at the back of that wheel was caused by your efforts to prize it off?
I have cut the remaining pieces from a similar mess and used a circular sanding piece to get it flat.
Then I can glue a replacement part to suit whichever mounting system is in use.
Well, that's the theory - some just don't work, some end up slightly wobbly. :giggle:
Yes it was. Some hubs are less accessible and easier to damage, ding up. I sell all these OEM wheels on ebay which pays for the new set of wheels!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,359 Posts
That's interesting, I did not know that.
Did Nascar give a reason?
Don't tell me it was because it wasn't 'stock'! :ROFLMAO:
There were a number of theories.

One was that they weren't "stock", as you point out.

Matadors came with five lugs from the factory, and to make a wheel four lug required non-standard parts, and special machine work.

Another was that not all teams had the resources to duplicate what Penske had done, and it was, therefore, an "unfair advantage".

I just pulled my copy of Donohue's book off the shelf, and looked at the chapter on the Nascar Matador, and no mention there though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,314 Posts
There were a number of theories.

One was that they weren't "stock", as you point out.

Matadors came with five lugs from the factory, and to make a wheel four lug required non-standard parts, and special machine work.

Another was that not all teams had the resources to duplicate what Penske had done, and it was, therefore, an "unfair advantage".

I just pulled my copy of Donohue's book off the shelf, and looked at the chapter on the Nascar Matador, and no mention there though.
TransAm was essentially based on FIA group 2, with a few changes (no multi valve engines if memory serves).
And the rules there would have been even more strict than Nascar at that time.
Perhaps Nascar didn't really like the idea of a Yankee 'furriner' invading their territory at that time. :LOL:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,359 Posts
TransAm was essentially based on FIA group 2, with a few changes (no multi valve engines if memory serves).
And the rules there would have been even more strict than Nascar at that time.
Perhaps Nascar didn't really like the idea of a Yankee 'furriner' invading their territory at that time. :LOL:
The Sports Car Club of America was pretty parochial regarding sedans racing alongside their beloved sports cars. My first race car was a 1969 Z28 Camaro prepared to A-Sedan rules.

I bought the car in 1975, and only at that time were we allowed such “modifications” as removing the cardboard-based interior trim panels on the doors and rear passenger compartment.

We had to keep them in a pretty much stock appearance until they created the GT classes that combined the sports cars and sedan into performance-based classes in the early 80’s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,314 Posts
The Sports Car Club of America was pretty parochial regarding sedans racing alongside their beloved sports cars. My first race car was a 1969 Z28 Camaro prepared to A-Sedan rules.

I bought the car in 1975, and only at that time were we allowed such “modifications” as removing the cardboard-based interior trim panels on the doors and rear passenger compartment.

We had to keep them in a pretty much stock appearance until they created the GT classes that combined the sports cars and sedan into performance-based classes in the early 80’s.
Were you allowed a roll cage?
When the first Holman and Moody Ford Galaxie arrived in Britain for the 1963 saloon car championship, the officials complained about it having the full Nascar type cage fitted.
It may even have had the interior fittings removed, which because it was a 'production' series were supposed to be included in the car.
The seats etc. had to be fitted, but it's possible the cage was allowed to stay.
So a cage for safety reasons permitted, but fire hazard materials were not!
I can't find a definitive answer to when the FIA allowed the stripping out of such things in group 2 (which seems to have persisted even into the lower spec 1976 regulations).
The introduction of group A for touring car racing finally saw the sense of being allowed to strip the interior completely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,359 Posts
Were you allowed a roll cage?
Yes, we had a full cage that extended from the front shock towers to the rear attaching points of the rear leaf springs.

GM produced a chassis preparation manual with diagrams on where the cage tubes should be located for maximum chassis rigidity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,314 Posts
Yes, we had a full cage that extended from the front shock towers to the rear attaching points of the rear leaf springs.

