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X-Garage 18 - Chevrolet Corvette XP-87 Stingray Racer

24443 Views 178 Replies 32 Participants Last post by  X-Filer
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I'll be posting here the photos of my 1:18 models. As you will probably figure out, there are some shots that I took quite some years ago and others much more recently so I appologize right away for the poor quality of some. I've been reshooting some models and, If there's interest from you guys I might replace some of the poorer images with better ones.
Also, you'll understand that I like to capture the miniatures in full detail so don't find it odd if some models have 100+ photos...


Let's start with a model I detailed a few years ago:

Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa - 1958 (MB Sales)











































Later on I swapped the steering wheel for a photoetched one by Tremonia:



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Fantastic start,loving the close ups of this Great looking model.
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Wow the 250 TR looks pretty good i presume that is a Hotwheels? I presume you blackwashed the wire wheels and added mesh grill? The wheels look a lot more realistic than its stock form.
Looks like you detailed this one a lot, nice job!
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Great job on adding details and the wheels look much better in this tone!!
Good job João!
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Wow the 250 TR looks pretty good i presume that is a Hotwheels? I presume you blackwashed the wire wheels and added mesh grill?
No, I've compared it with the Hot Wheels and although the general moulding is similar, it's not the exactly the same. This model dates from the early 2000s when here in Portugal (and I assume on other coutries too) Shell was offering the Ferrari Colezzione which included the 1:18 Ferrari F50 (Maisto), 1:18 Ferrari F512M (Hot Wheels) and two other 1:18 which only have the mention on their boxes "Produced by MB Sales". There were also some other 1:35 Maisto models and various others equally unmarked regarding who built it (specially F1, 750 Monza and other classic models in 1:35 scale).

As to what I've done, indeed I added the metalic mesh grille (and deleted headlights) and washed the wire wheels in aluminium paint for more realism but that's just the tip of the iceberg. All the inner pannels were painted matte black, the engine was aluminium-painted and detailed regarding wiring and plumbing, I added a 250 LM gearshift gate and a head pin for the gearshift lever, the hood and spare wheel straps are made from leather and the buckles were handmade from needles. Also the fuel tank was aliminuim-painted, the exhausts were bored out and the original steering wheel was replaced by a Tremonia photoetched piece.
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AC Cobra 427 Super Snake - 1966 (Shelby Collectibles)

















































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Another Great looking model with Excellent close ups,i am a big fan of close up detail and it's a joy to see all these great shots,love the colour too.Always got time for a cobra.
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The background adds a nice bit to the realism--is this a place nearby?
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The background is on a railway bridge next to my grandparents' house. I make quite a lot of my photo sets there.

Some more photos:





































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Next up, arguably one of the most beautiful cars ever made... and one of my absolute favourites in my collection!

Auburn 851 SC Boattail Speedster - 1935 (Ertl)

Without a shadow of a doubt, the 1930s marked the history of the automotive industry as one of the most (if not the most) striking eras since Man put an engine in a vehicle. Not only because it preceded World War II (which would change the world panorama completely at all levels) but by the exuberance many productions presented. Bugatti, Delahaye, Delage, Voisin, Bentley or Hispano-Suiza are just examples of builders who dominated the automobile panorama of the time and who still today are characteristic of that period. In addition to presenting refined and sumptuous models, a fair share counted on the work of exclusive coachbuilders that, under request, performed beautiful bodies to be laid on chassis supplied by the manufacturers: Figoni & Falaschi, VanVooren, Letourneur & Marchand, Mulliner, Gangloff, Erdmann & Rossi, Saoutchik or Chapron are just a few examples. However, if the vast majority of these extraordinary vehicles are originated from the Old Continent, it was possible to find other excellent examples on the other side of the Atlantic: Cadillac, Duesenberg, Cord and Auburn.



This latter manufacturer, the Auburn Automobile Company was a Auburn, Indiana-based company derived from the Eckhart Carriage Company, founded by Charles Eckhart. Their children, Frank and Morris began production (more or less experimental) of automobiles in 1900 and the company grew until being forced to close by the outbreak of World War I. In 1919 the brothers sold the company to a group of Chicago investors who, realizing that they could not make a profit from the business, re-sold the company to the Cord-Duesenberg group that took advantage of the small brand to run cars at lower prices than theirs.



With the technical ability of the acquiring group, the subsequent models came mechanically and stylistically refined, using 8-cylinder engines and even Lycoming V12's at affordable prices. It turns out that the market did not respond and in 1933, just a year after the presentation, the 12-160 was set aside and Cord was forced to develop a new model for 1935 which took the old 6 cylinder engine and reworked it with help from Duesenberg in order to add two extra cylinders. Meanwhile, Auburn's new president Harold Ames hired famed former Duesenberg designer Gordon Buehring to tweak the new Speedster, which reduced the ornamentation on the bodywork, redesigned the radiator grille (now attractively pulled back), and gave a touch of fluidity to the lines, with the rear ending in a beautiful "boattail" (hence the name).



