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I prefer diecast as that is what the Australian industry has been giving us for over 25 years, but resin has allowed for many more niche models to be made that would not be economical in diecast. If something is only available in resin but I want a model of that car, I'll have a look and assess it on merit. Something like the Ruf Yellowbird has never been done in diecast, so I had no choice but to go resin if I wanted one for the collection.
 

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If I like the subject, I’ll buy it whether it’s diecast or resin. But, that’s partly because the models in resin that I like are at what’s an acceptable price point to me. Maybe I’d feel different spending £300 on one. I think sealed resins are about 15% of my collection (rough guess); I think I have enough opening models to enjoy to counter the sealed ones :)

Initially, there is more surprise and delight with an opening model for sure. But, over time, I can’t say I necessarily enjoy an opening diecast more than a sealed one.

I’ll tell you this, though. When looking at my existing collection, I’m happier to pick up and look at a sealed resin than I am to pick up an opening diecast and spot more paint rash. :-(
I can echo this. I don’t believe I even opened the doors of my red Solido Supra before it went into my case. I didn’t see a way to open the door without risking damage (yes I could use a plastic pick or toothpick) but I didn’t want to mess with it.

My blue AA Bugeye has fitment issues with the rear door and trunk, the paint chipped on the door when I tried to close it, etc.

I’m perfectly okay with moving the car from the box to the case and then enjoying it as it is. I’d rather spend $200 on a pair of Ottos that interest me compared to a full open $200 model of the same type (unless it was “the” model for me then that’s another story.

Resin seems to be a common choice for less exotic cars and if that’s what it takes to get models of what interests me, I’m all for it.
 

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I collect a very limited subject matter, so I don't usually have a choice of diecast or resin. I have to be flexible and just buy what's available.

I really enjoy exploring a fully opening model when I first get it, but once it's just sitting on the shelf looking pretty, it no longer really matters.

Paint rash makes me sad. Most of my older diecasts have rash to varying degrees, and even new old stock has been coming with some rash. It bothers me enough that I struggle with the decision of fully opening diecast or sealed resin, even when the price is close. I usually end up going fully opening since the model just feels a bit more realistic to me that way.

Now we have sealed diecasts and fully opening plastic. Sealed diecast to me is the worst of both worlds. Future paint rash and nothing opens. They are my least favorite (but I would still buy it if I like the subject). Fully opening plastic like AUTOarts, I admit I really like. Super crisp details, tight shut lines, extremely smooth finish, all the benefits of sealed resin but most of the benefits of diecast. Granted, they don't have the weight and feel of metal.

Unpopular opinion: I don't really care about weight and feel of diecast that much. I'd happily give that up for the crisp details, tight shutlines, and super smooth finish. If I can get full opening plastic for the price of diecast or close, I would opt for that.

The things I like least about sealed models:
  • The thin "glass". On some models, it looks wavy. I've seen some BoS modes where it's completely warped and popping out. Granted, it does seem to be more scratch resistant than the standard polycarbonate. Not sure what the stuff is.
  • Crap chrome paint. BoS, MCG, maybe Triple9 often have this. The window trim is just dull silver paint on the inside of the super thin "glass". Very unrealistic. The better resins use photoetched trim glued to the outside which I prefer.
 

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I purchased my very first resin model, a 2023 Corvette C8 Z06, as it's not being made in diecast yet. It has a heft to it, which surprised me, but has no moving parts.
My preference is always for the diecast model, but it may be that I'm just too old school.
 

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Now we are becoming more accepting of sealed models its not just resin models that are sealed any more, there seems to be more sealed diecast's appearing.
My 1/18 Range Rover sport by Kyosho and MCG Ford Granada are both diecast and sealed. I believe most sealed Norev's and Minichamp's are diecast and not resin.
I remember the outcry on this forum when Autoart started releasing sealed models.
 

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I don't care what details are sacrificed, but I HATE sealed models and I want opening parts. Granted I can handle Indycar and F1 models being sealed, but I HATE HATE HATE non-rolling wheels even more compared to anything else regarding resin BS. I don't give a hoot for any of the reasons. When someone perfects mixing resin with die cast together so we can go back to the way every future model should be made at all times, with ROLLING WHEELS AND OPENING PARTS without too much compromise, that will be a day to celebrate in this hobby.
 