GM produced a chassis preparation manual with diagrams on where the cage tubes should be located for maximum chassis rigidity.
Have you ever seen the roll hoop and single support brace that is inside the race versions of the AUTOart Nissan KPGC10 Skyline.
It is quite correct according to the books I have, terrifying to think that these cars ran around the banking at Fuji back in the day.
And in competitions such as the first generation touring cars of the 60's usually didn't have any kind of roll over protection.
We were discussing the Paragon Jaguar MKII models recently, my race version has the full interior and no safety protection of any kind. o_O
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,359 Posts
Have you ever seen the roll hoop and single support brace that is inside the race versions of the AUTOart Nissan KPGC10 Skyline.
It is quite correct according to the books I have, terrifying to think that these cars ran around the banking at Fuji back in the day.
And in competitions such as the first generation touring cars of the 60's usually didn't have any kind of roll over protection.
We were discussing the Paragon Jaguar MKII models recently, my race version has the full interior and no safety protection of any kind. o_O
As a racer, it has never failed to amaze me how reckless prior generations were.

To think about how long open wheel racers went without seatbelts, and then how long tin tops went without roll bars and then window nets.

Even though all my racing was in full bodywork cars, the first piece of safety equipment I ever bought was a Bell Star closed face helmet, and I never wore anything other than that style in my entire career.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,314 Posts
Since I already customized this truck (blended a Welly Club Cab dually with an ACME Ramp body), thought I'd take it a little further and add a storage rack above the bed.

Nice work!
What are those intriguing things on the shelves in the background?
They look like the motoring equivalent of a big game hunters trophy wall.
Not that I approve of hunting dumb animals or unfortunate cars...... :LOL:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,359 Posts
Since I already customized this truck (blended a Welly Club Cab dually with an ACME Ramp body), thought I'd take it a little further and add a storage rack above the bed.

Nice work!
What are those intriguing things on the shelves in the background?
They look like the motoring equivalent of a big game hunters trophy wall.
Not that I approve of hunting dumb animals or unfortunate cars...... :LOL:
That's part of my collection.

A corner unit with most of my remaining 1/18 scale Nascar models, along with some road racers (GMP, Greenlight and Welly racing Mustangs) as well as my Customer White collection, and some of my customs.

IMG_6479 by Jim Forte, on Flickr

IMG_6480 by Jim Forte, on Flickr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,359 Posts
OK, at these new angles I can see that the whole model is present!
Of course, when your collection spills out on to the floor, you have a bad case of 'collectoritis'. :D
And this is after giving away over 250 Nascar models and donating approximately 80 winged sprinters and Indy cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,314 Posts
And this is after giving away over 250 Nascar models and donating approximately 80 winged sprinters and Indy cars.
OK, so it's the downsized collection.
Were the Nascar models in 1/18th scale, most I've seen are 1/24th.
Which is ironic since American subject plastic kits tend to be 1/25th scale.
And when you put them side by side, that difference is pretty obvious.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
So I have been on a quest to get an AUTOart Bugeye WRX as seen here. The most recent one I received was a wagon that showed up with a missing effing headlight! So I went to AA Spares and picked up a pair of headlights. Unfortunately, the only one that they had available was the all chrome version. Apparently all the wagons had black head lamps but the sedans were split. The black sedans came with black head lamps but the blue, white and silver cars came with chrome lamps. AA Spares only had the chrome lamp. This is what I received. The plastic lense was already removed.
Body jewelry Silver Gesture Natural material Pre-engagement ring


I originally decided that painting the lamp would be way too challenging to do properly so I was going to just slam in the pair of chrome head lamps and be done with it, but getting the left side lamp out was absolutely impossible, so I grabbed some flat black paint and a toothpick and the results are below:

Grille Car Automotive lighting Hood Vehicle


The repaired side

Tire Wheel Automotive lighting Vehicle Hood


The original side
Tire Car Vehicle Wheel Hood


Is it 100% original, no, but it was nearly impossible to paint inside that lamp to get it 100%. I didn't have a strong enough magnifying glass or a steady enough hand to get the rings 100% Sitting inside my case you'll never see the difference unless you were looking for it. I was able to set the lamp in and get the fit flush.

I still have a silver sedan en route, but this came out WAY better than I had thought it would.
 
1201 - 1220 of 1259 Posts
Top