Therefore, on January 1st, 1935 the Auburn 8-851 was premiered, designation that would soon fall in favor of "851 Speedster." The reception could not be better and it was almost unanimous the love for the sweeping lines of the model. Under the bonnet was the new Lycoming inline-8 unit with cast iron block and aluminum head, 16 side valves and 4589cc, which in the supercharged version "SC" received a Schweitzer-Cummins centrifugal compressor fueled by a single downdraught Stromberg carburetor, delivering 150hp, 34hp more than the naturally-aspirated version. The power wasn't utterly impressive so, in order to get both great acceleration and reach high speeds, the 3-speed manual gearbox received a selectable dual-ratio rear end, switchable from the cabin. Quickly the Auburn 851 SC Boattail Speedster (easily recognizable by the outside-mounted chrome exhaust pipes and the "SUPER-CHARGED" letterings placed on the sides of the bonnet) would become the reference for sports cars at the time. Shortly after its premiere, Ab Jenkins would take a completelly stock 851 SC Boattail Speedster on the Bonneville salt flats, and break 70 speed records, including 12 hours at an average speed over 160km/h. Thereafter, all 851 SC Speedsters would bring a dashboard plate to attest to the performances of what was then the fastest production car on the market.



With the enthusiasm created, the 851 Speedster were sold as hot breads and 5000 units would leave the assembly line only in the first year. The model gained notoriety when it was seen in theaters starring in films such as 1936 "Swing Time", 1938 "Blockade" or 1942 "WildCat" and, as a direct result, great Hollywood stars like Marlene Dietrich, Mary Astor or George Murphy bought their owns. However, incomprehensibly, for the following year Auburn would rename the model as "852" and add slight touches to the bodywork and sales would fall dramatically to only 1850 units, dictating the end of the model's life and the company's closure by Cord in 1937 .



The miniature I present you is as far as I know the only 1:18 scale representation (Franklin Mint did it at 1:24 and Matchbox at 1:43), manufactured by the American company Ertl. It is a miniature, as far as I know, discontinued and with overwhelming visual impact. It is extraordinarily well proportioned and the mold is very correct, more so that in certain pictures you need to take a closer look to realize it's not the real deal! The engine is also very well detailed including ignition wiring, chassis number plate and bonnet support. The element that seems less carefully made is the windshield frame, which looks too thick and has the wipers included in the same moulding. The "suicide door" opening is correct although with unaesthetic "dog's legs", although when closed such is completely imperceptible. The paintwork is bright and solid and the chrome plating is quite realistically done (just look at that hood ornament!), for example the radiator grille is one solid piece (not slotted) but it has depth is such a way that it could fool you into thinking it's an actual ventilated grille (don't forget it's a 20+ year old miniature).



The detail of the red-coloured drum brakes showing under those chrome wire wheels (which aren't too shabby) complemented with the white wall tires make a beautiful contrast with the black paint. One detail I find most beautiful is the lettering "Auburn" written over the taillights. The interior doesn't have a lot to offer since the original is quite "clean" to begin with. It's a fact that a bit of carpetting would be welcome and the clocks are a bit off-centre in the dials but they sure have depth and aren't just a sticker splat on a chrome piece of plastic. The "speed certificate" plate can also be found on the passenger's side of the dashboard. Open the dual-sided and double hinged bonnet and you find another pleasant surprise: the engine shows quite some effort in adding detail into the unit, with ignition cables, good-looking carburettors and chrome-plated supercharger, even the chassis number plate is there (although it's just a tampo, don't forget it's an early 90s miniature). If the fluid lines of the car weren't so beautiful, I'd have the bonnet open all the time, showing that beautiful piece of jewelry only classic cars have. Kudos also for the detailed chassis showing the struts and crossmembers of the frame, engine sump, transmission, the whole-9-yards. All it needed was a bit more cabling and piping (brakes and fuel lines) and it would appear to be a superior class model.



All and all, it's a magnificent and increasingly complicated miniature to find, absolutely mandatory for anyone who appreciates the glamor of the thirties!





















































































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Fantastic model and great photos, congrats!


Makes me want to add one, but mine's got to be in red! Ertl put a lot of detail into that Auburn, and also there is the Duesenberg which is another superb piece they made.
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Just dropped in on this thread....
Excellent detailing work X-Filer, and love the subject matter!!
I particularly like what you've done with the straps on the Testa Rossa....
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A perfect combination ... classic american beauty and some impressive pics
.
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Stunning close ups,it's a real Beauty,very nice to see.
I always drool when I look at it. Unlike other models from Ertl, this has a spot-on moulding, which is half-way into having a stunning-looking model. Which it undoubtedly is!
Wow what an amazing set of beautiful photos of the Auburn. No doubt she is a beauty. Amazing model!
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