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I am a very open minded model car hoarder. I am definitely not a radical oppositionist on a crusade against resin (or composite) model cars, though I have always had resons of my own not to be very fond of resins.

And that isn't only because they have no opening parts, and are quite unremarkable in the "features" department. I also don't like them because they are extremely fragile, which makes them a risky choice for buying in the second-hand market. And I am mostly a second-hand market buyer, so I would not try my luck buying used resins unless I knew the seller and could go collect it in person, but not before thoroughly inspecting it myself with a magnifier.

Other than that, I like to feel like I'm getting my money's worth out of everything I buy, and resin model cars... well, most won't fit that bill, apart from maybe a few Ottos, which I have to admit are quite tempting and priced alright - provided I either pre-order them or get them on release.

However... as I discovered by myself, there is always a reason to give in and go resin once in a while. I've always wanted a Ford F-150 SVT in my collection, but the fully opening Bburago/Maisto option is just too crude and underscaled.

So, I went with the sealed resin DNA option. I have no regrets, because 1) I only paid €66 for the model itself, €89 in total with postage and 2) even looking closely, I can't even tell that the model isn't diecast and has no opening parts, it looks just awesome sitting beside my other trucks.

I find it hard to understand why do people scoff at resin or sealed models, but then praise models which only have driver and passenger doors as their "opening features" but sealed hood/trunk. Not to mention that these types of models are also terrible in every other aspect.

When a model is bad, it IS bad no matter what material it's made of, or how many opening parts it does or doesn't have.

(y)
 

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I find it hard to understand why do people scoff at resin or sealed models, but then praise models which only have driver and passenger doors as their "opening features" but sealed hood/trunk. Not to mention that these types of models are also terrible in every other aspect.
I agree. If they have to make a partially opening model, I would prefer hood (or trunk if rear engine) open over the doors. I can already fully see the interior of a model through the windows, but I can't see the engine if the hood doesn't open. Sometimes, the engine or the way the hood opens is what makes a car unique or special.
 

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I always maintain that the sealed models are necessary evil in this scale model car world. Without them we likely won;t see half of the rare obscure subjects being made at all.

However this gradual acceptance from us collectors somehow encourages model makers to take shortcut and slowly replacing their full opening production with sealed stuff, while still charging more or less the same price as their previously fully open models.
 

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However this gradual acceptance from us collectors somehow encourages model makers to take shortcut and slowly replacing their full opening production with sealed stuff, while still charging more or less the same price as their previously fully open models.
I know what you mean, but the sad reality is, the model car industry makes these expensive half-ar$ed toys because they know they will get away with it. They know they will sell them, if not to you or to me, then to the next person.

We are only a few individuals discussing model cars on a model car forum, of which only a handful exchange ideas and opinions about what's on the market.

There are tens of thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands, or perhaps even millions of people out there who just walk into a toy shop and buy a 1:18 model car without even knowing what it is. Not to mention smalles scales, of which most don't have opening parts anyway...

I can only speculate how can someone is able to afford $500 on a moulded piece of resin on wheels, but the fact of the matter is: somehow, somewhere, there are people with such an immense purchasing power and so little care or understanding of the concept of value for money, that they just spend that money just like they spend on watches they never wear, or bottles of expensive booze to give away to friends, or shoes they never use.

On top of that, there is a whole new generation of "collectors" who don't even know they are "collecting" yet. They walk into a shop and buy a MCG, next time they go for a Triple 9 and next for a KK, or a Kyosho Ousia/Samurai or whatever other sealed option is out there, and for them it's great, they don't know any better, they have no idea there's a little place on the Internet called "DiecastXchange" where a bunch of people are stressing about manufacturers making products we don't agree with because of a multitude of personal likes/dislikes. :LOL:

Anyway, I guess what I'm trying to say is, I wish we could make a difference, but sadly, we don't... :confused:
 
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