DiecastXchange Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,516 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know if anybody else collects white-metal models - they are a great deal more expensive than their 1:43 diecast equivalants. However, equivalant may be the wrong word, as white-metal models tend to be of more obscure 1:1s, which rarely appear as diecast, due to their lesser appeal and hence sales potential.

Here are a few examples, firstly the Austin A40 Farina :



The A40 was introduced in 1958, with the aid of styling by Pininfarina, hence the name. The model is by Pathfinder (now defunct) of a Mk II of 1967 vintage - one of the last to be made as production ended that year. The model itself is 1 of 600, split over two colours, 300 each in red &, from memory, green - no way could I afford both.

Next up is something from Rootes, a Sunbeam Rapier H120 :



The Rapier is again by Pathfinder, and is one of their last models - only 500 were built, again split 50:50 between two colour choices. The real car was introduced in 1968 on the Hillman Hunter "Arrow" platform, with lines stolen from the contemporary Plymouth Barracuda - Chrysler had taken over the Rootes combine in 1967.

Pathfinder only made 36 models under their own name, although, they built about 10 other models as commissions from other parties, I have 14 altogether - I am still looking for a Ford Zephyr Mk IV which they produced for a Norwegian company.

Finally, two for the price of one - the Vauxhall HC Magnum & Firenza :



The green one is the Firenza - both were based on the HC Viva introduced in 1970. The Firenza appeared in 1971 & the Magnum in 1973, and were just the coupe & larger engined versions of the Viva. The Firenza only lasted until 1975, but, 204 of them were the infamouns "Droopsnoot", which was used in UK Touring Car Racing. Both of these models are by Thoroughbred Models and are each 1 of 350. There was an alternative colour choice, yellow for the Magnum & orange for the Firenza, again 350 of each of these. I have heared somewhere that Thoroughbred are to make the Droopsnoot - makes sence as it should not be to difficult to alter the tooling.

:feedback

jinx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,516 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post][/right]
This is something I posted last year (taken from a site specialising in white-metal models):

Strangely the tooling costs for whitemetal models are lower than for die-cast. The reason being that the metal used in die-casting is very hard & the models need to be cast using steel dies. However, the metal in whitemetal models has a much lower melting point & can be cast using rubber moulds by means of centrifugal casting.

The main reason whitemetal models are so much more expensive, is that they generally have a much lower appeal. Certain UK cars are barely known in Europe or the USA & consequently are only made in runs of typically 500-600. The tooling costs therefore have to be recouped over far fewer models. They are also handbuilt & finished which is very labour intensive & labour costs in the UK are far higher than in China - it all adds up.

jinx
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top